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Auction Description for Forum Auctions: Important Books, Western Manuscripts and Works on Paper: Day One

Important Books, Western Manuscripts and Works on Paper: Day One (134 Lots)

by Forum Auctions


134 lots with images

15 November 2016

Live Auction

London, United Kingdom

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Ferrers (William de, fourth Earl of Derby, c. 1168 - c. 1247).- Charter, Nicholas son of William of Ambriton [Amerton near Stowe-by-Chartley] acknowledges that he is bound to William de Ferrers Earl of Derby for a virgate of land in the village of Gayton, manuscript in Latin, on vellum, 65 x 160mm., [c. 1217].

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Description: Ferrers (William de, fourth Earl of Derby, favourite of King John and Henry III, c. 1168- c. 1247) .- Charter, Nicholas son of William of Ambriton [Amerton near Stowe-by-Chartley, Staffordshire] acknowledges that he is bound to William de Ferrers Earl of Derby in 2 shillings annually for the ward which his forefathers were due to make at Chester, for a virgate of land in the village of Gayton (12d at Michaelmas & 12d at the Feast of St Mary in March), witnesses: Sir Richard de Vernon, steward of Sir Hugh de Ferrers, Sir Henry Mawesin, Sir Robert de Leg [Leigh], Master Roger de Derby, Sir William de la Ferle and Roger de Vernon, manuscript in Latin, on vellum, 7 lines, in brown ink, in a good charter hand, seal tags, very small hole slightly affecting one letter on sixth line, folds, creased, lacks seal, pencil inscriptions at tail "17 July 1911" etc., 65 x 160mm., [c. 1217].

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Staffordshire.- Ferrers (William de) Charter, 1240 (2).

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Description: Ferrers (William de, fourth Earl of Derby, favourite of King John and Henry III, c. 1168 - c. 1247) Charter, grant by William de Ferrers to Oliver le Form, of all his land in Wobuniesauve in the manor of Chartley, apart from 100 acres which I have previously given to Hamo de Mascy, apart from 80 acres which I had previously given to John de Kent, and apart from 40 acres which I had previously given to Maslen Stephen, to live and to clear (burn) by the overseer of my foresters, abutments beginning "beyond my park at Wythenesiche...", witnesses: Lady Agnes de Ferrers Countess of Derby, Robert de Legh, Ivo Pauntolf, William de Oylly, Henry de Torbok, William de la Ferle, Robert de Watersal, Hugh de Ambrichton, William Peverel and Roger Jambe, manuscript in Latin, on vellum, 15 lines, in a fine charter hand, seal tags, 1 very small hole, folds, a little creased, slightly browned, 100 x 180mm., [c. 1240]; and another charter, conjoined, issued in the name of Robert de Ferrers, sixth Earl of Derby (1239-1279) and Agnes de Ferrers Countess of Derby (1190-1247), coheirs, son and widow respectively of William de Ferrers, fourth Earl of Derby reiterating the above grant, imperfect with loss of text, 140 x c. 170mm., n.d. [c. 1250], both with 20th century pencil inscriptions "17 July 1911" etc., v.s., v.d. (2). ⁂ Agnes De Kevelioch, sister of Ranulph de Blondeville, fourth Earl of Chester.

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Staffordshire.- Quitclaim by Robert, son of Robert Colefax of Ambrichton [Amerton], manuscript in Latin, on vellum, a few small holes not affecting legibility, 110 x 220mm., 1306.

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Description: Staffordshire- Quitclaim by Robert, son of Robert Colefax of Ambricton [Amerton] to Thomas son of Roger de la Pirye of Ambricton, all right in a tenement with houses and croft [in Amerton/Chartley] which Stephen de bello campo [Beauchamp] gave to William Parvus [Little], by this charter Thomas has given 20 shillings of silver for this quitclaim, witnesses: Sir Robert de Bures knight, Robert de Bromley, John de Bronsulf, Roger de Aston, etc., manuscript in Latin, on vellum, 11 lines, in brown ink, in an attractive charter hand, seal tags, a few small holes not affecting legibility, folds, slightly creased, browned, lacks seal, modern pencil inscriptions at tail: "17 July 1911" etc., 110 x 220mm., Certeley [Chartley], Tuesday next after the Epiphany [after 6 January] 1306.

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Medieval Abbott.- Nicholas of Wallingford (Abbott of Burton Abbey 1216-22 or 1218-23) Charter, dispute between Nicholas of Wallingford, the convent of Burton and all the parishioners, manuscript in Latin, on vellum, 165 x 230mm., 1219.

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Description: Medieval Abbott.- Nicholas of Wallingford (Abbott of Burton Abbey 1216-22 or 1218-23) Charter, in 1219 there was a dispute between Nicholas of Wallingford, the convent of Burton and all the parishioners of the said church, free and villein, the cause of this was a custom that the parish send for its lesser tithes in quadragesima [Lent] boys and girls from each house to work in a quarry, or 3d in lieu. Now, in view of the poverty of the parishioners the abbot abandons his claim, and certain lesser sums of money to be rendered by tenants of different amounts of land, witnesses: William de Cresel [Cresley], William de Warda, Gilbert the chaplain of Burton, Herbert the Steward, and Elyas the door keeper, manuscript in Latin, 15 lines, in a very fine charter hand, ragged tear along central fold affecting a few letters but completely legible, with medieval stitching and repairs at head and tail suggesting that this document was repaired in the medieval period, folds, browned, lacks seal, 165 x 230mm., Sunday in the Vigil of St John the Baptist [23 June], a knife being given in seisin [held] in the abbot's hand, in the time of the coming of Pandulf the papal legate, H[enry] son of John, [1219]. ⁂ Written in the aftermath of Magna Carta and during the regency of Pandulf, Hubert de Burgh and Peter des Roches, in the minority of Henry III. This document would have had the knife above mentioned attached to the document in token of seisin, and it is almost certainly the cause of the large central tear with its medieval repairs at head and tail. Pandulf [Pandulph, Pandulph Verraccio] (d. 1226), bishop of Norwich and papal legate.

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Norfolk.- Suffield (Walter of) Episcopal instrument relating to the resignation of Roger de Rattlesden, rector of the church of Cringleford, for a pension of 40 shillings paid by the Hospital of St Giles, superscription of Francis Blomefield on verso, manuscript in Latin, on vellum, 8 lines, folds, slightly browned, lacks seal, 65 x 169mm.,10th July [1252].

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Description: Suffield [Calthorpe] (Walter of, bishop of Norwich, d. 1257) Episcopal instrument by Walter, bishop of Norwich, "our son Roger de Rattlesden, rector of the church of Cringleford has resigned his position into our hands, and we having compassion on his old age have ordained the hospital of St Giles [the Great Hospital of Norwich] to pay a pension of 40 shillings sterling", superscription of Francis Blomefield on verso, manuscript in Latin, on vellum, 8 lines, folds, slightly browned, lacks seal, 65 x 169mm., 10th July seventh year of consecration [1252]. ⁂ An important episcopal instrument relating to a church near Norwich. Walter of Suffield was probably educated at Oxford, and then in Paris where he graduated DCnL and taught as regent master. After his consecration in 1245 he became involved with the governments of Henry III and the Papal Court. On 13 October 1247 he preached in Westminster Abbey at the translation of the relic of the holy blood, and in in January 1252 he was one of the arbitrators between the king and Simon de Montfort concerning the expenses of the latter in Gascony. "Late in 1253 Suffield was commissioned to assess one tenth of ecclesiastical property throughout England, granted by the pope to the king for the Holy Land subsidy". Suffield "proved to be an admirable diocesan bishop, and gained a posthumous reputation of his own for sanctity and miracles. It was noted that he sold many of his own assets to help the poor in a time of famine. At Norwich he founded in 1246 the 'Great' hospital of St Giles, for a master, brethren, and sisters living under a rule, resident poor men and scholars, and for the succour of the transient infirm poor. He was a benefactor of his monastic cathedral chapter, and was remembered by the community with affection, both for his gifts and for his addition to the cathedral of a magnificent lady chapel. He issued several diocesan statutes to supplement those promulgated by his immediate predecessor. It is, however, impossible to distinguish his legislation from that of his successor Simon of Walton, with the single exception of the statute relating to the disposal of tithes in the last testaments of rectors. Some one hundred acta are extant from his episcopate, and these reflect his concern to ensure the provision of effective pastoral ministry in the parishes of East Anglia, by the appointment of resident vicars with decent incomes and security of tenure." - Oxford DNB. Blomefield (Francis, topographical historian and Church of England clergyman, 1705-52).

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East Yorkshire.- Charter, grant by William Bate of Goldale [Gowdall] to Radulphus Formorie of one selion lying in Luindcroft [near Gowdall, East Yorkshire], manuscript in Latin, on vellum, in a fine charter hand, 14 lines, some brown stains, small fragment missing from upper right hand corner, 110 x 180mm., [c. 1250].

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Description: East Yorkshire.- Charter, grant by William Bate of Goldale [Gowdall] to Radulphus Fomorie of one selion lying in Lundcroft [near Gowdall, East Yorkshire], abutting the land of William Assoris to the west, and William Goldig to the east, abutting in the south, lands of John of Goldale, and one selion in Westbrotes, William Golding to the west, John de Heton to the east, abutting the parish of Goldale, paying annually a penny on the Feast of the Purification of Mary [2 February], witnesses: John de Heton, Henry de Heck, Thomas de Snayth, John de Goldale and his brother Edward, and William Goldig, manuscript in Latin, in a fine charter hand, on vellum, 14 lines, lacks seal, some brown stains not affecting legibility, small fragment missing from upper right hand corner, 20th century ink notes on verso, slightly browned, 110 x 180mm., [c. 1250].

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Suffolk, Raydon.- Charter, Robert de Latham [Lafham] grants and confirms to his son Thomas, 15 acres of land called Ware, manuscript in Lation, on vellum, 11 lines, folds, creased, browned, some slight surface wear, lacks seal, 1260.

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Description: Suffolk, [Raydon].- Charter, Robert de Latham [Lafham] grants and confirms to his son Thomas, 15 acres of land called Ware, in the land called Goding with all appurtenances, 9 acres of land called Laifstaresfeld, and 3 acres of land called Alholm with all appurtenances, to him and his heirs, for 12 pence, 6 pence at Easter and 6 pence at Michaelmas, and for this Thomas has done homage and paid 20 shillings, witnesses: Robert son of Robert, Ralph of Keverhil, Hugh son of Ralph, Osbert son of Acelin and others, manuscript in Latin, on vellum, 11 lines, folds, creased, browned, some slight surface wear affecting one or two letters but not obscuring legibility, lacks seal, an attractive charter, 92 x 133mm., [c. 1260]. ⁂ Medieval homage.

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Osgathorpe, Leicestershire.- Charter, Dionisia wife of Simon Pistor of Belton, grants to Geoffrey son of Andrew of Belton and Cecily his wife half an acre of land in Osgathorpe, creased, folds, lacks seal, 115 x 255mm., 1325.

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Description: Leicestershire, Osgathorpe.- Charter, Dionisia, wife of Simon Pistor of Belton, grants to Geoffrey son of Andrew of Belton and Cecily his wife, half an acre of arable land in Osgathorpe, abutting land of Gilbert de ?Cyrloie [?Coleorton] etc., witnesses: William de Wodecot of Osgathorpe and others, manuscript in Latin, on vellum, 14 lines, creased folds, some slight surface soiling not affecting legibility, browned, lacks seal, 115 x 255mm., Osgathorpe, Friday next after the Feast of St Cedde [Chad], [March], 1325.

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Burton-on-Trent & London.-  William de Naples (merchant, of London, fl. 1355-60) Charter, manuscript in Latin, on vellum, slightly creased and browned, 125 x 230mm., Burton-on-Trent, 1355.

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Description: Burton-on-Trent & London.- William de Naples (merchant, of London, fl. 1355-60) Charter, William de Naples, citizen of London, grant to Henry de Leek of Burton-on-Trent and Cecily his wife, a half burgage with tenement on it, in Burton, abutting land of William de Burton and others, witnesses: William de Stapenhall, Robert de Lichfield and others, Stephen de ?Dyderden clerk [?scribe], manuscript in Latin, on vellum, 12 lines, folds, slightly creased and browned, lacks seal, 125 x 230mm., Burton-on-Trent, Wednesday, day after the Feast of St Oswald King and Martyr, [August], 1355. ⁂ On 8 May 1360 William de Naples was the debtor in a case held in front of John Pyel, Mayor of the Westminster Staple, against the creditor John Rayner [Reyner], a citizen and merchant of London for the amount of 40 marks. The case was settled in Rayner's favour and the writ was executed, "We, John Deynes and Walter de Berney {Berneye}, Sheriffs of London, signify that we have delivered to John Rayner all the messuages and shops listed in the writ." The writ refers to a previous one, returnable to Chancery by 01/07/1360, to which the sheriffs had replied that William was not found in their bailiwick and had no goods or chattels there, but he held in the Parish of St Martin within Ludgate and in [the Parish of] St Sepulchre in the Ward of Farringdon [Without] in the suburb of London two messuages and 26 shops for a number of years from the Mayor & Commonalty of the City, and a messuage for his life, which are worth £16 after expenses.

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Dante commentary fragment.- Lana (Jacopo della) Commentary to Dante's Commedia, Northern Italy, mid-fourteenth century.

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Description: Lana (Iacomo or Iacopo della) Commentary to Dante's Commedia, fragment on vellum, Northern Italy, mid-fourteenth century. 200 x 160mm. (fols. 1 and 2) and 200 x 95mm. (fols. 3 and 4), I + 4 + I leaves, leaves mounted on a parchment strip and sewn into a folded early parchment folio (210 x 165 mm), text block: 120 mm (only horizontally), two columns, 26-29 lines, probably blind-ruled, text written in brown ink in chancery hand, three-line blank space for capital on fol. 3v, modern pencil foliation in upper right corner of fols. 3 and 4, right hand column of fols. 3 and 4 cut away, outer margin of fol. 1 somewhat trimmed with loss of some letters, upper margin of fol. 1 and outer margin of fol. 4r frayed, a few holes, affecting a few letters of text at fols. 2 and 4, water-stain to fol. 4, some early underlining of words or phrases in brown ink, later underlining in red pencil, traces of its re-use as binding cover in the sixteenth-century with inked title to inner margins of fols. 2v and 3v 'B 1557 us[que] 1570', inner margins of fols. 1r and 4v with annotations in a sixteenth-century hand, only partly legible, upper margin of fol. 3r with inscription 'Sig[on]r Scipione Barberini' (datable to beginning of the seventeenth century), inner margins of fols. 1v, 2r, 3r-v with calculations in an early hand, modern red morocco folding case, title lettered in gilt on upper cover. ⁂ This important vellum fragment comes from a dismembered manuscript of the Commento by Iacomo della Lana, and contains his commentary to Inferno Canto I, 37 - Canto II 62. The leaves were folded in half and re-used as a binding cover, probably for a register.

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Dante commentary fragment.- Lana (Jacopo della) [Commentary to the Commedia], Northern Italy, mid-fourteenth century.

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Description: Lana (Iacomo or Iacopo della) Commentary to the Commedia, fragment on vellum, Northern Italy, mid-fourteenth century. 370 x 250 mm., single bifolium, used as a binding cover, probably for a register, text block: 255 x 73 mm, two columns, 55-56 lines, first below top line, fol. 1r and 4v. blind-ruled, text written in dark brown ink in a Gothic hand, three-line penwork initial 'S' fol. 3r, capital letters set out and touched with red, rubricated, headings in red ink at centre of upper margin, modern foliation in upper right corner, some holes with loss of some words or letters, tears to the margin of fol. 2 with traces of its re-use as a binding, outer margin of fol. 1v annotation in Italian, partly legible under UV lamp and dated '1600', in a different hand inscription 'Ming[anti]' in margin of fol. 1v. ⁂ A precious vellum fragment - the central bifolium of a quire - from the Commento to the Commedia by the Bolognese Iacomo (or Iacopo) della Lana, one of the most authoritative Dante commentators of the mid-fourteenth century, who composed his vernacular commentary between 1323 and 1328. The fragment (a bifolium from a vellum manuscript, and re-used in the sixteenth century as a binding cover, probably for a notary's register) contains the commentary to Paradiso Canto VI, chapters 47-52 (fol. 1r) and chapters 52-58 (fol. 1v), Paradiso Canto VIII, chapters 9-11 and the glosses to verses 1-13 (fol. 2r) and to verses 13-26 (fol. 2v). The vernacular commentary by Iacomo della Lana circulated widely in Northern Italy and was first printed in 1477 in the famous Venetian Vindeliniana, the first edition of the Commedia to contain a commentary, which was wrongly attributed to Benvenuto da Imola.

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Dante commentary fragment.- Rambaldi (Benvenuto, da Imola) Commentary to Dante's Commedia, ?Northern Italy, late fourteenth century.

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Description: Rambaldi (Benvenuto, da Imola) Commentary to Dante's Commedia, fragment on vellum, ?Northern Italy, late fourteenth century. 320 x 245mm. (fol. 1) and 325 x 230mm. (fols. 2 and 3), three loose leaves, folded and re-used as binding cover for a book in quarto format, text block: ca. 212 x 63mm., two columns, 43-44 lines, first top line, probably blind-ruled, text written in brown ink in pre-humanistic Gothic miniscule hand, Incipit of commentary marked in red ink, with extension, the verses from the Commedia underlined in red, modern pencil foliation in upper right corner, a few small holes, affecting some letters of text, margins rather frayed, especially fol. 1, central lines of text on fol. 1v erased, owing to its re-use as a binding, but legible under UV lamp, further traces of its re-use as binding cover can be seen in the sewings preserved on fol. 2, and in note '1603-1627' written on fol. 1v, inner margin of same leaf with inscription 'Liber primus testamentor[um] p[er] me Her[culem] rogator[um] et rogandor[um], and 'C[arte] 97 con i tre testament[i]' written in the same early hand, fol. 3v with early inked note 'Carte 121 suo iudice', preserved in modern limp vellum folder with ties ⁂ A significant fragment from the Commento to the Commedia by Benvenuto da Imola, one of the most authoritative Dante exegetes from the late fourteenth century. The definitive version of this Latin commentary was composed between 1379 and 1383 and had a wide manuscript circulation in Northern Italy, especially in Bologna, Ferrara, and Mantua. It was first published in 1481, in the Florentine Commedia edited by Cristoforo Landino. The fragment contains Benvenuto's commentary to Paradiso Canto IV, 83-133, and Paradiso Canto X, 5-76. Provenance: Bernard M. Rosenthal's collection.

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T-O World Map.- Lucanus (Marcus Annaeus) Pharsalia, ?Padua, manuscript on paper, first half of 15th century.

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Description: Lucanus (Marcus Annaeus) Pharsalia, manuscript on paper, [Northern Italy (possibly Padua), first half of the fifteenth century]. 294 x 217mm., I + 149 + I leaves (including defective leaves and 3 blanks), sixteen quires, lacking three quires at the beginning and fols 123, 154 and 157, else complete (except that the last 36 leaves are so increasingly fragmentary that very little text remains), collation:1-410, 54-1, 6-910, 1010-1 [of 10, lacking iii], 11-1210, 1310-2, 14-1510, 1610-1, text block: 168 x 100mm., single column, 20 lines, ruled throughout, horizontal catchwords within radiating flourishes, traces of alphabetical leaf signatures, modern pencil foliation taking account of missing leaves and presumed cancels, text written by different scribes mostly in a gothic book-hand, fol. 71 in a sloping humanistic cursive (perhaps an early replacement), the first capital letter of each line set out, rubricated on fols.113v-115r only, simplified T-O map of the world on fol.157v, extensively glossed throughout in various cursive and semi-humanistic hands, some light stains and marginal repairs, the first 113 leaves generally in excellent condition, extensive conservation to the last 36 leaves, by fol.152 marginal defects begin to creep into the text area and from then on the text is increasingly defective so that by fol.179 only inner ribbons survive, all professionally repaired with toned paper, contemporary wooden boards sewn onto three leather thongs (replaced), covered with reversed leather ruled into a frame and saltire pattern, nine metal bosses on upper cover, stubs (only) of two clasps held by pairs of metal pins, trace of title on upper cover '[Lu]canus', lower cover largely replaced by modern wooden boards (by James Brockman), modern vellum endleaves, in a red half calf and marbled paper fitted case, title lettered in gilt on brown leather spine label (chipped). Text: The Pharsalia or De bello civili is Lucan's only surviving work, composed between 59 and his suicide in 65 AD. The poem is divided into ten books and describes the wars between Caesar and Pompey (the place Pharsalus in Thessaly is where Pompey was defeated in 48 B.C.). The present manuscript opens in Book II, line 396, "Umbrosis mediam qua collibus ...", continuing with Books III (fol. 40v), and IV (fol. 60r). This breaks off on fol.70v at line 437; lines 438-450 are in a slightly later hand. There is no Book V and the alphabetical leaf signatures do not allow for it. The poem continues with Books VI (fol. 81r), VII (fol. 102r), VIII (fol. 124r), IX (fol. 145v) and X (fol. 175r). The last leaves are very defective. The ends of the words visible on fol.188v are remains of lines 531-539, which allows for the text to have ended correctly at line 546 on that page. There must have been a verse colophon at the top of fol.189r, of which only a few words remain. Illustration: In the lower margin of fol.157v there is a T-O world map, the best known and most repeated of early cartographic images, illustrating the division of the world into the three continents of Europe, Africa and Asia, with the prevailing winds: the West wind (Zephyrus), the North wind (Boreas), the East wind (Eurus), and the South wind (Notus). Asia is separated from Europe and Africa by the river Tanais (the Don) and the Nile. Lucan was a school text in late antiquity and very popular in the Middle Ages. Dante placed Lucan with Homer, Horace, Ovid, Virgil and himself as the greatest poets of all time (Inferno IV: 88-90). Chaucer includes him in the House of Fame.The present manuscript has been extensively glossed by several different hands. One hand supplies a general running commentary reminiscent of the lecture-hall, another hand (mostly in Book II) is that of a textual critic who supplies alternative readings. A third hand provides geographical and ethnographical data on people, places and rivers mentioned in the poem. A further point of interest lies in the presence of the T-O world map. The tradition of illustrating Lucan with a world map goes back a long way, though not all manuscripts contain it (nor do the early printed editions). It probably served as inspiration for the world map in Isidore of Seville. Despite the defects, this is a substantial, even handsome, and extensively glossed manuscript of the greatest Latin epic after the Aeneid. Literature E. Fantham, "Introduction", in Lucanus, De Bello Civili Book II, Cambridge 1992, pp. 17-19; M. Destombes, Mappemondes, Amsterdam 1964, p. 74

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Statius (Publius Papinius) Achilleide, Northern Italy, manuscript on paper, late 14th century.

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Description: Statius (Publius Papinius, 1st century AD) Achilleide, manuscript on paper, [Northern Italy, late fourteen century]. 281 x 200 mm., i + 34 leaves, unfoliated, complete in three quires, collation: 1-212, 310, blanks: fols. 32v, 33, and 34, text block: 169x100 mm., single column, 19 lines, first above top line, ruled in red ink, text written in brown ink in littera umanistica, numerous interlinear glosses and abundant marginal glosses and/or scholia written in light brown ink in hybrida currens script, first capital letter of each capitulum set out, those on fols. 21v, 22v, 26v showing neat ink drawings of human faces, water-stain at the gutter, some stains, a few wormholes to blank lower margin, some pen trials on front flyleaf and last blank leaves, pencil bibliographical notes to front flyleaf, contemporary brown leather over wooden boards, lower cover with lily-shaped metal clasp with a lamb holding the Christian banner, strap missing, author's name and title ('statius achil.') inked on lower cover, both covers stained, some rubbing and worming, spine damaged at extremities. ⁂ A generally well-preserved manuscript in an unrestored and attractive binding. Text: An important and unrecorded fourteenth-century manuscript of the Achilleide, written by Statius in 95-96 C.E., and left unfinished. The Achilleid enjoyed a wide success in late antiquity and commentaries on it were composed in the Carolingian period and early Middle Ages. The manuscript presents as explicit the spurious verse "aura silet puppis currens ad littora venit", which is found in Statius' manuscript tradition starting from the 11th century. On the recto of the last leaf the anonymous scribe has copied the text of the Epitaphium Achillis (see Riese, Anthologia Latina, I, 2, no. 630), which is attested in two other manuscripts dating from the late fourteenth century, respectively in the Biblioteca Riccardiana in Florence (ms 1223.C) and in the Biblioteca Universitaria in Genoa (ms E.II.8). A further point of interest of the present codex lies in its copious marginalia, glosses and scholia, which offer numerous variant readings. The provenance of this manuscript has an interesting Genoese connection: between the end of the fifteenth and the beginning of the seventeenth century the manuscript passed through the hands of members of the first families of the Genoa Republic: the D'oria (or Doria), Spinola and Grimaldi families. Among these owners the name of Giovanni Battista Grimaldi is especially noteworthy. In his palace in Genoa he assembled a beautiful library, which included Latin classical texts as well as contemporary vernacular works, and his humanist preceptor Claudio Tolomei (ca. 1492-1556) had an important role in forming the collection. He paid great attention to the bindings of his volumes, and employed the best and most sought after binders such as Niccolò Franzese and Marcantonio Guillery. Grimaldi was a friend of Niccolò Spinola, whose ownership inscription is also to be found in this manuscript: it is therefore possible to hypothesise an exchange of books between these two distinguished Genoese patricians. Provenance: Andreolo D'Oria (fifteenth-century ownership inscription on recto of front flyleaf 'Nobili Domino Andriolo de Auria'; Niccolò Spinola (sixteenth-century ownership inscription on recto of front flyleaf 'Nicolaus Spinula me possidet'; Giovanni Battista Grimaldi (1524-1612; ownership inscription on verso of fol. 33 'Gio: Batt[ist]a Grimaldo'; Alessandro [Grimaldi ?] (ownership inscription on verso of fol. 34 'Alexandro', maybe the son of Giovanni Battista Grimaldi). Literature: P. M. Clogan, "A Preliminary List of Manuscripts of Statius' Achilleid"; Idem, The Medieval Achilleid of Statius edited with Introduction, Variant Readings, and Glosses, Leiden 1968; H. Anderson, The Manuscripts of Statius, Washington, D.C. 2000; A. Hobson, Apollo and Pegasus. An Enquiry into the Formation and Dispersal of a Renaissance Library, Amsterdam 1975.

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Medieval Travels in the Holy Land and Middle East.- Gucci (Giorgio) Viaggio in Oriente, Florence, autograph manuscript, 1385-92.

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Description: Gucci (Giorgio, 1350-1392) Viaggio in Oriente: visit to the holy sites and places of Egypt, Sinai, Palestine, and Syria in 1384, autograph manuscript on paper, in Italian, 35 leaves complete (the first blank but numbered), written in a mercantile, humanistic script by a late 14th-century hand, in brown ink, justification 185 x 130 mm, on 42 lines, without catchwords, original foliation in pen at upper corner, watermark similar to Briquet nos. 7373-7378 (motif: fruit in the form of a pear or fig accompanied by 2 leaves, known to have been used in Florence and Siena from 1335-1380), some stains and foxing, but overall a very good copy on strong paper, 19th-century half vellum over brown marbled paper boards, small 4to (230 x 160mm), Florence, [1385-1392]. ⁂ Previously unknown autograph manuscript by Giorgio Gucci. The manuscript contains the full, presumably autograph, account of the famous journey to the Holy Land made by the Florentine Giorgio Gucci between 1384 and 1385. The terminus post quem for dating this codex is the end of the journey on 31st May, 1385 (fol. 30v), the terminus ante quem is Gucci's death in 1392. Other Gucci autographs are present in the Archivio di Stato, in Florence, Atti dell'esecutore, 1166, fols. 2v-35r; 1167, fols. 43v-44r; 1168, fols. 5r-10v; 1170, fol. 55r. Text Fol. 2r Fol. 35v Incipit: Al nome sia dell onipotente Iddio e del suo santissimo e dolcissimo figliuolo gieso christo il quale col suo proprio sangue humana natura ricomperò. Explicit: tornati in Firenze spendemo per un col suo famiglio duchati trecento doro e più. Amen. The Author Giorgio Gucci was born in Florence in 1350, son of Guccio of Dino and Francesca of Lippo Spini. He lived in the parish of Ognissanti ('All Saints'), near the Church of Saint Lucia. A father of four children, he followed the family tradition by entering the Arte della Lana (the Wool Merchants Guild) in 1377. In 1379 he accepted the Priorate of the Florentine Republic and four years later, in 1383, he was re-elected to this important task. As Priore he was sent on an embassy to Rome to plead with Pope Urban VI on behalf of the cause of the Florentine bishop Angelo Ricasoli. Furthermore, between 1388-1391, Gucci represented his Commune on four diplomatic missions to Pisa. After a period of imprisonment, Gucci held several public offices of the Republic: he was a member of the Sei della Mercanzia ('Six Merchants', 1387-1388), of the Dodici Buonuomini ('Twelve Good Fellows') and, ultimately, of the Sedici Gonfalonieri ('Sixteen Gonfaloniers', 1392). He died early in the night of 19th/20th October 1392 while returning home from the Palazzo della Signoria, killed by two assassins who were probably sent by his brother Thomas. The Journey In the late 14th century a group of Florentines, who usually met together in the Augustinian convent of the Holy Spirit, conceived and organised a journey to the Holy Land to visit the sacred sites and towns, which also had close trade and commercial ties with Florence. The group, formed among others by Giorgio Gucci, Leonardo Frescobaldi and Andrea Rinuccini (each with their own famiglio, i.e. servant), left from Venice - where they joined up with Antonio of Paolo Mei, Simone Sigoli and Santi del Ricco - in August 1384. Gucci, Frescobaldi and Rinuccini each brought 400 ducats and had letters of credit with them for another 300 ducats to be redeemed at commercial agents of Portinaru operating in the cities they visited. The group also had a 'common fund' that was entrusted to Gucci (and in fact the text, in all its different versions, contains a detailed list of the related expenses). Their journey lasted more than a year: they travelled through Egypt (Alexandria, Cairo, the Pyramids), visiting the Monastery of Saint Catherine at Sinai, continuing to Jerusalem, Bethlehem, Galilee and Beirut. The group re-embarked to return to Italy after a long stay in Damascus, where one of the travellers, Andrea Rinuccini, had fallen ill and died. Frescobaldi, Signoli and Gucci each made their own description of this enterprise. Gucci in particular gave a very detailed and vivid account showing his devotion, religiosity and experience as a merchant and businessman, always attentive to the characteristics of the places they visited, noting the goods on the market, the way of life and habits of the inhabitants. Being a merchant, he is also consistently precise in reporting numerical data such as weights, measures and prices, also providing a detailed list of expenses at the end of the text. With regard to the Muslim world and its customs, Gucci, although not immune to the typical preconceptions of the time, almost always shows a deep curiosity, which leads him to describe rather than to criticise. Even when he disapproves, or, sometimes, is disgusted, he is often more aesthetic than ethical. The figure of Gucci as a pilgrim and author was well synthesised by Cardini (1982, p. 170) who describes him as: 'a common man not cultured but intelligent, shrewd, practical, observant, suspicious and above all, curious and friendly towards the innovations he fell upon during the trip' (Nelly 2003). The Manuscript Tradition of the Viaggio: Gucci's Viaggio was first published by Gargiolli in 1862 and more recently superseded by a critical edition by Troncatelli in 1990. This edition is based on three, at that time known, manuscripts. Of these three witnesses, one contains only the final part of the text, with the detailed list of the expenses (Florence, Biblioteca Riccardiana, Ms. Ricc. 1998). The other two manuscripts are thought to be complete. Both are also preserved in Florence, but in the Biblioteca Laurentiana, with shelf mark Plut. 42.30 (= P) and Gadd.180 (= G). Moreover, there is another family of manuscripts containing a different version, designated by Delfiol 1982 as F-G, which is in fact a 'compendium' of the two accounts written by Frescobaldi and Gucci. These manuscripts are also kept in Florence, National Library, ms. Fior. Naz. II.IV. 102, ms. Palat. 661, ms. CS C.VII.1753 and ms. CS J.IV.9; Florence, Biblioteca Riccardiana, ms. Ricc. 2822; and one in Venice, Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana, ms. Marc. 5727 (see Delfiol 1982, 139-176). After their return to Florence, the first to record the journey was Leonardo Frescobaldi, who sketched, as Bartolini 1991 observes, a compendious account; next and somewhat later both Gucci and Sigoli wrote their detailed reports. After their versions appeared, Frescobaldi felt impelled to compose a more elaborate text, which is however, in many places, only a combination of Gucci and Sigoli's works. The newly discovered manuscript presented here (= R) differs from P and G in a number of details, such as the lack of rubrication (present in P) or the lack of the explicit (present only in G), aside from several textual variants. But the 'new' and decisive element of R is the presence of a paragraph missing in P and in G. This passage is of the greatest importance as it demonstrates that Giorgio Gucci himself must have written the codex. This paragraph reads: « [fol. 1r] Questo quaderrno fecie Giorgio di messer Ghuccio del popolo di Sancya Lucia d'Ogni Santi di Firenze, al presente abitante nel popolo di San Branchatio e chiamasi il quaderno delle ricerche de sagri e sancti luoghi e divoti dove io in prima io denoterò tutti I sancti e sagri luoghi ch'io trovai nel vil // [fol. 1v] aggio ch'io feci per la di Dio gratia del sagro e sancto Sipolcro e di sancta Chaterina e del Monte Sinai e di più altro divoti luoghi che in quello sancto viaggio trovamo second che miei compagni e io in ditto viaggio per iscrittura ne recamo e appresso scrivemo tutti I sagri e sancti chessono a Roma di che si fa mentione e ch'io ricerchai in una quarantine ch'I vi stetti l'anno del Mccclxxxiii e così seguiterò in suddetto quaderno dinotando tutti I sacri e sancti luoghi ch'io per lo passato o cierchi [sic]in qualunque parte si sieno e così quelli ch'io per lo avenire per la Dio gratia cierchassi e tenere questa scrittura dell'ammiratione e memoria dei detti sacri e sancti luoghi cierchi o ch'io cercassi narrerò tutte le città dove io sono stato e i luoghi notabili elle cose notabili ch'io vedute o udite anche per lo passato e così tutte le città, luoghi notabili e cose notabili che per lo avenire cercassi o vedessi. Amen. » [Translation: This book was written by George of Sir Ghuccio from the parish of Saint Lucy of All Saints of Florence, at present resident in the parish of St. Branchatio [St. Pancratio], and is called the book of the [re]search of sacred, holy and devout places, where I first will denote all the sacred and saints' places I have found on the journey I undertook, for the grace of God, to the Holy Sepulchre and Saint Catherine and Mount Sinai and other devout places that we found during the journey, as I and my fellow travellers wrote, and here below I write about all the saints that were mentioned in Rome and that I looked for, about forty, when I stood there in 1383; and so I will continue in this notebook describing all the sacred and saints' places I searched for in the past, wherever they are, and also the ones I will search for in the future by the grace of God, and I will keep this writing in admiration and memory of these sacred and devout places]. It is particularly noteworthy that Giorgio Gucci speaks here in the first person, while in the report he normally uses the personal pronoun 'we'. Furthermore he provides some unknown autobiographical details, e.g. that while writing the manuscript he was not living at the family home in the parish of Ognissanti, but 'at present' in a house in San Pancrazio (or Brancazio, as the Florentines used to say). Gucci also clarifies the reasons that led him to participate in the journey, among which he underlines the wish to discover the 'traces' or relics of about forty saints, a topic discussed during his embassy to Rome in 1383 (see above). Also of interest are the medieval ownership inscriptions. These notes refer to two important protagonists of Florentine political life: Berto of Leonardo Berti and his son Pietro. Berto was elected Prior in 1416, while his son Pietro entered the Priorate in 1461-1462. But indirectly it also refers to Leonardo, Berto's father, who held public offices too. He was an apothecary (as were his descendants) and was named Gonfaloniere in the Florence government in 1381, precisely the same year that Gucci was also in office. Was this manuscript perhaps therefore given by Gucci to his 'colleague' Leonardo Berti and handed down in that family? Provenance: 1. Original text written by the author in Florence, c.1385-1392, this manuscript may be an autograph by the author himself. 2. On the recto of the first blank leaf brown ink drawings (a head and an escutcheon), motto: 'O tu che colmiolibro ti trastulli gharlando da lla lucerna et da fançulli' (you who play with my book, please preserve it from fire and children). 3. On the verso of the same leaf, early 15th-century ownership inscriptions 'Questo libro si è de Berto de Lionardo Berti et de suo [erede ?]' (this book belongs to Berto of Lionardo Berti and of his [heir?]). Priory in Florence, in 1417, 1429. 4. Schloss Maienfeld/Graubünden, Baron von Salis, 19th-century inscription. Literature: The manuscript is hitherto unpublished. Editions and studies on the Viaggio: C. Gargiolli, Viaggi in Terra Santa di Lionardo Frescobaldi e d'altri del secolo 14. Firenze 1862. M. Troncatelli, Pellegrini scrittori. Viaggiatori toscani del Trecento in Terrasanta, Firenze 1990. G. Bartolini & F. Cardini, Nel nome di Dio facemmo vela. Viaggio in Oriente di un pellegrino medievale, Roma/Bari 1991. R. Delfiol, Su alcuni problemi codicologico-testuali concernenti le realzioni di pellegrinaggio fiorentine del 1384, in: Toscana e Terrasanta nel Medioevo, ed. by F. Cardini, Firenze 1982, 139-176. Renzo Nelli on: Giorgio Gucci, in Dizionario biografico degli Italiani, Volume 60 (2003) http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/giorgio-gucci_%28Dizionario-Biografico%29/ See on Berto di Leonardo Berti : Archive of the Opera di Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence, The years of the Cuppola, 1417-1436 (digital archive: Margaret Haines, Max Planck Institute, Berlin)

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Kabbala.- Gikatilla (Yosef Ben Abraham) Two Kabbalistic Treatises, Italy, fifteenth century.

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Description: Gikatilla (Yosef ben Abraham) Two Kabbalistic treatises, manuscript on paper, scribe: Shabbetai Kohen (subscription on fol. 15r), [Italy, fifteenth century]. 135 x 104mm., pagination: I + II original flyleaves +106 + I, complete in 12 quires, collation: 14, 26, 38, 48, 510, 610, 710, 812, 98, 108, 1110, 1210, (entire volume resewn when rebound, some leaves pasted onto recto of the following leaf, original front flyleaves mounted on strong paper but counted), blanks: fols. 13v, 14r-18v, early inked foliation in upper right corner of each verso leaf, indicating 373-480 (manuscript was once part of a larger volume), early inked foliation in upper right corner of first 42 leaves of the second codicological unit, modern pencil foliation, text block: 90 x 77 mm., single column, 14 lines, ruled in dry point, text written in brown ink, in Italian semi-cursive script (a different hand has added the punctuation on fols. 2v-5r), in square script the Hebrew alphabet on verso of final leaf, catchwords indicating first word of each folio horizontally inscribed on preceding one at inner margin below the end of the written text, generally in good condition but largely water-stained, darkened edges, copiously annotated in Latin by Cardinal Aegidius of Viterbo, a few notes on the attribution of the works herein to Yosef Gikatilla on recto of second leaf, dated 16 April 1861, and 'V. De Rossi Codici Mss N.r 1235', referring to a similar manuscript preserved in the Palatina Library in Parma, and described by Giovanni Battista De Rossi in his catalogue of that collection, two unidentified stamps on recto of third leaf and at end, late 19th-century dark blue vertical-grain cloth, spine lettered 'Montefiore 122' in gilt, upper joint cracked. ⁂ A significant fifteenth-century manuscript containing two kabbalistic works ascribed to the famous Castilian kabbalist Yosef ben Gikatilla (1248 - after 1305), born in Medinaceli and a former pupil of Abraham Abulafia. He was a prolific writer and contributed significantly to the diffusion, through Spain, of the kabbalistic doctrines in Italy and other European countries. Among his numerous kabbalistic treatises the Share'are Orah or Sefer ha-Orah, translated into Latin by Paulus Ricius under the title of Portae Lucis, is especially noteworthy. Another feature of importance of this manuscript lies in its early ownership: as the copious annotations in his own hand attest, the volume belonged to the leading humanist and Christian hebraist Aegidius da Viterbo (1469-1532), who was General of the Augustinian Order from 1506-1518 and later Cardinal. He was keenly interested in Kabbalah, and for ten years offered hospitality to the well-known Hebrew philologist Elijah Levita (1469-1532) in his Roman palace. Levita introduced him to the knowledge of Hebrew language and the mysteries of Jewish mysticism. Further, he collected and translated kabbalistic manuscripts for his patron, and the name of Yoseph Gikatilla is frequently quoted by Aegidius in his writings Schechinah and the Libellus de Litteris Hebraicis. The present manuscript provides important autograph evidence of Aegidius' method of studying kabbalistic texts. Furthermore, it adds a new and important piece of information about the history of Aegidius's private library, which was almost entirely dispersed during the sack of Rome (1527). Text: fols. 1r-13r: Luach lechochmah ha-kabalah, literally the 'blackboard of the wisdom of Kabbalah', a short description of the ten sephirot, ascribed here to the Castilian Kabbalist Yosef Gikatilla fols. 19r-98v: Sha'ar ha-Shamayim or Sha'ar ha-Zedek, by Yosef Gikatilla, a detailed explanation of the sephirot, introduced by six verses; seven verses on fol. 98v. The work appeared for the first time in print in Riva in 1561. fols. 99r-106v: Sermon on the Tetragram. Provenance: 1. Cardinal Aegidius of Viterbo (c.1469-1532); marginalia in his own hand. 2. a certain Rafael, member of the Sephardic family Nahmias, in all likelihood resident in Rome (ownership inscription, probably datable to the late seventeenth century on recto of second leaf, and the note 'lo venduto a Rafael namias'). 3. the British banker Moses Montefiore (1784-1885); bequeathed by him to the Library of the Jews College, London (small label on front pastedown ''; see H. Hirschfeld, Descriptive Catalogue of the Hebrew Mss. of the Montefiore Library, London 1904, no. 319; Important Manuscripts from the Montefiore Endowment, New York, Sotheby's October 27 & 28, 2004, New York 2004, lot 392, in neither case mentioning Aegidius' marginalia). Literature: R. J. Wilkinson, Orientalism, Aramaic, and Kabbalah in the Catholic Reformation. The First Printing of the Syrian New Testament, Leiden 2007, p. 9; A. Tura, "Un codice ebraico di cabala appartenuto a Egidio da Viterbo", Bibliothèque d'Humanisme et Renaissance, 68 (2006) pp. 535-543; M. Palumbo, "I codici postillati di Egidio da Viterbo, dal Sant'Uffizio alla Casanatense" in Egidio da Viterbo cardinale agostiniano tra Roma e l'Europa del Rinascimento, Roma 2014, pp. 299-322: 322.

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Greek manuscript.- Chrysoloras (Manuel) Erotemata, manuscript on paper, ?Venice, late fifteenth century.

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Description: Chrysoloras (Manuel) Erotemata, decorated manuscript on paper, in Greek, [Italy (?Venice), late fifteenth - early sixteenth century]. 150 x 101 mm., I + 193 leaves, unfoliated, twenty-four quires, collation:16, 28, 38-2, 48, 58, 612, 78, 88, 98, 108, 118, 128, 138, 148, 158, 168, 1710, 188, 198, 208, 218, 228, 238, 248-1, lacking two blank ff. in quire 3 and one blank leaf in final quire, blanks: fols. 9-14, 32, 120, 132-134, 187v, 188-192, text block: 113x70 mm., single column, 14 lines, text written in black ink in a cursive Greek hand, headings and initials of each section in red ink, numerous borders in Greek style with interlaced designs, mostly painted in yellow and red, generally in good condition but browned, water-stained and spotted in places, numerous traces of use, a few early ink stains, some wormholes, affecting text only in first quires, pastedowns and flyleaves copiously annotated in different Greek hands, contemporary, probably Venetian, brown morocco, over wooden boards, covers framed within blind border of fillets and roundels, blind lozenge composed of fillets and roundels, at the centre small floral tool, spine with five raised bands, compartments decorated with blind roundels, traces of ties, purple bookmark, leather turn-ins visible on inside of boards, old repair to the lower corner of rear cover, joints rather cracked, especially lower one (with loss of leather), lower cover somewhat abraded ⁂ An interesting manuscript, containing the Greek Donatus, i.e. the elementary Greek grammar composed by the Cretan philologian Manuel Chrysoloras (c.1350-1415) according to the traditional method of questions and answers, called 'erotematic'. It was the most influential and popular Greek grammatical textbook throughout the Italian Renaissance. The work had a very complex textual transmission, with the simultaneous circulation of the original and longer version, and an abridged text, written between 1417-1418 by Chrysoloras' pupil Guarinus from Verona (1374-1460). Guarinus' epitome enjoyed great success, especially in Italy, determining an inextricable tangle in the tradition of the Erotemata, both in manuscript and in print. Numerous 'contaminated' versions are also recorded. It is generally believed that the most ancient extant copy of the Erotemata in original version is the cod. Vat. Pal. Gr.116 in the Vatican Library. The first printed edition of the grammar appeared in Florence in 1496, but manuscript copies were still widespread in the early sixteenth century. The present manuscript, perhaps produced in Venice and decorated with typical Greek interlaced borders, is of the longer version of the Erotemata, whose text is however supplemented by other grammatical texts. Literature: A. Rollo, "Problemi e prospettive della ricerca su Manuele Crisolora" in R. Maisano - A Rollo (eds.), Manuele Crisolora e il ritorno del greco in Occidente, Napoli 2002, pp. 31-85; L. Thorn-Wickert, Manuel Chrysoloras, Frankfurt a.M. 2006.

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Antiphoner.- manuscript on vellum, 110ff., in original binding, Spain, early 16th century.

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Description: Antiphoner.- manuscript in Latin on vellum, Spain, early 16th century. 110ff. only (of 111, lacking fol. lxv), text written in black and red, most leaves with music on 5 4-line red staves, bar lines in yellow, numerous single-stave initials in red, blue and yellow, occasionally in green, a few larger 2-stave initials in red and blue, some with decorative pen-work in the other colour, foliation in red in upper right corner, many leaves yellowed, some staining, a few repairs, the old ones with stitching, more recent with sellotape, a few pieces of vellum replaced or repaired, contemporary reversed calf over wooden boards, gilt metal corner- and side-pieces, covers each with 5 bosses (4 near corners and one central), covers rather worn and with some worming, lacking clasps, spine repaired, elephant folio (825 x 560mm.), [Spain, early 16th century]. ⁂ A typically monumental antiphoner in original binding.

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St. John the Baptist, miniature on a leaf from the Chester Beatty Book of Hours, Paris, 1408.

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Description: St. John the Baptist, Miniature on a leaf from the illuminated manuscript on vellum known as the Chester Beatty Book of Hours, with a text leaf from the same manuscript, [Paris, 1408]. c.174 x 130mm., full-page miniature in a full floral and foliate border, including a three-line illuminated initial and four lines of text, on reverse 15-line text in single column, framed within the same border, illuminated initials on gold ground and line endings, plus a text leaf, also c.174 x 130mm., single column, 15 lines, framed in the same border, numerous illuminated initials and line endings, excellent condition, lower margin slightly water-stained, housed in a double glass wooden frame. ⁂ A splendid miniature leaf from the famous Chester Beatty Book of Hours (probably from the section containing the Suffrage), illuminated by the Mazarine Master, here offered with a text leaf from the same manuscript. The Chester Beatty Book of Hours, in the past also ascribed to the Boucicaut Master, is one the few securely dated manuscripts belonging to this typology. As its colophon states, "factum et completum est anno M° CCCC Viji" quo ceciderunt pontes par[isius]", i.e. made in 1408, the year the bridges of Paris were swept away by floods" (a similar inscription is to be found in the Belles Heures, Ms Douce 144 of the Bodleian Library in Oxford). The Mazarine Master, so called after the Book of Hours produced by him now in the Bibliothèque Mazarine in Paris (ms 469), was one of the most significant and influential artists active in Paris in the early years of the fifteenth century, until about 1430. He was a contemporary of the Limbourg Brothers, and worked for a highly distinguished clientele, including the greatest collectors of the age, like Jean, Duc de Berry. Both the miniature leaf and the text leaf are framed in an exquisite border, executed by a skilled craftman working for the Mazarine Master, which represents one of the earliest appearances of the acanthus decoration in Parisian manuscript illustration. The patron who commissioned the Mazarine Master to execute this marvellous Book of Hours is still unknown. In the nineteenth century the manuscript was in the hands of the jeweller John Boykett Jarman (d.1864). His collection had been damaged by flooding in 1846 (as the water-stains around the edges of the present leaves still testify), and was sold in his sale at Sotheby's, on 13th June 1864, to Edward Arnold. In Arnold's sale at Sotheby's again on 6th May 1929 the Mazarine Master Book of Hours was bought for £190 by Sir Alfred Chester Beatty, who divided it up and mounted the miniature leaves separately. He sold several of them on 22nd March 1932 at Sotheby's, and the present miniature was lot 326. The other illuminated leaves remained in Chester Beatty's collection and were in his sale at Sotheby's on 24th June 1969. Provenance: - John Boykett Jarman (d.1864): his sale, Sotheby's, 13 June 1864, lot 47 (for the complete manuscript). - Edward Arnold, his sale, Sotheby's, 6 May, 1929, lot 240 (for the complete manuscript). - Sir Alfred Chester Beatty (1875-1968): his MS. W. 103. Chester Beatty had most of the miniatures, including this one, separately mounted, and some were dispersed during his lifetime. His sale, Sotheby's, 22 March 1932, lot 326 (this sale included six miniatures from the manuscript, all contained in similar elaborate frames. The most expensive was the Presentation in the Temple (£7.5s to Maggs) and the miniatures of St John and St Paul each sold for the second highest price, £7 to Schoyer and Cresswick respectively). - Estelle S. Doheny, and then given to the present owner in 1987 by the Archdiocese of Los Angeles in recognition of her service as curator of the Doheny Collection. Literature: J. A. Backhouse, "A Victorian Connoisseur and his manuscripts: the Tale of Mr Jarman and Mr Wing", British Museum Quarterly 32 (1968), pp. 76-92; G. Bartz, Der Boucicaut Meister. Ein unbekanntes Stundenbuch, Rotthalmünster 1999; E. Taburet-Delahaye - F. Avril, Paris 1400. Les arts sous Charles VI, Paris 2004, pp. 280-287. Two corrections in the provenance:  Estelle S. Doheny should read Estelle Doheny.  The full title of her Library is ‘The Estelle Doheny Collection of Rare Books and Manuscripts’

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Book of Hours, 100ff., 13 large miniatures, Southern Flanders, second half of 15th century.

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Description: Book of Hours, use of Rome. Illuminated manuscript on vellum, [Southern Flanders (Bruges?), second half of the fifteenth century]. 160 x 115 mm. II + 98 + I leaves, unfoliated, thirteen quires, collation: 12, 28, 36, 48, 58, 68, 78, 88, 96, 108, 118, 128, 132, last two leaves mounted on a parchment strip, blank: fol. 72, text block: 92 x 62 mm., single column, 18 lines, first below top line, ruled in purple ink, with full-length horizontal and vertical bounding lines, text written in dark brown ink and red in a gothic book-hand, Calendar with names of months and major feasts in red ink, decorated with thirteen large arch-topped miniatures with full elaborate borders of semi-naturalistic acanthus leaves and flowers in colours and gold, each incorporating a five-line illuminated initial with acanthus leaves on liquid gold, with text, one five-line illuminated initial on fol. 28r in liquid gold on a blue and red ground, numerous one or two-line initials painted in gold on grounds of red and blue (occasionally with extension), one-line penwork initials throughout, line endings in red and blue, borders of the miniatures lightly cropped, the lower right corners of them slightly rubbed from use, short tear on fols. 14 and 17, otherwise in excellent condition, twentieth-century olive morocco, covers with three gilt fillets, at the centre small fleuron composed of different gilt tools, spine with five raised bands emphasised by dotted fillets, compartments gilt-tooled, title lettered in gilt, inner gilt dentelles, housed in a modern pale blue cloth clamshell case, with title in gilt lettering on morocco label (spine detached). ⁂ This luxurious Book of Hours - the popular medieval prayer book designed for laymen - was produced in Southern Flanders, possibly in Bruges, the main centre of Flemish book production in the second half of the fifteenth century. The Calendar contains mention of local feast days and saints especially venerated in this area, such as St Aldegardis Virginis and the bishop Willebrordius, providing further valuable clues, along the ownership inscription in a Flemish hand on the verso of the last leaf, as to its likely place of production. The manuscript is decorated with thirteen full-page miniatures, inserted at the relevant sections of the Hours, mostly accompanying the Hours of the Virgin and based on well-established iconographic models. The decoration, the intense and distinctive colouring, the clear images, the naturalistic taste, and the floral motifs in the borders recall the style of the atelier of the famous illuminator Willem Vrelant, born in Utrecht but active in Bruges from 1454 to 1482. He worked for the Burgundian Court, and was a successful and prolific artist. Vrelant's style was imitated by other illuminators "that it remains difficult to draw a firm line between the œuvre of the Master and that of his followers" (G. Dogaer, Flemish Miniature Painting, p. 99). Text: fols. 1r-12v, Calendar fols. 13r-15v, Hours of the Holy Spirit fols. 16r-18v, Hours of the Cross fols. 19r-27v, Mass of the Blessed Virgin Mary fols. 28r-32v, The prayer to the Virgin 'O intemerata' fols. 33r-71v, Hours of the Virgin fols. 73r-93v, The Penitential Psalms and Litany followed by petitions fols. 93r-98v, Office of the Dead Illustration: The subjects of the full-page miniatures are: fol. 13r: Pentecost fol. 16r: Crucifixion fol. 19r: Virgin and Child fol. 33r: Annunciation fol. 41v: Visitation fol. 50v: Nativity fol. 54r: Annunciation to the Shepherds fol. 57r: Adoration of the Magi fol. 60r: Presentation in the Temple fol. 63r: Massacre of the Innocents fol. 68r: Flight into Egypt fol. 73r: Ascension fol. 93r: Funeral Service Provenance: Contemporary ownership inscription on verso of final leaf, in a Flemish hand, 'desen boeck hoert too van [?] en gheest haer weder om gote', possibly revealing a female ownership; Albert Ehrman (1890-1969), British book collector; his monogram stamp on rear pastedown, with the notice 'Ms I. 633'; booklabel of the Broxbourne Library on front pastedown); Menno Hertzberger, bookseller in Amsterdam (label on front pastedown); Robert Walsingham Martin (1871-1961; bookplate pasted on a vellum strip between front pastedown and flyleaf); by descent to his daughter Marie Martin; sold in the 1980s to John F. Fleming; sold 1986 to Robert and Joan Cremin. Literature: G. Dogaer, Flemish Miniature Painting in the 15th and 16th Centuries, Amsterdam, 1987; Th. Kren - S. McKendrick (eds.), Illuminating the Renaissance. The Triumph of Flemish Manuscript Painting in Europe, Los Angeles 2003; T. Delcourt - B. Bousmanne (eds.), Miniatures flamandes 1404-1482, Paris-Brussels 2011.

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Book of Hours, use of Rouen, 110ff., 12 large miniatures, Rouen, c.1485-90.

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Description: Book of Hours, use of Rouen. Illuminated manuscript on vellum, in French and Latin, [Rouen, c. 1485-1490]. 160 x 113 mm., II + 110 + I leaves, unfoliated, thirteen quires, collation: 112, 212-1, 38, 48, 58, 68, 78, 88, 98-1, 108, 118, 128, 138, blank: fol. 26, 73v, 76r, 110, lacking two miniature leaves between fols. 15-16 and 72-73, otherwise complete, fols. 13-15 misbound, text block: 92 x 58 mm., single column, 18 lines, first below top line, ruled in red ink, with full-length horizontal and vertical bounding lines, catchwords written vertically in inner lower margin, text written in dark brown ink and red in a batarde book-hand, names of months and major feasts in Calendar in gold ink, decorated with twelve large arch-topped miniatures, all but one with full floral and foliate borders, all text pages with side borders of flowers, fruits and leaves on unpainted grounds, numerous one or two-line initials on grounds alternating red, blue, and gold, line endings painted in gold on red or blue ground, a few miniatures slightly oxidized in places, but generally in excellent condition, handsome French eighteenth-century red morocco, similar in style to bindings executed by the workshop of Nicolas-Denis Derôme, known as Derôme le Jeune (1731-1790), covers framed within a gilt dentelle, elaborate fleuron at the centre, composed of two crowns, stars, and floral motifs, spine with five small raised bands, compartments richly decorated in gilt, inner gilt dentelles, marbled pastedowns and flyleaves, in comb pattern, minor wear to extremities, preserved in an eighteenth-century velvet-lined brocade bag, somewhat worn, and housed in modern red morocco-backed case, title lettered in gilt. ⁂ A lavishly illuminated Book of Hours, produced in the last decades of the fourteenth century in Rouen, France. The charming manuscript was commissioned by an unidentified but highly distinguished woman, as the final full-page miniature depicting the patroness adoring the Virgin and Child bears witness. Women predominated as owners of Books of Hours, and patronesses could request a personalised example, with the choice of particular subjects for the illustrative apparatus, and the inclusion in the opening Calendar of favoured or local saints. This manuscript contains twelve large miniatures in typical late fifteenth-century Rouen style. Characteristic features include the detailed patterning of textiles, the elaborate architectural constructions, and the borders with sprays of naturalistic flowers and fruits, framing the miniatures as well as the text. Only the miniature on fol. 27r, showing the Annunciation, is within a gilt architectural frame of flanking polygonal piers, each with a canopied statue. Text: fols. 1r-12v: Calendar, in French fols. 13r-22r: extracts from Gospels included in the Mass recited on major feast days, and prayers fols. 22r-25r, the prayer to the Virgin 'O intemerata' fols. 27r-58v: Hours of the Virgin fols 59r-73r: The Penitential Psalms and Litany followed by petitions . fols.: 74r-101v: Office of the Dead. fol. 102r-109v: prayers in French Illustration: The subjects of the full-page miniatures are: fol. 13e: Coronation of the Virgin fol. 27r: Annunciation fol. 35v: Visitation fol. 44v : Nativity fol. 48v : Annunciation to the Shepherds fol.51v: Adoration of the Magi fol. 54r: Presentation in the Temple fol. 56v: Flight into Egypt fol. 59r: David with harp, praying fol. 76v: Pentecost fol. 79v: Funeral Service fol. 103r Patroness and Angels adoring the enthroned Virgin and Child Provenance: John A. Saks (1913-1983), American book collector; bookplate on verso of front marbled flyleaf; sale Christie's New York, 20 May 1983, lot 45, $9,350 to John F. Fleming for Robert and Joan Cremin.

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Book of Hours, use of Rome.-  Illuminated manuscript on vellum, Florence, c.1470.

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Description: Book of Hours, use of Rome. Illuminated manuscript in Latin on vellum, [Florence, c.1470]. 120 x 79mm., I + 301 + I leaves, unfoliated, three blank, 16 leaves added in the sixteenth century, further single blanks cancelled after fols. 277 and 295, lacking two leaves after fol. 27, else complete, thirty-one quires, collation: 112+10, (fols. 1-2 and 15-22 added around the quire in the sixteenth century), 28+1 (of 10+1), 3-1110, 122, 1310+1, 14-1910, 2010+1, 21-2210, 232, 2410+1, 25-2710, 2810-1, (last blank cancelled), 2910+1, 308-1, (last blank cancelled), 316 (added in the sixteenth century), text block: 62 x 42mm, 12 lines, horizontal catchwords with calligraphic surround, text written in dark brown ink in a gothic liturgical hand, rubricated throughout, headings in burnished gold, numerous three-line penwork initials in colours on burnished gold grounds extending the full-length of the page into upper and lower margins, seven three-line historiated initials in leafy design in colours on burnished gold grounds with full-length borders of multi-coloured floral stems and leaves infilled with gold dots within bursts of radiating penwork, five six-to-seven line historiated initials in multi-coloured leafy surrounds on burnished gold with full borders of flowers, leaves, vases and putti, each with several small cartouches in burnished gold frames enclosing miniatures, five full-page miniatures added to face the historiated initials, in colours and liquid gold, with gold borders within a further border with liquid gold acanthus scrolls, pearls and other classical motifs, full-page drawing added c.1572 to front flyleaf depicting the Virgin and Child with St. Anne in the style of an engraving, with the title for the book in cartouche above, manuscript generally in very good condition, some rubbing and thumbing, extremities of full borders occasionally lightly cropped, a few signs of use, lower margin of fol.4r with a few contemporary annotations, probably additions to the Calendar, later plain calf (probably 17th century), lacking clasps, binding slightly wormed, upper joint repaired. Provenance: - Two coats-of-arms at foot of fol.23v and 24r. On the left of each page arms of the family Gucci di Dino of Florence (see Crollalanza, Dizionario Storico-Blasonico, 1886, p. 511). The red Calendar signals St. Zenobius of Florence (25th May) and he is invoked in the short Litany. - A certain Jakob Vargoczki, from Przemysl, in Poland ('Jacobus Vargoczki civis Premisliensis', erased sixteenth-century ownership inscription on fol. 23v) - the insertions on thicker vellum in calligraphic Germanic hand and additional prayers and the table of feasts for 21 years from 1572 are probably for him. - Presented on 19 May 1713 to His Highness Carolus Stanislaus Radziwill, Duke of Olyka, by Constantin Brzostowski (1713), bishop of Viln 1687-1713, perpetual custodian of the Cistercian abbey of Mogila (Clara Tumba, founded 1226, diocese of Cracow), with long presentation inscription on the verso of the front flyleaf. Text: fol. 3r: Calendar fol. 15r: the Apostles' Creed and other sixteenth-century additions fol. 24r: the Hours of the Virgin, Use of Rome, with Matins fol. 98r: series of seasonal variants fol. 125r: the Hours of the Cross fol. 196r: the Penitential Psalms and Litany fol. 229r: the Hours of the Cross fol. 279r: the Psalms of Degree fol. 295v: Sixteenth-century additions Illumination: This is a luxurious Florentine Book of Hours probably made around 1470 and then with full-page miniatures inserted perhaps around 1500. The major portion of the book is attributable to Francesco Di Lorenzo Rosselli (1445-1513), illuminator and panel painter in Florence who travelled to Buda to work for Matthias Corvinus in 1480. His style is close to that of Francesco d'Antonio del Chierico (see A. Garzelli, Miniatura Fiorentina del Rinascimento, 1440-1525, II, pls. 500, 512, 531-33, etc.). The pages illustrated by him here are: fol. 24r: historiated initial of the Virgin and Child and vignettes of four bearded prophets, the Holy Dove, and the Nativity of Christ in the stable, with six putti and two coat-of-arms fol. 38r: historiated initial of a young girl fol. 54r: historiated initial of a young girl fol. 60v: historiated initial of a young girl fol. 67r: historiated initial of a young girl fol. 73r: historiated initial of a woman in a bonnet fol. 79r: historiated initial of a young girl fol. 90r: historiated initial of a young girl fol. 125r: historiated initial of a hooded figure in a grey shroud standing in a grave surrounded by skulls; with four vignettes of skulls, either singly, or four together, or in a vase, or on a table being blessed by a bearded monk, with four putti. fol. 196r: historiated initial of David in the wilderness; with two vignettes of David with his psaltery, one of a bearded man, and one of the Holy Dove in flight, with six putti, two with braziers. fol. 229r: historiated initial of Christ as the Man of Sorrow standing in the Tomb; with five vignettes of five apostles and four putti. fol. 279r: historiated initial of the Virgin as a young girl tending a sacred lamp in the Temple; with three vignettes of the Virgin Mary and one of the Holy Dove in flight, with six putti. Sixteenth-century full-page miniatures by different artists in a more formal painterly style, in soft colours with delicate whiskery liquid gold, attributable to Monte del Flora (d. ca. 1528), son of the Sculptor Giovanni di Miniato and brother and partner of the illuminator Gherardo del Flora (d. 1497). The high quality of the painting of these miniatures in fine architectural settings and rocky landscapes are indicative of Monte's style (cf. Garzelli, pl. 993 - compare pl.997 with fol. 195v here; and compare pl.998 with fol. 23v etc.). The full-page miniatures are: fol. 23v: the Annunciation, set in a classical temple, with God appearing above in a blaze of light; the border includes five bearded prophets, the Holy Dove in flight, two putti, two coat-of-arms. fol. 124v: the Raising of Lazarus in a classical building, with St.Mary Magdalene falling on her knees to thank Christ; with five vignettes of skulls, two of hooded figures, and one with a winged skeleton, together with two putti with strings of pearls. fol. 195v: David in the wilderness, his crown on the ground before him, kneeling by a cave (like the image of St. Jerome) with God appearing above and a large crowd of people kneeling in the distance on the right; with eight vignettes of King David at different times of his life (as a child, with the head of Goliath, with his psaltery, as an old man, etc.), and two putti with strings of pearls. fol. 228v: the Crucifixion, with a crowd of saints on the left and Jewish edlers on the right; the border includes a pelican in her piety (representing the shedding of blood for mankind), seven onlookers watching the Crucifixion and two putti. fol. 278v: the Assumption of the Virgin, surrounded by golden cherubim and attended by two angels with large candlesticks, as the apostles gather around her bier on the ground; the border includes four prophets and three putti. Literature: A. Garzelli, Miniatura Fiorentina del Rinascimento, 1440-1525. Un primo censimento, Firenze 1985.

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Printed on vellum.- Hore beate marie virginis secundum usum Parrhisien Totaliter ad longum, Jean Barbier, Paris, 1508.

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Description: Book of Hours, Use of Paris. Hore beate Marie virginis secundum usum Parrhisien, Totaliter ad longum, text in French and Latin, collation: a-o8, 110 ff. (of 112, lacking b5 and e6), printed on vellum, 27 lines, Gothic type, Eustace's large metalcut second device to title, calendar for 1508-1520, full-page metalcut of anatomical man, 14 full-page metalcuts within multiple-piece metalcut borders and 33 smaller cuts within text, initials and line fillers in red or blue and gold, 23 ff. ms. religious texts and prayers in French and Latin in two early ink hands bound in at start and end, genitals of anatomical man neatly removed, occasional staining and finger-soiling, 16th century calf, covers with double gilt filet borders, upper cover with oval medallion of the Crucifixion and lower cover with medallion of the Annunciation (this worn), spine in compartments, each with a small floral tool, spine repaired, rubbed and marked, 8vo (173 x 102mm), [Paris], Guillaume Eustace; [colophon: Jean Barbier for Nicolas Vivien], [9th March, 1508]. ⁂ A rare Hours printed on vellum. This is the only copy we can trace at auction (last sold in the sale of Richard Hatchwell, 2009) and seemingly the only institutional copy is to be found at the State Library of Victoria, Australia. A similar version of this production with the Use of Rome is more common. Jean Barbier is probably the same printer who was first active for a short time in England, working with Julian Notary on the first Sarum missal to be printed in England for Wynkyn de Worde in 1498. Provenance: Richard Hatchwell, his sale Bonhams, 10th June, 2009, lot 6 (loosely inserted bookplate). References: cf. Bohatta 853 and Lacombe 185, similar but with Use of Rome.

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Book of Hours, use of Rome.- Heures a luisage de Rome, printed on vellum with 15 illuminated woodcuts, Paris, Germain Hardouyn, [1516].

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Description: Books of Hours, use of Rome. Heures a luisage de Rome tout au long sans riens requerir nouellement imprimees, printed on vellum with illuminated woodcuts, collation: A-M8, 96ff., Gothic type, text in Latin, title and colophon in French, 15 large hand-painted woodcuts (fols. A1r, B2r, B5r, C7v, D5r, E3r, E4r, E5r, E8r, F3r, F6r, G1r, G5v, I1r, K2v), three-line initials in gold, on grounds of blue and dark pink, numerous one and two-line initials in gold on alternating dark pink and blue ground, rubricated in dark pink and blue, overall an excellent copy, browned and stained in places, quire D slightly loose, some illuminated initials slightly discoloured, handsome early 18th-century French brown morocco à la dentelle, spine with four small raised bands, compartments richly gilt-tooled, marbled endpapers in comb pattern, housed in modern black morocco case, 16mo (107 x 68mm.), Paris, Germain Hardouyin, [1516]. ⁂ An excessively rare early French edition of the Book of Hours, printed on vellum and datable, from the almanach printed at the beginning, to 1516. The volume was issued from the press of the leading Parisian publisher and illuminator Germain Hardouyn, active from c.1500/1505 to 1539/1541. Between the end of the fifteenth century and the early sixteenth century Paris was the principal centre of production and trade for printed Books of Hours, which from a textual point of view followed the manuscript examples. Germain Hardouyn, together with his brother Gilles, printed almost exclusively Books of Hours, producing at least two or three editions per year. For special clients he produced handsome presentation copies of the Heures, printed on vellum and decorated with illuminations, like the copy offered here. It closely resembles an illuminated manuscript: it is printed on vellum in Gothic type, with colophon but no title-page, illustrated with illuminated woodcuts, and decorated with numerous hand-painted initials and line endings. Hardouyn continued to produce illuminated copies of Hours even after other Parisian publishers had abandoned this production. In the present copy the first miniature shows St Cecilia playing a lute, a feature which suggests that this precious copy on vellum was not a standardised one, but rather individually designed. Patrons could in fact request the inclusion of favourite or local saints, and this was particularly the case in books commissioned by distinguished women. Text: The edition includes all standard textual elements of Hours. It opens with the almanach, for the years 1516-1537; the other sections follow: extracts from the Gospels, the Passion according to John, Office of the Virgin, Seven Penitential Psalms, Litanies, Offices of the Dead, supplemented with short offices and Suffrages. Illumination: The text is accompanied by fifteen handsome illuminated woodcuts at the beginning of sections, and mostly depicting scenes from the life of the Virgin Mary, derived in all likelihood from images previously used in other manuscripts or printed Books of Hours. The illumination was probably executed in Hardouyn's workshop. The leaves containing illuminated woodcuts are framed in gold-painted architectonic borders à l'antique, sketched in red on a gold yellow ground, and decorated with Hardouyn's characteristic dangling cords and tassels. The woodcuts are coloured in the new quicker style with the lines of the cut largely obscured by paint, and only in a few areas do the underlying designs show through. fol. A1r: St. Cecilia fol. B2r: John the Evangelist writing fol. B5r: Christ carrying the Cross fol. C7v: Annunciation fol. D5r: Visitation fol. E3r: Christ carrying the Cross (in a different version) fol. E4r: Marriage of the Virgin E5r: Nativity E8r: Annunciation to the Shepherds F3r: Adoration of the Magi F6r: Presentation in the Temple G1r: Flight into Egypt G5v: Coronation of the Virgin I1r: King David K2v: Job on the Dungheap Literature Bohatta 912; J. Guignard, "Livres d'Heures de Germain Hardouyn à la Bibliothèque Nationale", Les trésors des bibliothèques de France, VII (1942), pp. 30-42; K. Lee Bowen, Christopher Plantin's Books of Hours: Illustration and Production, Nieuwkoop 1997, pp. 30-34; V. Reinburg, French Books of Hours. Making an Archive of Prayer, c. 1400-1600, Cambridge 2012. Not recorded in Lacombe

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Book of Hours.-  Horae divine virginis Marie, printed on vellum, Paris, Germain Hardouyin, 1520.

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Description: Books of Hours, use of Rome. Horae diuine virginis Marie secundum usum Romanum...vna cum figuris Apocalipsis & destructio Hierasulem & multis figuris Biblie insertis, printed on vellum, collation: A-M8, 96ff., Gothic type, text in Latin, woodcut printer's device on recto of first leaf, each page of text framed within woodcut border composed of different woodblocks, 20 larger woodcuts (fol. A1v, A6r, A8v, B6r, C5r, D2r, D4r, D6v, D8r, E2r, E5r, F7v, F8r, G7v, G8r, I6v, I7r, K1r, K3r, K8v), including lines of text, smaller vignettes depicting different saints on fols. L5r, L5v, L6r, L7v, L8r, M1r, M1v, M2r, M2v, and M3r, one and two-line initials in gold on alternating dark pink and blue ground throughout, line endings in dark pink, blue and gold, lightly spotted in places, repair to lower margin of fol., E3 slightly touching woodcut border, fine 16th-century brown morocco, over pasteboards, covers decorated with elaborate gilt plaque within border of blind and gilt fillets, at the centre the Virgin with Child, spine with four raised bands underlined bygilt fillets, repaired at extremities, overall an excellent copy, preserved in modern cloth case, title lettered in gilt on spine, 8vo (170 x 106mm.), Paris, Germain Hardouyin, [1520]. ⁂ A rare early French edition of the Book of Hours, printed on vellum and datable from the opening Almanach to 1520. The volume was published by Germain Hardouyn, who was active in Paris from ca. 1500/1505 to 1539/1541, and together with his brother Gilles printed almost exclusively Books of Hours, producing at least two or three editions per year for a distinguished clientele, often printed on vellum or illuminated. His Books of Hours are rightly praised for the the rich illustrative apparatus, depicting mainly scenes from the lives of the Virgin and Christ, and the elaborate borders framing each page of the volume, which show the use of woodblocks derived from the Legenda aurea, and cycles from the Apocalypse and Dance of Death. This copy is in a handsome Renaissance binding, possibly executed in France, decorated with an elaborate plaque similar in style to those used on volumes bound for Jean Grolier, the prince of Bibliophiles. Text: The volume opens as usual with the Almanach (for the years 1520-1532), and the Calendar; the other sections follow: extracts from the Gospels, the Passion according to John, the Hours of the Virgin, the Seven Penitential Psalms, Litanies, Offices of the Dead, supplemented by short offices and Suffrages. Provenance: Arthur John Dorman (ex-libris on the front pastedown) Pamela and Raymond Lister Literature: Bohatta 1045; Lacombe 304, 305; J. Guignard, "Livres d'Heures de Germain Hardouyn à la Bibliothèque Nationale", Les trésors des bibliothèques de France, VII (1942), pp. 30-42; K. Lee Bowen, Christopher Plantin's Books of Hours: Illustration and Production, Nieuwkoop 1997, pp. 30-34; V. Reinburg, French Books of Hours. Making an Archive of Prayer, c. 1400-1600, Cambridge 2012.

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Book of Hours.- Les Presentes Heures a l'usage de Paris, Paris, par la Veufue de feu Thielman Kerver, 19th June, 1525.

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Description: Books of Hours, use of Paris. Les presentes heures a lusage de Paris toutes au long sans rien requetir: nouuesseme[n]t imprimees au dict lieu / auec ques plusieurs belles hystoires, collation: A-R8, aa8, 144ff., Gothic type, text in Latin and French, printed in red and black, large printer's device (two unicorns holding a shield bearing the initials 'T K') on fols. A1r and R8r, 59 full-page metalcut decorative borders surrounding the pages, an excellent copy, with very good impressions of plates, some leaves lightly browned, short tear at the gutter of fol. A4, early 20th-century French olive morocco, covers within blind fillets and floral roll, spine with five raised bands, title and imprint lettered in gilt in second and third compartments, the others decorated with blind floral tool, red morocco doublures, elaborately gold tooled to a rich Grolier pattern and signed by the binder Hardy Mennil and the famous 'doreur' Marius Michel (1846-1925), marbled endpapers in comb pattern, board edges decorated with double gilt fillet, multi-coloured silk bookmark, gilt edges, 4to (218 x143mm.), [colophon on fol. R8v:] Paris / par la Veufue de feu Thielman keruer. Demeurante en la grant rue sainct Iacques / au dessus des Maturins / a lenseigne de la Licorne. M.d.xxv. [colophon on fol. aa8v:] achevé 19 June 1525. ⁂ A remarkable, profusely illustrated Parisian edition of the Book of Hours. The volume was issued on 19 June 1525 from the printing house established by the renowned publisher Thielman Kerver and led, after his death in 1522, by his widow Yolande Bonhomme, who became in turn one of the major Parisian publishers of Books of Hours. Between 1497 and 1522 Kerver, who originated from Coblentz in Germany, published in Paris 124 editions of the Hours for the use of Rome, volumes which are rightly praised for the quality of pictorial narrative, the repertoire of designs and the handsome layout, harmoniously integrating images with the text. The influence of Kerver's Horae can be traced in Italian and Flemish productions, the illustration of which derive directly from Kerver's sets of cuts. The 1525 edition contains the last set produced by Kerver's workshop for Books of Hours. The Parisian printer continuously modified the presentation and illustrations of the book, and it is possible to distinguish changes in style. This set enjoyed a long lifespan and was used by other 16th-century printers. Text: The edition includes all the standard textual elements of a Book of Hours. It opens with the almanach, for the years 1525-1538. The other sections are: Calendar, Gospels, passion according to John, Office of the Virgin, Seven Penitential Psalms, Litanies, Offices of the Dead, supplemented with short officies such as those of the Cross and of the Holy Spirit, Suffrages. The additional final quire contains the Commendationes defunctorum. Illustration: The present set, the last produced by Kerver's workshop, and characterized by thick black outlines and shading, was realised in 1519 after the designs of the famous artist Jean Pichore. The first edition which mentions the 'nouvelles hystoires' was printed by Kerver on 5 December 1519. The Calendar is introduced by the illustration of the Planetary Man, a plate which shows the effects of the planets on different parts of the human body, and appears only occasionally in the manuscript tradition. The months are illustrated not with the seasonal labours or zodiac, but with the cycle of the Ages of Man, from infancy to senility and death, and each image is accompanied by a quatrain in French. All principal sections of the Hours are introduced by a large metalcut: the scenes mainly illustrate the lives of the Virgin and Christ, often derived from the woodblocks used for the famous Biblia Pauperum, the Legenda aurea, the Speculum humanae salvationis, or cycles from the Apocalypse and Dance of Death. Another interesting feature is the elaborate border surrounding each page, showing the influence of both the Italian Renaissance and German printmaking. Several borders are on criblé ground and include pictorial narratives with verse captions explaining the images. The vertical parts of the borders depict biblical scenes, in which the Old Testament is used to aid understanding of the New Testament. The lower parts of the borders combine and re-combine several designs, showing classical elements and secular themes such as scenes of hunting or children playng games, amusing grotesques, putti, seasonal activities, animals and foliage ornaments, portraits of Prophets and Sibylles, and occasionally Kerver's monogram. Provenance: Giraud-Badin Paris, 3-4 May 1937 (Beaux livres anciens, rares et précieux, manuscrits et imprimés; riches reliures armoriées). Henry Burton, Lyon-Genève (ex-libris on recto of front flyleaf). Private collection. Literature: Bohatta 324; Lacombe 347-350; B. Hibbard Beech, "Yolande Bonhomme: A Renaissance Printer", Medieval Prosopography 6 (1985), pp. 79-100; K. Lee Bowen, Christopher Plantin's Books of Hours: Illustration and Production, Nieuwkoop 1997, pp. 37-41; N. Barker, "The Printed Book of Hours", The Book Collector, 53 (2004), pp. 335-352; C. Zöhl, Jean Pichore: Buchmaler, Graphiker und Verleger in Paris um 1500, Turnhout, Brepols, 2004; M. B. Winn - D. Sheerin, "Mixing Manuscript and Print: Franciscan Offices, Venetian Borders, and Kerver's 1510 Hours in Newberry Library Wing MS ZW 5351.1", La Bibliofilia 114 (2012), pp. 161-205.

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Incunabula.- Tortellius (Johannes) Orthographia, Rome, Ulrich Han and Simone Nicola Cardella, [after 10 August], 1471.

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Description: Tortellius (Johannes) Orthographia, collation: [1-210, 3-48, 510, 68, 76, 8-910, 108, 1110, 128, 136, 14-1610, 178, 186, 198, 2010, 218, 22-2710, 288, 2912, 30-3210, 3312], 304ff., fol. 33/11 blank, text in double column, 53 lines, the dedicatory epistle (fol 1/1v) in single column, type: 150G (title), 103R (text), 103Gk (quotations and Greek etymologies of Latin words), fol. 1/2r with 5-line illuminated initial on gold ground with floral extension, lower margin of same leaf with unidentified coat-of-arms, pen-flourished initials alternately in red and blue, overall a good copy, slightly water-stained, a few wormholes in covers and opening leaves, outer upper corners with modern pencil foliation, contemporary half calf over wooden boards, traces of straps, metal clasp preserved on rear board, spine covered with leather in 19th century, folio (391 x 280mm.), Rome, Ulrich Han and Simone Nicola Cardella, [after 10 August] 1471. ⁂ Excedeengly rare first edition of the Orthographia, the monumental Latin dictionary composed between 1449 and 1495 by the humanist Johannes Tortellius (c.1400-1466), who served as a librarian to Pope Nicholas V, to whom the work is dedicated. Tortelli's lexicon is very similar to Lorenzo Valla's Elegantiae, and includes a list of Greek-derived Latin words in the second part. In this edition the printer Ulrich Han made use of a Greek font for the first time, similar to that employed in Rome by Sweynheim and Pannartz. "That of Han, which seems to occur for the first rime in the Tortellius of 1471 [...] has only twenty-three letters, as the o of the roman type is used always" (R. Proctor, The Printing of Greek in the Fifteenth Century, Oxford 1900, p. 29). The Orthographia was edited by the Augustinian Adamo da Montaldo, and the copy-text used for the publication is today preserved in the Vatican Library. The Orthographia had an immediate success and quickly became a reference guide for the study as well as the printing of Greek classics. Literature: HC 15563; GW M47210; BMC IV, 23; IGI 9682; Goff T, 394; L. Capoduro, "L'edizione romana del 'De Orthographia' di G. Tortelli e Adamo de Montaldo", in M. Miglio (ed.), Scrittura, biblioteche e stampa a Roma nel Quattrocento, Città del Vaticano 1983, pp. 37-56.

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Incunabula.- Diomedes. De arte grammatica, Venice, Venice, c.1476-80.

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Description: Diomedes Grammaticus. Ars grammatica [and others grammatical treatises], collation: a10, b-m8, n6, o-t8, u10, x8, 170ff., text in single column, 35 lines, type: 1B:115 (112)R, 115Gk, 5:93GA (the Greek type used only for the signature marks of quires k, n, u, and x), blank spaces for capitals with printed guide letters, fol. a2r with illuminated border of classical motifs, originally painted in red, now oxidised, generally in good conditions, fols. b6 and b7 mounted on a paper strip (possibly supplied from another copy), slight staining and foxing to first and last few leaves, some small repaired wormholes, occasional marginal damp-staining, offprint of British Museum's stamp to lower panel of the opening painted border, early inked foliation, occasional contemporary marginalia, early English 19th-century green morocco, probably by the German binders L. Staggemeier and S. Welcher (active in London from the end of the 18th century), covers blind-tooled with narrow rolls enclosing a wide drawer-handle roll border framing a scrolling palmette roll, 8-pointed star tool in each corner, spine divided into six compartments by false double raised bands and decorated with small floral tools, title lettered in gilt on black morocco label, marbled pastedowns and flyleaves, inner gilt dentelles, gilt edges, folio, 286 x 194mm.,[Venice], Nicolas Jenson, [c.1476-80]. ⁂ First edition of this collection of grammatical and rhetorical writings assembled by Diomedes Grammaticus (half of fourth century) and containing his De arte grammatica, the only Latin grammar of the period to survive complete. With the exception of Donatus all the texts included are printed here for the first time, including: the Institutio de nomine, pronomine et verbo by Priscianus, the De nomine et verbo by Phocas, the Commentarius in artem Donati by Maurus Servius Honoratus, which also includes a portion of Donatus' lost commentary to Virgil. Provenance: British Museum cancelled ink stamp on verso of first and last leaves (sold March 1932); Bernard Quaritch, London; anonymous owner, sale Sotheby's, London, 4 December 1978, lot 60; Ned J. Nackles (1931-1999; sale Christie's New York 17th April 2000, lot 99). Literature: HC 6214; GW 8399; BMC V, 182 (this copy); IGI 3471; Goff D 234; Flodr, Diomedes 1.

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Incunabula.- Horatius Flaccus (Quintus) Opera, Strassburg, Johann Gruninger, 12 March 1498.

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Description: Horatius Flaccus (Quintus) Opera, collation: [*]6, A-Z6, AA-II6, KK-LL8, [**]6, present copy with last quire signed [**], bound between quires [*] and A, 219ff only (of 220, lacking final blank), text in single column, 74 lines (commentary surrounding text and headline), prefatory quire in double column, table in triple column, type: 22:89R (text), 23:64bR (commentary), 19:280G (title), 17:145G (headlines, headings), 4:48G (interlinear glosses), woodcut printer's device on fol. LL7v, 168 woodcut illustrations from 101 blocks by the Terence Master, most printed from composite blocks, many repeated. 2- and 3-line blank spaces for capitals with printed guide letters, generally a good copy, some leaves uniformly browned, a few water-stains, early ink stains and fingermarks, some wormholes, occasionally affecting single letters, old repairs to title, to lower corner of fol. X5 and upper corner of fol. EE4, Latin and German marginalia and emendations throughout in an early German hand, a few bibliographical pencil notes on front pastedown, contemporary German blind-tooled pigskin over bevelled wooden boards, remains of brass clasps, spine with four double raised bands, title on paper label in second compartment, covers stained and rubbed in places, folio (330 x 212mm.), Strassburg, Johann Grüninger, 12 March 1498. ⁂ First illustrated edition of Horace's Opera. Here edited for the first time from a manuscript, in comparison to previous editions published in Italy, which were taken from printed sources. The edition issued by the printer Grüninger is rightly famed for its illustrations and is considered one of the finest illustrated books produced in Germany during the fifteenth century. The text is enhanced by 168 woodcuts, executed by an artist known as the 'Terence Master'. According to Kristeller and von Arnim, only 37 woodblocks were however originally designed and cut for this work. The major part of the illustrations are a re-use of woodblocks employed previously for other editions issued from Grüninger's printing house, such as the famous Narrenschiff by Sebastian Brant, which appeared in 1494-1495, the Terentius of 1496, and the Libro philomusi by Johann Georg Locher of 1497. The opening woodcuts depict Horace as a crowned poet laureate. Provenance: A barely legible early German ownership inscription on the recto of the title ('Paulus Cantag[?]); a small inked monogram combining the letters E and S on the title (with the number '187'); Fernand Heitz (large ex-libris on front pastedown). Literature: HC 8898*; BMC I, 112; Fairfax Murray German 205; Schreiber 4240; Goff H-461.

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Incunabula.- Catherine of Siena (Saint) Epistole devotissime, extremely rare first issue without the italic type in the woodcut, Venice, [Aldus Manutius], September, 1500.

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Description: Catherine of Siena (Saint) Epistole devotissime, collation: *10, a-y8, A-G8, H10, I-N8, O10, P-Z8, AA-FF8, [10], ccccxiiii [i.e. 411], [1] ff., text in single columnn, 40 lines, type: 2:114R, 10:82R, full-page woodcut depicting St. Catherine on fol. *10v, woodcut decorated initials, many on black ground, somewhat water-stained and foxed, first leaf uniformly browned, a few spots and stains, minor wear to the lower outer corner, late 16th-century vellum over pasteboards, spine with three large raised bands, corners worn, rubbed, folio (298 x 202mm.), Venice, [Aldus Manutius], 15-[not after 19] September, 1500. ⁂ An exceptional copy of the famous Aldine edition of 368 letters by Catherine of Siena (1347-1380). The volume was edited for Aldus by Bartolomeo da Alzano, whereas the publishing initiative was commissioned by Margherita, the widow of the rich and learned German merchant Peter Ugelheimer, the former business partner of Nicolas Jenson. The text of the Epistolae is introduced by a woodcut frontispiece showing the famous image of the Saint holding an open book in her right hand, in which five words are printed (in the majority of recorded copies), which represent the first appearance of the celebrated Aldine italic type, designed and cut for Aldus Manutius by the Bolognese punchcutter and typefounder Francesco Griffo. In the present copy the book held by the Saint is without the words in italics, thereby testifying to an earlier state of the Aldine publication. It is one of very few copies, perhaps only a handful, of the Epistolae in this first issue. The woodcut depicting Saint Catherine was in all likelihood executed by the Paduan illuminator and designer Benedetto Bordon, who was also responsible for the illustrative apparatus of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili (1499), the masterpiece of Venetian book illustration. Many details link this woodcut to Bordon: the composition and the balanced blank spaces, the shaded style in the design of the mantle, the figure type, and the resemblance of Catherine's features with that of the Virgin designed by Bordon for the initial 'S' in the Introit for the Pentecost in the Giunta Graduale romanum of 1499-1500. Provenance: Ownership inscriptions 'Di Gian Batta Giacobini' and 'ossia di Suor Caterina Angela Cappuccina' on recto of the first leaf; ownership inscription 'Giovanni Giacobini', dated April 1872 on fol. a1r. Earlier ownership inscription 'Questo Libro e di me Carlo Venuti' on recto of final leaf. Literature: HCR 4688; GW 6222 ; BMC V 562; Goff C281; IGI 2587; Renouard 23.2; Ahmanson-Murphy 36; Sander 1821; Essling 1230; M. Laurent, "Alde Manuce l'Ancien, éditeur de S. Catherine de Siene", Traditio, v (1947), pp. 357-363; L. Armstrong, "Benedetto Bordon, Miniator, and Cartography in Early Sixteenth-Century Venice", Imago Mundi 48 (1996), pp. 65-92; E. Sandal, "Nota di bibliografia cateriniana. A margine dell'edizione aldina delle Epistole", in D. Casagrande - A. Scarsella, Verso il Polifilo 1499-1999, Venezia 1998, pp. 171-183.

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Pulci (Luigi) S'ensuit l'histoire de Morgant le Geant..., Paris, Alain Lotrian, 1536.

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Description: Pulci (Luigi) S'ensuit l'histoire de Morgant le geant lequel avec les freres persecutoient tousiours les Chrestiens et serviteurs de Dieu..., collation: ā4, a-z4, cum4, rum4, A-O4, 160ff., Gothic type, text in two columns, title in red and black with a three-quarter page woodcut depicting a tournament and a large decorated criblé initial, 14 woodcuts in text of different sizes and shapes, that on verso of title full-page, decorated woodcut initials throughout, a fine, unsophisticated copy, some leaves lightly browned, pale water-stain to lower margin of last quires, a few paper flaws, fols. N4 and O1 slightly loose and early reinforced with parchment strip, contemporary vellum wallet binding, tie preserved, inked title to upper cover in an early hand, some stains to covers, a few bibliographical pencil notes on front pastedown, early shelf-marks on verso of front flyleaf, 4to (184 x 131mm.), Paris, Alain Lotrian, [c.1536]. ⁂ Rare edition of the French translation of the Morgante, which is a narrative account of the adventures of Orlando and the giant Morgante. Pulci's chivalric and simultaneously 'carnevalesque' poem, composed in its final version of 28 cantos in octava rima, was first published in Italian in 1478 in 23 cantos. Pulci returned to his poem, and the last five cantos appeared in 1483, including the narrative of the 'Rotta di Roncisvalle'. The work met with great success and, owing to its popularity, was translated into French prose in 1517 and then published in Paris in 1519. The present edition (dated to about 1536) is illustrated with woodcuts in a popular style to complement the narrative and depict knights, tournaments, battles, and sieges. Provenance: 'Ce presendte libre appartin a moy Jhan Jaques demourant a annery 1548. [?] Julliett' (French ownership inscription on rear pastedown); small ink stamp 'bibliotheca' on verso of title. Literature: Brunet III, 170.

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New Testament, Greek.-  Tes Kaines Diathekes Apanta, Novum Testamentum, Robert Estienne, Paris, 1546.  The first Estienne Greek New Testament.

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Description: New Testament, Greek. Tes Kaines Diathekes Apanta. Novum Testamentum [graece], edited by Robert Estienne, collation: a-z, A-K; aa-zz8, 2 parts in 1, first Estienne edition, second issue (with November in colophon), titles Greek and Roman type, text Greek type, titles with woodcut basilisk devices, woodcut decorative initials and head-pieces, colophon f. with woodcut printer's device verso, final 2 ff. blank (2z7&8), contemporary ink marginalia and inter-linear notes in different hands, staining at head of first c.40pp. to varying degrees, some (mostly light) foxing or spotting, contemporary blind-stamped and later gilt armorial vellum over boards with 'I § A §' and date '1548' to upper cover, spine in compartments and with contemporary ink title and shelf number '60', soiled, 16mo (133 x 90mm), Paris, Robert Estienne, November, 1546. ⁂ The first Estienne Greek New Testament. It is the first book printed in Claude Garamond's second and smallest grecs du roi. Estienne established his text by comparing the Complutensian and Erasmian printed editions with several manuscripts. 'The first Estienne Greek Testament and the second of 1549...are commonly known as the "O mirificam" editions, from the opening words of Robert's preface to François I, praising him for commissioning the second Greek font in order to provide Greek texts in pocket format' (Schreiber). Provenance: '1559, S E T, Joachim a Sÿntzendorff' (ink inscription to head of first title), the marginalia appears to be in the same hand; contemporary ink notes to penultimate blank headed 'Durandus De Coena'. Literature: Adams B1657; D&M 4616; Mortimer, French, 74; Renouard, Estienne, 66:2; Schreiber 90.

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English Binding.- Clenardus (Nicolaus) Institutiones ac meditationes in Graecam linguam, Frankfurt, Heirs of Andreas Wechel, 1590-91.

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Description: English Binding.- Clenardus (Nicolaus) Institutiones ac meditationes in Graecam linguam... cum Scholiis & Praxi P. Antesignani Rapistaniensis, 3 parts in 1 vol., [124], 414, [10], 415-574 (numbered as columns), [32]pp., collation: a-p4, q2, A-Z4, a-z4, Aa-Gg4, Gg-Ss4, (in part 3 seventh and eighth quires are both signed Gg), three separate titles, each with woodcut printer's device, woodcut decorated initials and headpieces, some leaves uncut, single wormhole to I1-N4, affecting some letters of text, splendid contemporary English binding by Vincent Williamson for Eton College of dark brown calf over pasteboards, covers within borders of gilt and blind fillets and decorated with acorn tools and rosettes, cornerpieces and at the centre of both covers a large plaque inspired by Estienne's device with the motto 'noli altum sapere', traces of green silk ties, smooth spine, divided into compartments by double gilt fillets, edges speckled red, light wear to extremities, joints rubbed and cracking, front hinge split, a few wormholes, preserved in modern red cloth case, title lettered in gilt on black morocco spine label, 4to (256 x 171mm.), Frankfurt am Main, Heirs of Andreas Wechel, Claude Marne and Johann Aubry, 1590-1591. ⁂ The augmented edition of the popular Greek grammar by the Flemish theologian and philogian Nicolas Clenardus or Nicolas Cleynaerts (1495-1542), which first appeared in 1580, and is offered here in a handsome binding executed in the workshop of Vincent Williamson - one of the few recorded bearing the famous device of Eton with the motto 'Noli altum sapere' (Ep. Rom., 11: 20). For a similar binding see Bearman-Krivatsy-Mowery, Fine and Historic Bindings from the Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington 1992, II, 4. Provenance: William Henry Corfield (1843-1903; sale Sotheby Wilkinson & Hodge 1904); Charles William Dyson Perrins (1864-1958; Sotheby's 1947); William Foyle (1885-1963; sale Christie's 2000). Literature: Adams C2157; VD C, 4156; STC German, 213; L. Bakelants-R. Hoven, Bibliographie des oeuvres de Nicolas Clenard. 1529-1700, Verviens 1981, no. 298.

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Incunabula.- Boethius (Anicius Manilus Torquatus) de Consolatione philosophica et de disciplina scolarium, 1498.

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Description: Boethius (Anicius Manilus Torquatus Severinus) de consolatione philosophica et de disciplina scolarium, edited by Conradus Poseiaen, collation: a-m8 n6, table triple column, text and commentary double column, 101 ff. (of 102, lacking final blank), 66 lines of commentary surrounding text and headline, Gothic type, woodcut historiated initials, f4 bound before f1, water-stained, some marginal worming, marginal repairs, later vellum, spotted, folio (314 x 210mm.), [Venice], [Bonetus Locatellus, for Octavianus Scotus], [14 June, 1498]. ⁂ The second work is pseudo-Boethius and the commentary pseudo-Thomas Aquinas. Provenance; 'E libris Josephi H. Lupton' (ink signature to front free endpaper); E.C. Simpson (modern bookplate to front pastedown). Literature: BMC V, 450; Goff B-804; HC 3407; Proctor 5089; GWK 4565.

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Aldus Manutius.-  Anthologia Graeca, Venice, Aldus Manutius, November, 1503.

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Description: Anthologia Graeca. Florilegium diversorum epigrammatum in septem libros. Ἀνθολογία διαφόρων ἐπιγραμμάτων...,, collation: A-Z8, AA-MM8, NN10, 290ff., Greek and Roman type, Aldine anchor device on title and verso of final leaf, blank spaces for capitals, with printed guided letters, overall a good copy, old repairs to inner and upper margins of first leaf and to inner margin of second leaf, lightly foxed, pale water-stain to outer margin of first and final quire, wormhole in blank margin of fol. A3, without any loss of text, contemporary Greek and Latin annotations, especially in the first quires, the same hand has numbered the first 54 leaves, fol. NN10v an unknown owner has copied the Italian translation of an epigram ascribed to Plato, included in the third book of the Greek Anthology, on fol. NN6r a curious manuscript recipe for making glue from the fruit of the quince tree, overall a good copy in a fine Venetian contemporary brown leather over wooden boards, covers framed within three borders of fillets, knotworks and roundels, knotwork motifs at the centre, spine with three raised bands, compartments blind-tooled with roundels and cross-fillets, traces of clasps, original pastedowns (probably from a vellum manuscript) removed, leather turn-ins visible on inside of boards, rear cover becoming detached, spine scuffed at extremities, minor wear to corners, a few wormholes, 8vo (166 x 102 mm), Venice, Aldus Manutius, November, 1503. ⁂ First Aldine edition and second overall of the Anthologia Graeca, in a handsome Venetian binding. For his collection Aldus adopted the new title Florilegium diversorum epigrammatum and the volume was issued in the easily portable octavo size, the revolutionary series of Aldine classical texts with the inaugural Greek book being the Sophocles of 1502. From a textual point of view the edition largely follows the Florentine editio princeps of 1494 edited by Ianos Laskaris; however it includes numerous variants, 19 additional epigrams, the first edition of the 6th-century Byzantine In Thermas Pythicas et aquarum miracula by Paulos Silentiarios, and a final Greek letter by Scipio Forteguerri in praise of Aldus. The text is printed in the smallest and finest Aldine Greek type, modelled on Aldus's own hand and designed and cut by the Bolognese punchcutter and typefounder Francesco Griffo. "This final achievement of Francesco Griffo fully deserves the praise accorded to it by Mardersteig. It is true that our eyes turn to it with grateful welcome, unaccustomed as they are to the ligatures and abbreviations of the earlier types. But by any standards it is a masterpiece, not only of engraving skill executed with marvellous homogeneity on a minute scale, but also of exquisitely planned letter fit" (N. Barker, Aldus Manutius and the Development of Greek Script and Type in the Fifteenth Century, New York 1992, p. 89). Literature: Adams A1181; STC Italian 313; Renouard Alde, 42,9; Ahmanson-Murphy 79; Marciana 87-88; Laurenziana 81; J. Hutton, The Greek Anthology in Italy, Ithaca 1935, pp. 39-40, 148-149, 151-154.

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Reisch (Gregorius) Aepitoma Omnis Phylosophiae Alias Margarita Phylosophica Tractans, 1504.

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Description: Reisch (Gregorius) Aepitoma Omnis Phylosophiae Alias Margarita Phylosophica Tractans, collation: B-C6 D-E8 F28 G8 H6 I8 K4 L-N8 O6 P-Q8 R6 S-V8 X6 Y-Z8, a8 b4 c6 d-e8 f6 g-h8 i4 k-l8 m6 n-p8, Roman, Gothic, Hebrew and Greek types, large woodcut to title, numerous woodcut illustrations (some full-page), diagrams and music, 2 tables on 1 folding sheet between P2&3, a few instances of early colouring in red, front pastedown and endpaper with early ink notes, lacking F28 and P7, some staining and spotting, lightly browned, contemporary pigskin over wooden boards, remains of metal clasps, rebacked, preserving original backstrip, soiled, 4to (212 x 150mm.), [Strasbourg], [Johann Gruninger], [1504]. ⁂ The rare second unauthorised edition of this splendidly illustrated compendium of the medieval trivium and quadrivium and moral and natural philosophy. It includes a Hebrew grammar by the German theologian and humanist Konrad Pellikan, as well as sections on music, astronomy, astrology, geological and geographical matters and mathematics, amongst others. References: This edition not in Adams; Sabin 69123; European Americana 504/2.

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Turks.- Andronicus (Tranquillus Parthenius) Hec Co[n]tinent[ur] in hoc Opusculo...Ad Deum Contra Thurcas Oratio Carmina Heroico, 1515.

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Description: Turks.- Andronicus (Tranquillus Parthenius) Hec Co[n]tinent[ur] in hoc Opusculo...Ad Deum Contra Thurcas Oratio Carmina Heroico, collation: A-B4, Gothic and Roman types, title with large attractive woodcut depicting mounted Turks charging towards a Christian King, woodcut decorative initial, 2 pairs of small wormholes, one pair marginal, the other within text with minor loss, 19th century mottled boards, upper cover detached along with backstrip, 4to (199 x 148mm.), [Nuremberg], [Johann Stuchs], [c.1515]. ⁂ A rare collection of Latin poems on the Turkish threat overshadowing Europe by this Dalmatian humanist. Franjo Trankvil Andreis was a professor at Leipzig, diplomat, orator and correspondent of Erasmus. Literature: Not in Adams; VD16 online A2807; Göllner 103.

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Aristides. Orationes, [Florence], [Philip Giunto], 1517.

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Description: Aristeides (Publius Aelius) Λόγοι Ἀριστείδου. Orationes, collation: a-z8, 183, [1]ff., Greek, roman and gothic type, large Giunta device on verso of final leaf, initial spaces with guide-letters,single wormhole in upper blank margin of last few leaves, Macclesfield copy with book-plate of the North Library (dated 1860) on front pastedown and blindstamp on first and two final leaves, late 17th-century gilt-tooled red morocco, covers framed by double fillet and dog's tooth wreath, floral tool at corners, spine with five raised bands, gilt title on brown morocco lettering-piece in second compartment, the remainder decorated with small floral and à berceau tools, marbled pastedowns and endpapers, gilt board-edges, gilt edges, corners and joints lightly rubbed, head of spine torn, folio (280 x 179mm.), Florence, Filippo Giunta, 20 May 1517. ⁂ Editio princeps of Aristides's orations. Born in Hadrianopolis, Aristides was one of the most prominent orators of the Second Sophistic. The fifty-three Λόγοι include the famous Ἱεροὶ λόγοι (Sacred Tales) in which Aristides reports his religious experiences in the temple of Asclepius at Pergamum, offering an important account of the Greek ritual of 'incubation' - the practice of intentional sleeping in the Asclepeion's temple and praying for a divine dream, seeing the healing god in a dream, waking up and walking out, healed. The text was edited by the philologist Eufrosino Bonini, former pupil of Angelo Poliziano, probably on the basis of a codex bought in Greece by Francesco Filelfo, and presently in the Biblioteca Laurenziana (Laur.gr. 60,8). Literature: Adams A1702; STC Italian, 42; Camerini Firenze, 101; Renouard Alde, xli.95; Pettas, Giunti, 206; Haskell Norman, 68; Hoffmann i, pp. 246-247; C.A. Behr, Aelius Aristides and the Sacred Tales, Amsterdam 1968; Id., Studies on the Biography of Aelius Aristides in Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt, 2.34.2, Berlin 1994, pp. 1140-1233; J. Walker, Rhetoric and Poetics in Antiquity, New York-Oxford 2000, pp. 111-113; L. Quattrocelli, Ricerche sulla tradizione manoscritta di Elio Aristide: per una nuova datazione del Laur. 60, 8, "Scriptorium", 60 (2006), pp. 206-226; Ead., Aelius Aristides' Reception at Byzanthium, in Aelius Aristides between Greece, Rome, and the Gods, ed. W.V. Harris-B. Holmes, Leiden 2008, pp. 279-293.

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Drink.- Hegendorf (Christoph), Encomium Sobrietatis, 1520.

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Description: Drink.- Hegendorf (Christoph) Encomium Sobrietatis, collation: A-B4, Roman and a few instances of Gothic type, title within charming woodcut border depicting monkeys and putti clambering over fruiting vines, woodcut initials, modern boards covered with a rubricated early printed leaf, small 4to (190 x 138mm), [Leipzig], [Valentin Schumann], [?c.1520]. ??? Scarce early satire praising sobriety, which includes numerous quotations from classical authors. The author was a theological scholar, expert on the law and great admirer of Erasmus. Literature: Not in Adams; VD 16 H1183 listing one edition, possibly the present, ascribing it to Valentin Schumann and dating it to 1519.

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Block book.- Vavassore (Giovanni Andrea) Opera nova contemplativa, Venice, 1530.

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Description: Biblia Pauperum.- Opera nova contemplativa per ogni fidel christiano, laquale tratta de le figure del Testamento vecchio, lequale figure sonno verificate nel Testamento nuovo, con le sue expositione et con el detto de li propheti sopra esse figure..., collation: A-H8 (fol. G4 signed C4; lacking H1, H7, and the last blank leaf H8), 61ff. only (of 64), entirely printed using woodblocks, title surrounded by a white-on-black strap-work border, 118 large woodcuts accompanied by captions, floral side-strips, lower panel depicting prophets or other features from the scriptures, some leaves browned, occasional spotting, minor stains, bibliographical pencil notes on recto of front flyleaf, modern vellum, smooth spine, divided in compartments by narrow gilt friezes, title lettered in gilt on green morocco spine label, 8vo (155 x 102mm.), [Colophon:] Venice, Giovanni Andrea Vavassore, [after 1511]. ⁂ The rare first issue of the first edition of the only Biblia pauperum printed in Italy and in the Italian vernacular, generally considered as the latest example of a blockbook, and also by Essling as the only Italian blockbook. The template is represented by the forty-leaf Netherlandish editions of the Biblia pauperum, but the Venetian printer Vavassore takes iconographic inspiration from Bellini, Carpaccio, Mantegna and Squarcione as well as Dürer, and alters the traditional arrangement (three sections of 40 blocks) in a continuous series of 120 blocks. Each page-spread, effectively a diptych, shows a New Testament scene on one side, with a lower section of prophets and versicles, and a conceptually and theologically parallel scene from the Old Testament on the other, with a brief account of the action and a moral lesson. The date of publication is not known, but one of the blocks used ('Jesus drives the traders from the temple') is a modified version of a scene appearing in Albrecht Dürer's Small Passion, published in 1511. Schreiber gives the variants of three issues after this. Although the fol. H7 depicting (one the verso) the Virgin and Child enthroned is lacking (as in seemingly many copies), the present copy corresponds indeed to the first issue owing to the fact that the text is printed entirely in gothic type, including the fols. E5 and H5 which in the other issues are set in roman. Furthermore, the order of the cuts in the first quire of this copy corresponds to that given by Schreiber, with the Queen of Sheba on fol. A3v and Moses and the burning bush on fol. A6r, whereas Essling reverses the order of these two cuts. Literature: Adams V229; Essling, 206; Mortimer Italian 518; Dyson Perrins-Pollard, 251; Sander 1006; Schreiber, Manuel de l'amateur de la gravure, IV, pp. 105-113.

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Law.- Straccha (Benvenuto) Tractatus de Mercatura, seu Mercatore Omnia,, 1556.

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Description: Law.- Straccha (Benvenuto) Tractatus de Mercatura, seu Mercatore Omnia, collation: a-z A-R8 S4, 2 parts in 1, double column, Roman and italic type, titles with woodcut printer's device, woodcut historiated and decorative initials, a few instances of early ink marginalia and underlining, occasional spotting, lightly browned, medieval manuscript used in binding, contemporary limp vellum, yapp edges, lacking ties, spotted, 8vo (169 x 110mm), Lyon, Sebastian de Honoratis, 1556. ⁂ The first edition of the reunion of these two works. It includes Stracca's works on commercial law and Pedro de Santarem's important work on insurance, which is considered by Kress to be 'the first modern treatise on insurance'. Provenance: P.Guiraudi (large bookplate to front pastedown, with item number 3208). Literature: Baudier IV 171; Kress S156; not in Einaudi.

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Duel.- Mérode (Richard de) La Justification du Seigneur Richard de Merode Seigneur de Frentzen, touchant sa querelle avecq le Seigneur Don Roderigue de Benavides, 1560.

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Description: Duel.- Mérode (Richard de) La Justification du Seigneur Richard de Merode Seigneur de Frentzen, touchant sa querelle avecq le Seigneur Don Roderigue de Benavides, collation: A-Q4, Roman type, title with very small woodcut ornament, 2 full-page woodcuts depicting Benavides wearing his full regalia, folding woodcut plate of the offending breastplate, some spotting or light foxing, occasional light staining, lightly browned, 19th century blind-stamped calf over wooden boards in an Gothic style, joints starting, but holding firm, rubbed and scuffed, 4to (191 x 131mm), Mantua, ?Venturino Ruffinelli, 1560. ⁂ The extremely rare first edition in French of Merode's Giustificazione, which outlines the history and arguments surrounding a duel, which in fact never took place and for which both parties claimed victory. The quarrel began when Benavides having accepted the challenge was nominator of weapons and proposed that he wear a breastplate. Mérode strongly objected to this, as it would offer his opponent greater protection. The arguments on the day of the duel lasted over an hour and ended with Mérode declaring Benavides a coward and himself victor. The present work continues the arguments and justifications for Mérode's position, with the woodcuts depicting Benavides's disputed armour. Literature: Not in Adams or EDIT 16.

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Fête.- Ferrara.- Argenti (Agostino) Cavalerie della Citta di Ferrara, 1566.

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Description: Fête.- Ferrara.- [Argenti (Agostino)] Cavalerie della Citta di Ferrara. Che contengo il castello di Gorgoferusa. Il Monte di Feronia. Et Il Tempio d'Amore., collation: [*]2 A-O4, ✠4 A-Z, ✠, ✠✠4, 2 parts in 1, Roman type, woodcut historiated initials and head-pieces, some staining, heavier to preliminaries, occasional spotting, 18th century calf-backed vellum boards, rebacked, preserving original wormed backstrip, rubbed, 4to (225 x 156mm.), [Ferrara], [Francesco Rossi], [second title dated 1566]. ⁂ First edition of this account of the Tempio d'Amore, which was an elaborate spectacle performed at the court of Ferrara on 11th December as part of the wedding celebrations of Duke Alfonso d'Este and Princess Barbara of Austria. It includes much on the participants, the staging and the libretti. Ferrara was known as something of a centre for this type of entertainment, which used spectacular scenery, elaborate machinery and 'special effects', and incorporated singing and dancing in performances. Literature: Adams F265; Cicognara 1376; Ruggieri 714; EDIT 16 CNCE 10442.

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New World.- Mainoldus, Galeratus (Jacobus) De Titulis Philippi Austrii Regis Catholici Liber, 1573.

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Description: Mainoldus (Jacobus), Galeratus. De Titulis Philippi Austrii Regis Catholici Liber, collation: A-Z4, AA-HH4, italic type, title with woodcut printer's device, numerous woodcut arms within text, woodcut historiated or decorative initials, final f. with errata and register, some light spotting and staining, contemporary limp vellum, head of spine nicked, soiled, 4to (199 x134mm.), Bologna, Peregrino Bonardo, 1573. ⁂ Rare first edition of a collection of histories of the territories held by Philip II of Spain. It includes a 22 page chronology of the New World, with descriptions of Columbus's voyages and an account of events up to the 1540s. Literature: Not in Adams or Sabin; European Americana 573/30; Palau 147458; EDIT 16 CNCE 26061.

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Supernatural.- Boaistuau (Pierre) Histoires Prodigieuses extraictes du plusieurs fameux autheurs, 1580.

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Description: Supernatural.- Boaistuau (Pierre) and others. Histoires Prodigieuses extraictes du plusieurs fameux autheurs, collation: A-Z8 AA-BB8 CC4, A-H8, Aa-Zz8 AAa4, A-E8 F4, A-K8, 5 parts in 1, first complete edition, titles with woodcut printer's devices, part 2 last 2 ff. blank, part 4 penultimate f. with woodcut printer's device otherwise blank and with final blank, 105 woodcuts within text, woodcut decorative initials and tail-pieces, water-stained, occasional spotting, 20th century burgundy crushed morocco, gilt, spine in compartments, spine faded, rubbed, g.e., large 12mo (120 x 75mm.), Paris, Hieronymus de Marnef & the widow of Gulielmus Cavellat, 1580-1582. ⁂ The rare first complete edition of this work on demons, sea-monsters, serpents, monstrous births, comets, earthquakes and floods, amongst other unnatural and natural phenomena, with many of the bizarre creatures brought to life in the woodcuts. Only the first part is by Boaistuau, with part 2 by Claude de Tisserant parts 3 and 5 by François de Belleforest and part 4 (dated 1580) by R. Hoyer. Literature: Not in Adams; Caillet II, 5186bis.

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First children's encyclopedia.- Freigius (Johannes Thomas) Hoc est libellus ostendens qua ratione prima artium initia pueris quam facillime tradi possint, 1582.

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Description: First children's encyclopedia.- Freigius (Johannes Thomas) Hoc est libellus ostendens qua ratione prima artium initia pueris quam facillime tradi possint, collation: α8 a-z8, Roman, italic, Greek and Hebrew types, title with large woodcut printer's device, folding table, woodcut illustrations and music, final f. colophon recto and woodcut printer's device verso, printing flaw to p.161 with loss of text, a few small marginal worm traces towards end, occasional spotting, a few small stains, 20th century vellum-backed boards, 8vo (162 x 93mm), Basel, Sebastian Henricpetri, 1582. ⁂ Rare first edition of the first children's encyclopedia, which was praised by Voltaire and rarely appears at auction. Freig was a pupil and the first biographer of the great educational reformer Pierre de la Ramée (Ramus), and later became Rector of the renowned school as Altdorf. The work includes Latin, Greek and Hebrew grammars, and sections on French conversation, rhetoric, music, coinage, architecture, physics, economics, law and medicine, each expounded in the form of question and answer. Literature: VD 16 F2581; Buisson p.297; Thorndike VI, 352; Ong 652.

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Fanfare binding.- Cicero (Marcus Tullius) Les Sentences Ilustres, 1589.

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Description: Fanfare binding.- Cicero (Marcus Tullius) Les Sentences Illustres, collation: A-Z Aa-Zz AAa-Lll8, Roman and italic letter, text in Latin and French, small woodcut ornament to title, woodcut portrait of Cicero to recto of otherwise blank final f., sig.Fff bound before sig. Eee, paper flaw to head of Bbb5, some water-staining, lightly browned, occasional spotting, contemporary burgundy morocco gilt à la fanfare, covers with central oval cartouche containing name of owner of the volume, these surrounded by a rich array of floral and foliage tools, all enclosed within two sets of filet borders, spine similarly richly decorated and within double filet borders, sympathetically rebacked, preserving original backstrip, corners sympathetically restored, backstrip with some creasing, rubbed, g.e., 16mo (119 x 75mm.), Lyon, Antoine de Harsy, 1589. ⁂ A handsome binding, It is rare to find a fanfare binding with the name and details of the person who commissioned the binding, along with a date of execution, rather than simply central arms. This binding was executed for Jean IV Daffis, Bishop of Lombez. A number of the tools are reminiscent of Clovis Ève (for a similar composition see the Ezmerian sale catalogue vol.1 lot 33, 1972). Provenance; Jean IV Daffis, Bishop of Lombez from 1598-1614. Upper cover of binding with 'DE DIT. R. D. I. DAFFIS EPI. LUMBARIENSIS' and lower cover with 'IN COLLE. SOC. IESU TOLOS. AN. DO. 1601'.

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Fête.- Riccardi (Riccardo Romolo), Rime Cantate nel Giardino...Con l'occasione d'una festa fatta quivi per la Reina, 1600.

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Description: Fête.- Florence.- Riccardi (Riccardo Romolo) Rime Cantate nel Giardino...Con l'occasione d'una festa fatta quivi per la Reina, first and ?only edition, collation: A12, italic type, small woodcut ornament to title, woodcut historiated initials, some spotting, narrow area of water-staining to outer margin of last 2 ff., modern red morocco, gilt, spine slightly faded, rubbed, 4to, Florence, Domenico Manzani, 1600. ⁂ Rare first and probably only edition, with EDIT 16 listing only four copies. This entertainment with a charming garden setting at the Palazzo di Valfonda in Florence was organised by the banker, collector and poet Riccardi, who later went on to establish the great Biblioteca Riccardiana. The occasion interspersed music and dancing with jousting and chariot racing and concluded with a hunt. It was attended by a number of important visitors who had come to Florence to celebrate the departure of Marie de' Medici for her marriage to Henri IV of France. Literature: Not in Adams; EDIT 16 CNCE 62236; Moreni II, 246 ('rarissime'); cf. Piero Marchi 'La scena del principe' in Firenze e la Toscana dei medici nell'Europa del Cinquecento, 1980.

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Numismatics.- Placcaet Ende Ordonnantie van de E.Heeren Staten van Hollant ende West-Wrieslant..., Aelbrecht Heyndricksz, The Hague, 1603 bound with 2 others, similar, and a 1752 Dutch broadside on coins (2)

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Description: Numismatics.- Placcaet Ende Ordonnantie van de E.Heeren Staten van Hollant ende West-Wrieslant..., 1603 bound with Beeldenaer, ofte Figuer-boeck dienende op de nieuwe Ordonnantie vander Munte...,1604 and Manvael, ofte Handt-boeck Inhoudende die weerde vanden Marck..., 1603, together 3 vol. in 1, titles with woodcut device, the second two with numerous woodcuts of coins, the last with some printed slips pasted over existing captions (one or two loosely inserted), old ink inscription on front free endpaper, contemporary vellum, traces of silk ties, a little soiled and worn, spine defective, 4to, The Hague, Aelbrecht Heyndricksz § Placaat de Staaten Generaal der vereenigde Nederlanden. Figure en afbeeldinge van de Schellingen, op de Nederlandsche Munte geslaagen..., broadside, woodcuts of coins, a little soiled and browned, creases from folds, slightly frayed at edges with loss of a few letters, c.520 x 375mm., The Hague, Jacob Schelt, 1752 (2)

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Mythology.- Conti (Natale) Mythologiae sive explicationis Fabularum libri decem, 1616.

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Description: Mythology.- Conti (Natale) Mythologiae sive Explicationis Fabularum libri decem, first illustrated edition, double column, title in red and black and with large woodcut arms, folding woodcut plate of the heavens, 2 full-page and over 100 half-page woodcut illustrations within text, small section of corner of folding plate torn away with minor loss to part of border, title spotted and stained, elsewhere occasional light water-staining and some spotting, 19th century calf-backed mottled boards, spine gilt, rubbed and marked, 4to, Padua, House of Petrus Paulus Tozzi & Laurent Pasquati, 1616. ⁂ The most influential mythography of the late Renaissance. In France it was used as a source book by Ronsard and other members of the Pléiade and in England by George Chapman and Francis Bacon. Some of the woodcuts in this work are found in the excellent edition of Cartari's Imagini, which was a collaboration between the antiquarian Lorenzo Pignoria and the Paduan printer Pierpaolo Tozzi. Jean Seznec in his Survival of the Pagan Gods, 1953 discusses the great influence of this work.

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