WELCOME TO INVALUABLE
Be the first to know about
the latest online auctions.
Please enter a valid email address (name@host.com)
Sign Up »
PS: We value your privacy
Thank you!
 
 
Want to learn more
about online auctions?
Take a Quick Tour »
 
Invaluable cannot guarantee the accuracy of translations through Google Translate and disclaims any responsibility for inaccurate translations.
Show translation options

Lot 113: Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902 New York, NY)

California & American Fine Art Auction

by John Moran Auctioneers

25 October 2016

Monrovia, CA, USA

Live Auction

Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902) Please Register/Login to access your Invaluable Alerts

Sold
  • Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902 New York, NY)
  • Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902 New York, NY)
  • Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902 New York, NY)
  • Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902 New York, NY)
  • Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902 New York, NY)
  • Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902 New York, NY)
   
Looking for the realised and estimated price?

Description: ''El Capitan, Yosemite'', wildlife in a Merced River landscape, 1866, signed with conjoined initials and dated lower right: ABierstadt '66, numbered verso: no. 9, inscribed on a gum label affixed verso: Rocky Mountain Scenery, oil on Winsop & Newton millboard, 14'' H x 20'' W, est: $40,000/60,000. Note: The present work is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Melissa Webster Speidel dated 12 August, 2016, and will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonne. Albert Bierstadt, the titan of 19th Century American Western landscape painting, visited the Yosemite Valley, on his second trip west in 1863. Other artists and explorers pre-dated Bierstadt's visit to the Valley, and the artist would have been familiar with the engravings and photographs of the area published in Eastern newspapers and magazines. Seeing these early black and white images of Yosemite certainly fueled Bierstadt's boundless and lifelong desire to paint new subjects and likely influenced his decision to include Yosemite on his second western journey's itinerary. Bierstadt was joined on the 1863 Yosemite trip by author Fitz Hugh Ludlow (whose wife, Rosalie Osborne, the artist would subsequently marry), and artists Virgil Williams and Enoch Wood Perry. According to Ludlow's written accounts, the first glimpse of Yosemite was awe-inspiring for Bierstadt and himself. The group camped initially near the Merced River and then moved to a second camp closer to the base of Yosemite Falls. The trip lasted approximately six weeks ' from early August through mid-September ' and Ludlow reported that the artists worked each day producing paintings and sketches of the scenery before them (G. Hendricks, ''Albert Bierstadt: Painter of the American West'', New York, NY, 1975, pp. 130-132 and N.K. Anderson et al, ''Albert Bierstadt: Art & Enterprise'', New York, NY, 1990, p. 81). According to Melissa Webster Speidel's letter of authentication for the painting: ''The artist was overwhelmed by the magnificent beauty of the valley and employed 'every moment painting from nature'. He would use these oil sketches and studies he painted on the trip to refer to when back in his New York studio painting finished oils'' (M.S. Speidel, Authentication Letter to Morgana Blackwelder, 12 August 2016, p. 1). ''Because the paintings that resulted from the 1863 trip invariably offer an idyllic view of a new golden land, it is easy to forget that Bierstadt'journeyed west during the darkest days of the Civil War'' (N.K. Anderson, p. 80). Started in April of 1861, nearly all of the Civil War's bloodiest battles had been fought by the time of Bierstadt's trip, including the critical July battle of Gettysburg where about 50,000 soldiers lost their lives. Nancy Anderson articulates in ''Albert Bierstadt: Art & Enterprise'', ''for in the western landscape, and particularly in the mountains and valleys of California, Bierstadt found the perfect visual antidote to war'' (N.K. Anderson, p. 80). While other landscape artists engaged in escapism and allegory in their romanticized works, Bierstadt's imagery has a peaceful nature ' but one grounded in real life. ''In his western paintings, Bierstadt offered something more. Distant plains, rugged mountains, and the valleys of California stood apart, untouched by war. Bierstadt's images of such undefiled wilderness offered hope and held on promise of a second chance at Eden'' (N.K. Anderson, pp. 80-81). Bierstadt ''painted approximately 108 finished oils of Yosemite [during the 1863 trip and again on a second visit in the mid-1870s], including several of El Capitan'' (M. Webster Speidel, p. 2). The present finished oil study is a particularly strong example from Bierstadt's first expedition to the Yosemite Valley. The immediacy and intimacy of the composition's location under a forest canopy near the shore of a peaceful Merced River guides the viewer toward the monolithic rock face of El Capitan. ''Bierstadt convincingly creates the impression of depth in his paintings through his use of aerial perspective: rendering objects meant to be seen further away in lighter tones and with less detail. He does this simply and effectively in 'El Capitan, Yosemite' by painting the distant rock formations in golden hues and with little definition. The foreground is cast in shadow and a deer rests under the tree in the lower right, lending a sense of proportion to the painting'' (M. Webster Speidel, p. 2). In ''El Capitan, Yosemite'', Bierstadt presents an untouched California ''Eden'' with no threat from animal or weather, and no sense of the devastating war raging on the other side of the country. While appealing to an East Coast demand for paintings that offered detailed full-color imagery of the still unsullied American Western landscape, the paintings Bierstadt produced from his first Yosemite trip also served as reminders of peace and the possibility of new beginnings. *Conservation report available upon request.

Please note that Moran's requires a letter of introduction from either the registrant’s bank or an established auction house in order to bid on this lot.

Condition Report: Visual: Generally good condition. Blacklight: A small spot of touch-up in the trunk of the tree lower left.

Notes: The present work is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Melissa Webster Speidel dated 12 August, 2016, and will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonne. Albert Bierstadt, the titan of 19th Century American Western landscape painting, visited the Yosemite Valley, on his second trip west in 1863. Other artists and explorers pre-dated Bierstadt's visit to the Valley, and the artist would have been familiar with the engravings and photographs of the area published in Eastern newspapers and magazines. Seeing these early black and white images of Yosemite certainly fueled Bierstadt's boundless and lifelong desire to paint new subjects and likely influenced his decision to include Yosemite on his second western journey's itinerary. Bierstadt was joined on the 1863 Yosemite trip by author Fitz Hugh Ludlow (whose wife, Rosalie Osborne, the artist would subsequently marry), and artists Virgil Williams and Enoch Wood Perry. According to Ludlow's written accounts, the first glimpse of Yosemite was awe-inspiring for Bierstadt and himself. The group camped initially near the Merced River and then moved to a second camp closer to the base of Yosemite Falls. The trip lasted approximately six weeks ' from early August through mid-September ' and Ludlow reported that the artists worked each day producing paintings and sketches of the scenery before them (G. Hendricks, ''Albert Bierstadt: Painter of the American West'', New York, NY, 1975, pp. 130-132 and N.K. Anderson et al, ''Albert Bierstadt: Art & Enterprise'', New York, NY, 1990, p. 81). According to Melissa Webster Speidel's letter of authentication for the painting: ''The artist was overwhelmed by the magnificent beauty of the valley and employed 'every moment painting from nature'. He would use these oil sketches and studies he painted on the trip to refer to when back in his New York studio painting finished oils'' (M.S. Speidel, Authentication Letter to Morgana Blackwelder, 12 August 2016, p. 1). ''Because the paintings that resulted from the 1863 trip invariably offer an idyllic view of a new golden land, it is easy to forget that Bierstadt'journeyed west during the darkest days of the Civil War'' (N.K. Anderson, p. 80). Started in April of 1861, nearly all of the Civil War's bloodiest battles had been fought by the time of Bierstadt's trip, including the critical July battle of Gettysburg where about 50,000 soldiers lost their lives. Nancy Anderson articulates in ''Albert Bierstadt: Art & Enterprise'', ''for in the western landscape, and particularly in the mountains and valleys of California, Bierstadt found the perfect visual antidote to war'' (N.K. Anderson, p. 80). While other landscape artists engaged in escapism and allegory in their romanticized works, Bierstadt's imagery has a peaceful nature ' but one grounded in real life. ''In his western paintings, Bierstadt offered something more. Distant plains, rugged mountains, and the valleys of California stood apart, untouched by war. Bierstadt's images of such undefiled wilderness offered hope and held on promise of a second chance at Eden'' (N.K. Anderson, pp. 80-81). Bierstadt ''painted approximately 108 finished oils of Yosemite [during the 1863 trip and again on a second visit in the mid-1870s], including several of El Capitan'' (M. Webster Speidel, p. 2). The present finished oil study is a particularly strong example from Bierstadt's first expedition to the Yosemite Valley. The immediacy and intimacy of the composition's location under a forest canopy near the shore of a peaceful Merced River guides the viewer toward the monolithic rock face of El Capitan. ''Bierstadt convincingly creates the impression of depth in his paintings through his use of aerial perspective: rendering objects meant to be seen further away in lighter tones and with less detail. He does this simply and effectively in 'El Capitan, Yosemite' by painting the distant rock formations in golden hues and with little definition. The foreground is cast in shadow and a deer rests under the tree in the lower right, lending a sense of proportion to the painting'' (M. Webster Speidel, p. 2). In ''El Capitan, Yosemite'', Bierstadt presents an untouched California ''Eden'' with no threat from animal or weather, and no sense of the devastating war raging on the other side of the country. While appealing to an East Coast demand for paintings that offered detailed full-color imagery of the still unsullied American Western landscape, the paintings Bierstadt produced from his first Yosemite trip also served as reminders of peace and the possibility of new beginnings. *Conservation report available upon request

Provenance: Robert Van Dyke, Honolulu, HI, 1962; Private Collection, Santa Barbara, CA

Dimensions: 14'' H x 20'' W

Artist or Maker: Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902 New York, NY)

Medium: oil on Winsop & Newton millboard

Date: 1866

Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
 
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
 
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)