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Auction Description for Deutscher and Hackett: Aboriginal Art from the Luczo Family Collection, USA

Aboriginal Art from the Luczo Family Collection, USA (97 Lots)

by Deutscher and Hackett


97 lots with images

19 October 2016

Live Auction

South Yarra, Australia

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JAN BILLYCAN (DJAN NAMUNDIE), (c.1930 – 2016), KIRRIWIRRI, 2006 – 2007 , suite of five works, synthetic polymer paint and natural earth pigments on plywood panels

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Description: JAN BILLYCAN (DJAN NAMUNDIE), (c.1930 – 2016), KIRRIWIRRI, 2006 – 2007 , suite of five works, synthetic polymer paint and natural earth pigments on plywood panelsSIGNED: each bears inscription verso: artist’s name, date, medium, number and Short Street Gallery cat. 24211DIMENSIONS: 90.5 x 60.0 cm each PROVENANCE: Short Street Gallery, BroomeAP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USARELATED WORK:All the Jila, 2006, in the collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, illus. in Croft, B., Culture Warriors: Australian Indigenous Art Triennial, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2007, p. 68ESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Short Street Gallery that states: ‘“This place is the birth-place of my father’s clan. Our clan is also Kirriwirri and call each individual members of the clan Kirriwirri. There is a big warla (mud flat) at this place. This is what this painting is about.” Kirriwirri is in the Great Sandy Desert close to the Canning Stock Route in Western Australia. It is the birthplace of Jan and her family. This work shows tali (sand dunes) and ila (living water).’The paintings of Jan Billycan (DjanNamundie) exhibit the Aboriginal perception that draws a metaphysical analogy between the human body and the landscape. The land is not separate from the people who inhabit it; rather, it is a fundamental element of an individual’s identity on ancestral, physical and social levels. Kirriwirri, 2006– 2007, is an outstanding pictorial expression of the concept where ribcage-like sections correspond to rows of tali or sand hills in Billycan’s ancestral lands, bulbous blue forms represent jila or ‘living water’ (freshwater) and the so-called ‘intestines’ map the journeys of the creator beings through the landscape. The artist’s statement that accompanies the painting describes Kirriwirri as not only the birthplace of her father’s clan, but the name of that clan and a name for each individual member of the clan. The painting possesses a visceral quality that is evident throughout the artist’s mature work; forms jostle against one another and push up against the picture frame. Kirriwirri, 2006– 2007 is one a small number of multi-panelled works made by the artist – the largest of which is All That Jila, 2006, housed in the collection of the National Gallery of Australia and featured in Culture Warriors, the first National Indigenous Triennial at the Gallery in 2007.1 Jan Billycan has been represented in other major exhibitions including YiwarraKuju: The Canning Stock Route at the National Museum of Australia, Canberra (2010), and in 2011 she won the Western Australian Artist of the year award at Art Gallery of Western Australia.WALLY CARUANA1. Croft, B.L., Culture Warriors: National Indigenous Triennial, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2007, p. 68 (illus.)

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DANIEL WALBIDI, born 1983, ALL THE JILA, 2007, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: DANIEL WALBIDI, born 1983, ALL THE JILA, 2007, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, date, medium, size and Short Street Gallery cat. 24318DIMENSIONS: 120.0 x 160.0 cmPROVENANCE: Short Street Gallery, BroomeAP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Short Street Gallery that states: ‘This is all the jila in my country including Larrparti, Kawarr, Jurntiwa and Wirrgujajila (living water). This Yulparija country is in the Great Sandy Desert in Western Australia near the Percival Lakes.’In 2007, Daniel Walbidi accompanied a number of Yulparitja elders, including his father Harry Bullen (Nabiru), on a journey from Bidyadanga back to their traditional lands around Winpa and Kirriwirri in the Great Sandy Desert. The visit was intended to reinvigorate the ancestral connections between the Yulparitja and their country, and was a watershed learning experience for the young Walbidi. It was also the first time he saw his country from the air, an experience that was to have a profound effect on his painting.1 Painted later that same year, All the Jila maps out all the freshwater sites at Karrparti, Kawarr, Jurntiwa and Wirrguja within a tapestry of colour and forms that was to become the hallmark of Walbidi’s painting. Studying art at school and university, Walbidi was inspired by Aboriginal artists such as Albert Namatjira, Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri, and closer to home, Rover Thomas whose customary lands lie adjacent to those of the Yulparitja. In 2008, Walbidi was selected for the Xstrata Emerging Indigenous Art Award at the Gallery of Modern Art in Brisbane. In 2009, his work was included in Contemporary Aboriginal Painting from Australia, the first exhibition of modern Aboriginal art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and in 2012, he was selected for unDisclosed, the second National Indigenous Art Triennial at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.WALLY CARUANA1. The Australian Broadcasting Commission (ABC) produced Desert Heart, a documentary film on the journey narrated by Walbidi. It was screened in March 2008.

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WEAVER JACK, (c.1928 – 2010), LUNGARUNG, 2006, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: WEAVER JACK, (c.1928 – 2010), LUNGARUNG, 2006, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, date, medium, size and Short Street Gallery cat. 11171DIMENSIONS: 119.0 x 119.0 cmPROVENANCE: Short Street Gallery, Broome AP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Short Street Gallery that states: ‘This is my country, Lungarung country. It is on the Canning Stock Road in the Great Sandy Desert in Western Australia. This is where I was born. I travelled around this place as a young woman walking through the sand dunes (tali) collecting mayi (bush food) with my mother. We hunted kuwi (meat) and sat down there. We didn’t have clothes then. I had two brothers. It is this side (west side) of Winpa in Western Australia. It is desert country, proper one. It is my country. We get him bush onion (junta), near the jila[living water]. We sing for him and there is plenty there. We grind him up and cook him. He is good mungarri (bush tucker). There is a warla (mud flats) there.’

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WEAVER JACK, (c.1928 – 2010), LUNGARUNG, 2007, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: WEAVER JACK, (c.1928 – 2010), LUNGARUNG, 2007, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, date, medium, size and Short Street Gallery cat. 24213DIMENSIONS: 138.0 x 97.0 cmPROVENANCE: Short Street Gallery, Broome AP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Short Street Gallery that states: ‘Weaver Jack paints her traditional country south of Well 33 on the Canning Stock Route. When she first started to paint, the outlines of the country were laid bare on the canvas. Like a skeleton of the country, slowly she reclaimed this country dotting over it loosely at first. She said these were her people walking all around that country, collecting mayi (bush food) and hunting for kuwi (meat). Slowly the country merged with the people. It was then she started putting herself in the paintings and through her paintings, Weaver managed to reclaim her country. Each turn of her brush captures the intimacy in which she knows her subject. It is an intimacy that is almost impossible to comprehend. It is an extension of herself. She takes discordant colours which represent all things she eats and the seemingly disordered is transformed and placed very deliberately in its right place, revealing perfection. For Weaver, she and her land are inseparable: they are the same. We realise this does not fit in with conventional Western views of portraiture, but portraiture is about extending our perceptions of who we are. To understand Weaver, one must know her land, because they exist together and define each other.’

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KALAJU ALMA WEBOU, (c.1928 – 2009), PINKALARTA, 2005, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: KALAJU ALMA WEBOU, (c.1928 – 2009), PINKALARTA, 2005, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, medium, size and Short Street Gallery cat. 27835DIMENSIONS: 151.0 x 151.0 cmPROVENANCE: Short Street Gallery, Broome The Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Short Street Gallery that states: ‘Alma paints Pinkalarta, the home where both she and her mother grew up. It is located in the Great Sandy Desert near Joanna Springs on Anna Plains Station in Western Australia. This is where she lost her mother and sister. Her work gives an aerial view of the landscape, showing the mayi (bush food) and the jila (living water). Alma is part of the Yulparija people who were forced to leave their homelands when the water began to dry up. She found her new home in the coastal town of Bidyadanga and as a result, her desert imagery is expressed with the vibrant contrasts of the saltwater landscape.’

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MIYAPU MARY MERIBIDA, (c.1930 – 2015), UNTITLED, 2010, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: MIYAPU MARY MERIBIDA, (c.1930 – 2015), UNTITLED, 2010, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, date, medium, size and Short Street Gallery cat. 27639DIMENSIONS: 100.0 x 100.0 cmPROVENANCE: Short Street Gallery, Broome Harvey Art Projects, Ketchum, Idaho, USAThe Luczo Family Collection, USA This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Short Street Gallery

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LYDIA BALBAL, born c.1958, KULAMPURRU, 2010, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: LYDIA BALBAL, born c.1958, KULAMPURRU, 2010, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, medium, size and Short Street Gallery cat. 27616DIMENSIONS: 150.0 x 180.0 cmPROVENANCE: Short Street Gallery, BroomeHarvey Art Projects, Ketchum, Idaho, USAThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Short Street Gallery that states: ‘Lydia says, “this is a well made of wood, whiteman, he put him on that Kulampurrujila (living water). This is my country, Mangala country. I be walking, I be big girl hunting dog, pussycat. My brothers and grandmother we see that well. Easy clean drinking water there.”’

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NALDJA BULLEN, born 1954, WARLU COUNTRY, 2010, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

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Description: NALDJA BULLEN, born 1954, WARLU COUNTRY, 2010, synthetic polymer paint on canvasSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, date, medium, size and Short Street Gallery cat. 27459DIMENSIONS: 105.5 x 106.0 cmPROVENANCE: Short Street Gallery, Broome Harvey Art Projects, Ketchum, Idaho, USAThe Luczo Family Collection, USAThis painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Short Street Gallery

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MARGARET BARAGURRA, born c.1935, GALLI GALLI, 2007, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

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Description: MARGARET BARAGURRA, born c.1935, GALLI GALLI, 2007, synthetic polymer paint on canvasSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, date, medium, size and Short Street Gallery cat. 24244DIMENSIONS: 135.0 x 136.5 cmPROVENANCE: Short Street Gallery, BroomeAP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Short Street Gallery that states: ‘Margaret says “Galli Galli is these two big jila [living water]. They bush way Winpa and Lungarung way. All the jila[living water]belong us. The whole country belong us. The moon over this one.” Margaret’s country is in the Great Sandy Desert in Western Australia, near the Percival Lakes and Well 33 on the Canning Stock Route.’

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ROVER THOMAS (JOOLAMA), (c.1926 – 1998), RUBY PLAINS MASSACRE 1, 1985, natural earth pigments and bush gum on canvas

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Description: ROVER THOMAS (JOOLAMA), (c.1926 – 1998), RUBY PLAINS MASSACRE 1, 1985, natural earth pigments and bush gum on canvas DIMENSIONS: 90.0 x 180.0 cmPROVENANCE: Commissioned in 1985 by Mary Macha, Perth Holmes à Court Collection, Heytesbury, Western Australia (accession no. 1260)Sotheby's, Sydney, 24 June 2002, lot 113Private collectionSotheby's, Sydney, 25 November 2007, lot 79The Luczo Family Collection, USARELATED WORK:Ruby Plains Killing 2, 1990, in the collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, illus. in Thomas, R., et al., Roads Cross: The Paintings of Rover Thomas, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 1994, p. 45Bedford Downs Massacre, 1987, illus. in Carrigan, B., Rover Thomas: I want to paint, Holmes à Court Gallery, Perth, 2003, cat. 11Bedford Downs Massacre, 1985, illus. in Carrigan, B., Rover Thomas: I want to paint, Holmes à Court Gallery, Perth, 2003, cat. 12ESSAY: Originally in the Holmes à Court Collection, this painting is one of the first produced by Rover Thomas that concerns the killings of Aboriginal people in the eastern Kimberley that occurred from late 19th century through to the 1920s. The killings usually happened in retaliation for what was perceived by the cattle station owners as the theft of cattle by local Aboriginal people living in a traditional manner. The introduction of cattle in the Kimberley polluted the freshwater wells and streams that fed large game such as kangaroo and emu that Aboriginal people relied on for protein; deprived of that source, they resorted to hunting another type of meat that had become available. Rover Thomas’ paintings of these conflicts at Bedford Downs, Texas Downs and Ruby Plains cattle stations constitute a form of history painting, based upon not first-hand experience but oral history. Several of these paintings are held in the Holmes à Court Collection and National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. In Rover Thomas’ record of the Ruby Plains killing, he describes how the station owner and manager discover a group of men butchering a cow. They shoot two, maybe four men and decapitate them, placing the heads in hollow tree trunks. Over the following days, Aboriginal stockmen at Ruby Plains search for them and are led to the killing site by crows circling above. As a result, they abandon the cattle station which is forced to close. Significantly, while the majority of Thomas’ paintings are devoid of figurative imagery, those about the Ruby Plains killing contain an image of a skull inside a hollow tree trunk.WALLY CARUANA

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GEORGE MUNG MUNG, (c.1921 – 1991), LANKERRJI – DEATH ADDER SNAKE, 1987, ochres and bush gum on canvas

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Description: GEORGE MUNG MUNG, (c.1921 – 1991), LANKERRJI – DEATH ADDER SNAKE, 1987, ochres and bush gum on canvasSIGNED: bears inscription on the surface of the painting: Lankerrji / Death Adder Snakebears inscription verso: No. 56 / A122DIMENSIONS: 90.0 x 230.0 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Warmun (Turkey Creek), Western AustraliaLord McAlpine of West GreenSotheby's, Melbourne, 29 July 1990, lot 176 Private collection, MelbourneSotheby's, Melbourne, 24 July 2007, lot 120The Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: A prominent cultural leader and elder of the Gija people, George Mung Mung was one of the first artists at Warmun (Turkey Creek) to paint the boards carried in the GurirrGurirr (Krill Krill) ceremonies that described the destruction of Darwin by Cyclone Tracy, as revealed to Rover Thomas. Mung Mung was also among the first group of artists at Warmun to paint consistently for the public domain, developing a distinctive style of painting that incorporated both planar and profile views of the landscape as well as figurative imagery as seen in paintings such as Jirling the Hunter, 1989, in the collection of the National Gallery of Victoria, and Binoowoon country, 1990, in the collection of the National Gallery of Australia.1 In other paintings, figures of ancestral beings merge into features of the landscape. Lankerrji – Death Adder Snake, 1987 is, however, composed in a more overtly literal manner –although the rhythmic form of the snake echoed in the profile of the hills in the background infers a type of metamorphosis. Mung Mung, along with a number of other prominent local artists including Rover Thomas and Rusty Peters (born 1935), painted works on board and canvas intended as learning aids for the Gija students at the school at Warmun. The inscription in this painting, in a hand that is not that of the artist, suggests that it was originally made for the school before it passed into the collection of the late Lord McAlpine, an avid collector of the art of the Kimberley. WALLY CARUANA1. See Ryan, J. and K. Akerman, (eds.), Images of Power: Aboriginal Art of the Kimberley, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 1993, p. 48, and Caruana, W., Aboriginal Art, World of Art Series, Thames and Hudson, London and New York, 2012, pl. 157, p. 180

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JARINYANU DAVID DOWNS, (1925 – 1995), DANCE OF KURTAL, 1988, synthetic polymer paint and natural earth pigments on linen

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Description: JARINYANU DAVID DOWNS, (1925 – 1995), DANCE OF KURTAL, 1988, synthetic polymer paint and natural earth pigments on linenSIGNED: signed verso: David Dowzs [sic] / jorijonubears inscription verso: size, cat. 010/88DIMENSIONS: 197.5 x 137.0 cmPROVENANCE: Commissioned by Duncan Kentish in 1988Bonython Meadmore Gallery, Sydney (label attached verso)Holmes à Court Collection, Heytesbury, Western Australia (label attached verso cat. 2548)Private collectionSotheby's, Sydney, 25 November 2007, lot 77The Luczo Family Collection, USAEXHIBITED: Jarinyanu David Downs, Bonython Meadmore Gallery, Sydney, 18 August – 13 September 1988, cat. 22 (illus. in exhibition catalogue and front cover)ESSAY: The following excerpt is quoted from Kentish, D., Jarinyanu David Downs, exhibition catalogue, Bonython Meadmore Gallery, Sydney, 1988The original accompanying certificate of authenticity stated in part: 'Kurtal is a Storm Being from the Ngarangarni – the Walmajarri word for the Dreaming. [...] When Kurtal entered Jarinyanu's country he was nearing the end of his journey. [...] Before a gathering of people from this area, Kurtal danced his final dance, metamorphosed into a snake, and sank into the earth where he remains today in a permanent rockhole spring. This spring supplied a reliable supply of water in all seasons, but in addition the old man would perform rituals at this site during the hot weather season to make Kurtal bring rain. [...] He is held to be responsible for and present within those particularly dramatic storms that usher in the break of the rainy season. [...][Dance of Kurtal, 1988] reveals Kurtal generating storms, with his arms and head enveloped in a cloud streaked with lightning and dust. A vertical snake motif suggests Kurtal's face is simultaneously the head of a snake, prefiguring his approaching metamorphosis. A band of cloud at his waist divides earth from sky. The lower section shows a grouping of women, girls and young boys. The women wear a vertical-striped body paint while the boys are painted with a snake motif.'

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WAKARTU CORY SURPRISE, (c.1929 – 2011), PAKARNU, 2008, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

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Description: WAKARTU CORY SURPRISE, (c.1929 – 2011), PAKARNU, 2008, synthetic polymer paint on canvasSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Mangkaja Arts cat. 364/08DIMENSIONS: 118.0 x 120.0 cmPROVENANCE: Mangkaja Arts, Fitzroy Crossing AP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Mangkaja Arts that states: ‘This is my country, my family’s country, we bin walk everywhere here around. No trees here nothing this jila[living water] here he names Pakarnu.’

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WAKARTU CORY SURPRISE, (c.1929 – 2011), DUBBU, 2008, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

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Description: WAKARTU CORY SURPRISE, (c.1929 – 2011), DUBBU, 2008, synthetic polymer paint on canvasSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Mangkaja Arts cat. 392/08DIMENSIONS: 120.0 x 120.0 cmPROVENANCE: Mangkaja Arts, Fitzroy Crossing AP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Mangkaja Arts that states: ‘Her dreaming (Dagu) her country. The waterhole is the place where she grew up.’

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TJIGILA NADA RAWLINS, born c.1936, LANGA, 2010, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

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Description: TJIGILA NADA RAWLINS, born c.1936, LANGA, 2010, synthetic polymer paint on canvasSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Mangkaja Arts cat. 481/10DIMENSIONS: 59.5 x 88.5 cmPROVENANCE: Mangkaja Arts, Fitzroy Crossing Harvey Art Projects, Ketchum, Idaho, USAThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Mangkaja Arts that states: ‘This is a big permanent water hole in the desert country of Nada’s mother and father. The jiljis and dunes and bush tucker surround the water hole, after the rain they would carry marra to scoop the water and the bidgi to carry the water back to camp. Mother and father would camp near with a big mob close to water and pretty good bush tucker.’

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ENRAELD DJULABINYANA MUNKARA, (1882 – 1968), DOUBLE-SIDED FIGURE REPRESENTING BIMA AND PURUKAPALI, c.1955, natural earth pigments on carved ironwood

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Description: ENRAELD DJULABINYANA MUNKARA, (1882 – 1968), DOUBLE-SIDED FIGURE REPRESENTING BIMA AND PURUKAPALI, c.1955, natural earth pigments on carved ironwoodDIMENSIONS: 51.0 cm heightPROVENANCE: Created on Melville Island, c.1955Dorothy Bennett Collection, DarwinThe Wesfarmers Collection, PerthSotheby's, Sydney, November 1997, lot 39 (illus. catalogue cover)Private collection, SydneyAP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USARELATED WORK:Purukapali and Bima, c.1955, in the collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, illus. in Caruana, W., Aboriginal Art, Thames and Hudson, London, 2003, pl. 73, p. 90The Grief of Bima, c.1965, in the collection of the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, illus. in O’Ferrell, M.A., Keepers of the Secrets; Aboriginal Art from the collection of the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, 1990, pl. 27, p. 32 The Artist in Pukumani for his Brother, c.1960, in the collection of National Museum of Australia, Canberra, illus. in Luthi, B., et al. Aratjara: Art of the First Australians, Dumont, Cologne, 1993, p. 158According to the original collection annotations, the figure on the reverse with only one breast represents Bima's friend. However, the single breasted figure may represent Bima, after her child has died.

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PADDY HENRY (TEEAMPI) RIPINGIMPI, (c.1925 – 1999), UNTITLED (TIWI FIGURE), c.1975, natural earth pigments on carved ironwood

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Description: PADDY HENRY (TEEAMPI) RIPINGIMPI, (c.1925 – 1999), UNTITLED (TIWI FIGURE), c.1975, natural earth pigments on carved ironwoodDIMENSIONS: 76.0 cm heightPROVENANCE: Created on Melville Island, Northern TerritoryPrivate collection, DarwinSotheby's, Sydney, 24 July 2007, lot 203The Luczo Family Collection, USAEXHIBITED: Melbourne University Press, Melbourne, 2012, p. 215Birdman, 1975, in the collection of National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, illus. in Caruana W., Aboriginal Art, World of Art Series, Thames and Hudson, London and New York, 2012, pl. 74, p. 91LITERATURE: Isaacs, J., Tiwi: Art / History / Culture, The Miegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2012, p. 215 (illus.)RELATED WORK:Pukumani Figure, c.1975 and Man and Bird, c.1975 illus. in Isaacs , J., Tiwi: Art/History/Culture, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne, 2012, p. 215Birdman, 1975, in the collection of National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, illus. in Caruana W., Aboriginal Art, World of Art Series, Thames and Hudson, London and New York, 2012, pl. 74, p. 91

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AURANGNAMIRRI WOMMATAKIMMI, (c.1920 – 1973), UNTITLED, (DOUBLE-SIDED TIWI FIGURE), c.1960, natural earth pigments on carved hardwood

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Description: AURANGNAMIRRI WOMMATAKIMMI, (c.1920 – 1973), UNTITLED, (DOUBLE-SIDED TIWI FIGURE), c.1960, natural earth pigments on carved hardwoodDIMENSIONS: 85.5 cm heightPROVENANCE: Created on Melville Island, c.1960The Louis A. Allen Collection, acquired in the Northern Territory in the early 1970sPrivate Collection, California,Thence by descent Private Collection, California, acquired from the aboveSotheby's, New YorkThe Luczo Family Collection, USA, purchased from the above by private treaty in 2007

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BEN TIPUNGWUTI, (c.1916 – 1979), UNTITLED (TIWI FIGURE), c.1960, natural earth pigments, resin and hair on carved ironwood

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Description: BEN TIPUNGWUTI, (c.1916 – 1979), UNTITLED (TIWI FIGURE), c.1960, natural earth pigments, resin and hair on carved ironwoodDIMENSIONS: 62.0 cm heightPROVENANCE: Created at Nguiu, Bathurst Island Stephen Kellner Gallery, Sydney Private collection, SydneySotheby's, Melbourne, 24 July 2007, lot 75The Luczo Family Collection, USAThis work was originally sold with a copy of a letter from Brother John Pye, the Head of St Therese’s Mission on Nguiu, Bathurst Island written in 1977, whereby he identified the carving as ‘definitely’ by Ben Tipungwuti, from an earlier period in time. In the letter he recounts how the first figurative carvings were created on Bathurst Island in 1952 and that the decoration is representative of body markings, reflecting the artist’s tribal skin group.

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MANI-LUKI (HARRY CARPENTER) WOMMATAKIMMI, (c.1914 – 1980) , PURUKAPALI AND BIMA, 1962, natural earth pigments on carved softwood

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Description: MANI-LUKI (HARRY CARPENTER) WOMMATAKIMMI, (c.1914 – 1980) , PURUKAPALI AND BIMA, 1962, natural earth pigments on carved softwoodDIMENSIONS: 49.5 and 48.5 cm heightPROVENANCE: Private collection, Adelaide, acquired at Milikapiti, Melville Island, 1962Sotheby's Australia, Melbourne, 24 July 2007, lot 76The Luczo Family Collection, USALITERATURE: Isaacs, J., Tiwi: Art / History / Culture, The Miegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2012, p. 69 (illus. as ‘Macassan Figures’)RELATED WORK:Maccassan Captains Wife, 1960s and Maccassan Ship Captain, 1960s, in the collection of the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, illus. in O’Ferrall, M. A., Keepers of the Secrets: Aboriginal Art from Arnhem Land in the Collection of the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, 1990, pl. 23, 24, p. 31

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MANI-LUKI (HARRY CARPENTER) WOMMATAKIMMI, (c.1914 – 1980) , BIMA, c.1965, natural earth pigments on carved softwood

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Description: MANI-LUKI (HARRY CARPENTER) WOMMATAKIMMI, (c.1914 – 1980) , BIMA, c.1965, natural earth pigments on carved softwoodDIMENSIONS: 47.5 cm heightPROVENANCE: Created on Melville Island, Northern TerritoryJim Davidson, Melbourne, acquired c.1965Joel Fine Art, Melbourne, 5 June 2007, lot 43The Luczo Family Collection, USARELATED WORK:Purukapali, 1960s Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, illus. in O’Ferrall, M. A., Keepers of the Secrets: Aboriginal Art from Arnhem Land in the Collection of the Art Gallery of Western Australia, in the collection of the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, 1990, pl. 19, p. 30

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LAME TOBY MUNGATOPI, (c.1920 – DECEASED), PURUKAPALI, c.1955, natural earth pigments on carved hardwood

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Description: LAME TOBY MUNGATOPI, (c.1920 – DECEASED), PURUKAPALI, c.1955, natural earth pigments on carved hardwoodDIMENSIONS: 98.5 cm heightPROVENANCE: Created on Melville Island, in the late 1960sJerome Gould, Los Angeles Private collection, USASotheby's, Sydney, 20 October 2008, lot 75The Luczo Family Collection, USARELATED WORK:For other carvings by the artist see Holmes, S. Le Brun, The Goddess and the Moon Man: The Sacred Art of the Tiwi Aborigines, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1995, pp. 34, 36, 40, 51

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ARTIST UNKNOWN (BATHURST AND MELVILLE ISLANDS), , UNTITLED (TIWI HEAD), c.1960, natural earth pigments on carved hardwood

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Description: ARTIST UNKNOWN (BATHURST AND MELVILLE ISLANDS), , UNTITLED (TIWI HEAD), c.1960, natural earth pigments on carved hardwoodDIMENSIONS: 28.0 cm heightPROVENANCE: Private collection, SydneySotheby's Australia, Melbourne, 26 July 2010, lot 198The Luczo Family Collection, USA

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ARTIST UNKNOWN (BATHURST AND MELVILLE ISLANDS), , UNTITLED (TIWI FIGURE), c.1970, natural earth pigments on carved ironwood

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Description: ARTIST UNKNOWN (BATHURST AND MELVILLE ISLANDS), , UNTITLED (TIWI FIGURE), c.1970, natural earth pigments on carved ironwoodDIMENSIONS: 131.5 cm heightPROVENANCE: Dr Alan G. Solem, ChicagoThence by descentSotheby's, Melbourne, 24 November 2009, lot 127The Luczo Family Collection, USA

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ARTIST UNKNOWN (BATHURST AND MELVILLE ISLANDS), , A PUKUMANI POLE, 1982, natural earth pigments on carved ironwood

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Description: ARTIST UNKNOWN (BATHURST AND MELVILLE ISLANDS), , A PUKUMANI POLE, 1982, natural earth pigments on carved ironwoodDIMENSIONS: 310.0 cm heightPROVENANCE: AP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USA

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TIMOTHY COOK, born 1958, KULAMA, 2013, natural earth pigments and natural binders on linen

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Description: TIMOTHY COOK, born 1958, KULAMA, 2013, natural earth pigments and natural binders on linenSIGNED: bears inscriptions verso: artist’s name, Jilamara Arts and Crafts cat. 155-13DIMENSIONS: 200.0 x 200.0 cmPROVENANCE: Jilamara Arts & Crafts, Milikarpiti, Melville Island Harvey Art Projects, Ketchum, Idaho, USA The Luczo Family Collection, USAEXHIBITED: We Are Tiwi: Jilamara and Munupi Artists, Harvey Art Projects, Ketchum, Idaho, USA, 1 – 30 July 2013, cat. 2 (illus. on exhibition catalogue cover)

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FRANCESCA PURUNTATAMERI, born 1965, JILAMARA DESIGN, 2013, natural earth pigments and synthetic binder on linen

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Description: FRANCESCA PURUNTATAMERI, born 1965, JILAMARA DESIGN, 2013, natural earth pigments and synthetic binder on linenDIMENSIONS: 243.5 x 183.5 cmPROVENANCE: Munupi Arts & Crafts, Melville Island (cat. 12FRA178)Harvey Art Projects, Ketchum, Idaho, USAThe Luczo Family Collection, USAEXHIBITED: We Are Tiwi: Jilamara and Munupi Artists, Harvey Art Projects, Ketchum, Idaho, USA, 1 – 30 July 2013, cat. 12 (illus.)

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LONG JACK PHILLIPUS TJAKAMARRA, (c.1938 – 1992), HUNTING, 1971, synthetic polymer powder paint on composition board

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Description: LONG JACK PHILLIPUS TJAKAMARRA, (c.1938 – 1992), HUNTING, 1971, synthetic polymer powder paint on composition boardSIGNED: bears inscription verso: 7003DIMENSIONS: 76.0 x 91.5 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Papunya in 1971Stuart Art Centre, Alice Springs (consignment 7, painting 3)Private collection, Northern TerritorySotheby's, Melbourne, 24 July 2007, lot 43The Luczo Family Collection, USAEXHIBITED: Tjukurrtjanu: Origins of Western Desert Art, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 30 September 2011 – 12 February 2012; Musée du Quai Branly, Paris, 9 October 2012 – 20 January 2013 (label attached verso)RELATED WORK:Children’s Kadaitcha Dreaming, 1972, in Bardon, G., Papunya Tula, Art of the Western Desert, McPhee Gribble, Melbourne, 1991, p. 62 (illus.)Big Kangaroo Ceremonial Dreaming, 1971 in Bardon, G., and Bardon, J., Papunya, A Place Made After the Story: The Beginnings of the Western Desert Painting Movement, The Miegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2004, painting 129, p. 220 (illus.)ESSAY: A resident of Papunya, Long Jack Phillipus Tjakamarra is one of the men credited with founding the Western Desert art movement. His oeuvre encompasses the evolution of desert painting from the initial representational depictions of ceremonial events on board to the creation of grand canvases that echo the scale of traditional ground mosaics. In the winter of 1971, Long Jack Phillipus was among those men who painted the Honey Ant Mural on the north-facing wall of the Papunya School. The convergence of Honey Ant ancestors from north, east, south and west at Papunya, was selected as the theme for the mural, for it showed that men from distinct language groups could work together on a common project and the education of their children.1At the same time in August 1971, Kaapa Tjampitjinpa won the Caltex Art Award in Alice Springs. The prize money he received inspired other men, including Phillipus, to take up the brush—the award being a potent demonstration that knowledge of inherited culture could provide a platform for gaining financial independence. Kaapa was the leader of the painting movement at Papunya during its first fragile years and his early works, such as the prize-winning Men’s Ceremony for the Kangaroo, Gulgardi, 1971, in the collection of the Araluen Arts Centre, established conventions that other artists subsequently emulated. In a period of experimentation and great excitement, representational works such as Long Jack Phillipus Tjakamarra’s Hunting, 1971, comprise a rare subset within the now famous boards that were created during Geoffrey Bardon’s tenure as art teacher at Papunya. Historian Vivien Johnson has astutely characterised this subset as belonging to the ‘School of Kaapa’.2 Always controversial for the revelation of restricted aspects of men’s ceremonial life, these paintings provide a vivid snapshot of the ceremonies that informed subsequent, more encrypted paintings on canvas.3The work on offer, Hunting, is a powerful example of the ‘School of Kaapa’. It shows two men kneeling and painting for ceremony. Objects that affirm their manhood surround the men: boomerangs, stone knives, spear throwers and spears. The inclusion of kutitji (softwood shields) could provide a clue to the precise ancestors that Phillipus envisioned, for ‘hunting’ is a generic title that does not capture the complexity of the scene portrayed. The presence of bullroarers suggests the gravity of the ceremony, while the large oval ceremonial objects, that appear to float above the hardened earth of the corroboree ground also emphasise the seriousness of the subject. Hunting is among the finest of the ‘School of Kaapa’ productions with its austere black background upon which each object is exquisitely detailed. Featuring a combination of perspectival and planar view, at a different scale of resolution, it is a beguiling, almost symmetrical representation, providing a rare window into the aesthetics of ceremonial practice.JOHN KEAN1. Bardon, G. and Bardon, J., Papunya: A Place Made After the Story: The Beginnings of the Western Desert Painting Movement, TheMiegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2004, pp. 12–192. Johnson, V., Once Upon a Time in Papunya, University of New South Wales Press, Sydney, 2010, pp.11–443. ibid, pp. 100–138

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KAAPA TJAMPITJINPA, (c.1926 – 1989), BUDGERIGAR DREAMING (VERSION 6), 1972, synthetic polymer powder paint on composition board

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Description: KAAPA TJAMPITJINPA, (c.1926 – 1989), BUDGERIGAR DREAMING (VERSION 6), 1972, synthetic polymer powder paint on composition boardSIGNED: signed verso: KOAAAP [sic]DIMENSIONS: 91.5 x 65.0 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Papunya in June 1972The W.L. Jackson Collection of Early Western Desert Paintings, Victoria Sotheby's, Melbourne, 28 June 1999, lot 69Private collection, VictoriaSotheby's, Melbourne, 31 July 2006, lot 81The Luczo Family Collection, USAEXHIBITED: On long-term loan to the Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide from March 2007 to late 2015 and exhibited in the Collection Galleries, Art Gallery of South Australia, 27 March 2007 – 27 August 2010Tjukurrtjanu: Origins of Western Desert Art, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 30 September 2011 – 12 February 2012; Musée du Quai Branly, Paris, 9 October 2012 – 20 January 2013 (label attached verso)Big Country, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, 31 August 2013 – 19 January 2014LITERATURE: Bardon, G., Papunya Tula, Art of the Western Desert, McPhee Gribble, Melbourne, 1991, p. 111 (illus.)Bardon, G. and Bardon, J., Papunya, A Place Made After the Story: The Beginnings of the Western Desert Painting Movement, The Miegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2004, painting 216, p. 280, and a photograph showing the artist painting this work is reproduced on p. 278.ESSAY: Kaapa Tjampitjinpa was the most influential artist working at Papunya in the early 1970s. Bardon regarded him ‘as a man of fabulous brilliance, a classically compulsive artist’. His authority and expertise was also recognised by senior custodians who charged him with the responsibility of being ‘principal artist’ for the Honey Ant Mural at the Papunya School.1 As a result of his preeminence, Kaapa was able to secure larger boards and better brushes than his peers; moreover his priority ensured that he was paid significantly more for his work than other artists. Budgerigar Dreaming (Version 6), 1972 is a consummate example of the first phase of Kaapa’s artistic achievement. Kaapa did not have a compliant nature. He railed under the controlling mantle of government’s policy of assimilation and was dismissed as a ‘troublemaker’. He came to the attention of authorities precisely because he sought to forge a new direction, based on an assumption of his equality and entitlement. A canny entrepreneur, Kaapa’s insouciance was in stark contrast to the governing expectation that the Indigenous residents of Papunya should submit to an extended ‘traineeship’ under European supervision. His independent spirit found abundant expression in revolutionary visual form. Kaapa is now rightly recognized as the founder, and first master of the contemporary Aboriginal art movement in Central Australia.2Kaapa grew up at Napperby, in Anmatyerr country, with his Anmatyerr cousins, Tim Leura, Clifford Possum and Bill Stockman. As a young man, he worked as a stockman on stations across Central Australia, droving cattle as far as Mt Isa, Queensland. Kaapa and his cousins shared familial relationships with Western Arrernte families based at Hermannsburg Mission, and were well aware of the income and notoriety generated by Albert Namatjira, the most famous individual in the Centre. Kaapa also aspired to become an artist. By the spring of 1971, Kaapa had abandoned the use of perspective, instead he set out on a program of formal experimentation. Often working in association with Leura, the cousins pioneered an analytical planar view, through which they strived to achieve perfectly balanced arrangements of ceremonial objects and icons within a governing rectangular format. Bardon regards the current work as Kaapa’s ‘ultimate achievement’.3 and it is certainly the most exquisitely resolved of a series of ten Budgerigar Dreaming boards he painted in the winter of 1972. Kaapa’s meticulous experiments mirror the mathematical exertions of Euclid, and the artists of classical antiquity, who determined to manifest the ‘golden ratio’. The divine geometry of Kaapa’sBudgerigar Dreaming is derived from the equilibrium established between an understated centerline, around which objects are dynamically displaced. The center of the composition remains unadorned, apart from a customary motif, representing two ancestors adjacent to a ground design evoked by a perfectly executed set of concentric circles. Governed by the principal of diametric symmetry, adjacent panels are animated with objects and signs associated with the celebration of Atetherr (Budgerigar) ancestors. Sacred objects that had previously been expressed in graphic detail are refined to become sets of lines, which indicate the material presence of the objects, without disclosing details of their construction. The whole composition is anchored with attenuated (yellow ochre) oval objects, radiating diagonally towards each corner. The tiny white arrows, shown ‘flying’ toward the ceremonial ground indicate the ‘tracks’ of Atetherr. They evoke vast flocks of Budgerigars that congregate at water places across arid Australia. Not only do the traces of the Atetherr refer to frequently observed natural phenomena, but they also prompt an analogy between the massing birds and the eagerness of post-initiate men who congregate on the ceremonial ground, thirsty for the knowledge of the elders. The compositional template on which Budgerigar Dreaming is based exerted a significant influence on Kaapa’s peers. Moreover his use of Atetherr ‘tracks’to animate the background, prefigure the emergence of a dotted infill, that, in the later part of 1972, would become a dominant feature of Papunya painting. Budgerigar Dreaming (Version 6), 1972 is a critical work in the history of desert art, for not only does it encapsulate a period of vibrant experimentation but also forecasts key attributes that would come to define Papunya Tula painting. JOHN KEAN1. Bardon, G. and Bardon, J., Papunya: A Place Made After the Story: The Beginnings of the Western Desert Painting Movement, TheMiegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2004, pp. 12 – 192. Johnson, V., Once Upon a Time in Papunya, University of New South Wales Press, Sydney, 2010, pp. 11 – 433. Bardon, G. and Bardon, J., Papunya: A Place Made After the Story: The Beginnings of the Western Desert Painting Movement, TheMiegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2004, p. 280

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TOMMY LOWRY TJAPALTJARRI, (c.1935 – 1987), WOMAN'S DREAMING, 1972, synthetic polymer powder paint on board

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Description: TOMMY LOWRY TJAPALTJARRI, (c.1935 – 1987), WOMAN'S DREAMING, 1972, synthetic polymer powder paint on boardSIGNED: bears inscription verso: 14008DIMENSIONS: 46.5 x 65.0 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Papunya in 1972Stuart Art Centre, Alice Springs (label attached verso, consignment 14, painting 8)Private collectionSotheby's, Melbourne, 30 June 1997, lot 211Private collection, SydneySotheby's, Melbourne, 31 July 2006, lot 78The Luczo Family Collection, USALITERATURE: Bardon, G., and Bardon, J., Papunya, A Place Made After the Story: The Beginnings of the Western Desert Painting Movement, The Miegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2004, painting 317, p. 367 (illus.) together with illustration of the original field notes and diagram by Geoffrey BardonESSAY: Originally a carver of wooden objects, Tommy Lowry Tjapaltjarri joined the first group of painters at Papunya in 1971 when Geoffrey Bardon encouraged the senior men to paint in European materials – thus leading to the formation of the cooperative Papunya Tula Artists. The main subject of Tjapaltjarri’s paintings are the Tingari ancestors, particularly in the guise of two Great Snakes in his customary lands country around Patjarr in the Gibson Desert in Western Australia – one of the most remote locations in the continent. Lowry’s early paintings refer to ceremony and the associated objects – for example, his earliest recorded painting from 1971, Three Corroboree Poles, in the Wilkerson Collection depicts ceremonial poles.1 Dating from the same period, Woman's Dreaming, 1972, depicts a ceremonial scene featuring eight decorated dancing boards that are carried by women in the ritual. The central roundel represents a waterhole from which rivulets stream to other ritual camps, while several red roundels represent campfires, indicating that this was a large ceremonial gathering.2 The women are symbolised by U-shapes adjacent to their coolamon that lie in front of them.WALLY CARUANA1. See inBenjamin, R and Weislogel, A.C. (eds.), Icons of the Desert: Early Aboriginal Paintings from Papunya, Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, New York, 2009, p. 802. Bardon, G. and Bardon, J., Papunya, A Place Made After the Story: The Beginnings of the Western Desert Painting Movement, TheMiegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2004, p. 367

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RONNIE TJAMPITJINPA, born c.1943, THE KADAITCHA MAN, 1993, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: RONNIE TJAMPITJINPA, born c.1943, THE KADAITCHA MAN, 1993, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: Papunya Tula Artists cat. RT930437DIMENSIONS: 121.0 x 61.0 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kintore in April 1993Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs Private collection, DarwinSotheby's, Melbourne, 31 July 2006, lot 104The Luczo Family Collection, USAEXHIBITED: On long term loan and exhibition at The Supreme Court of the Northern Territory, Darwin between 1993 and 2006RELATED WORK:Untitled, 1994, in the collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales, illus. in Perkins, H. ,and Fink, H. (eds), Papunya Tula: Genesis and Genius, Art Gallery of New South Wales in association with Papunya Tula Artists, Sydney, 2000, p. 127ESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artists that states in part: ‘This painting depicts a Kadaitcha Man (ritual killer) who lived in the vicinity of Marputrri to the south of Lake Mackay. He is said to be a young man who moves around this area.’Signifying ‘a malignant spirit… a man who has either been formally selected or goes out on his own initiative on a mission of vengeance against some individual accused of injuring someone by magic’,1 the term Kadaitcha is used colloquially among diverse language groups in Central Australia to describe a ritual killer. The origins of the word are surrounded in mystery, appropriately perhaps, because the modus operandi of the Kadaitcha is intentionally secret. Some regard the word Kadaitcha as being of Arrernte origin, while others suggest a more distant source, with the term first appearing in correspondence from the Colonial frontier in the late 1800s. It is important when interpreting The Kadaitcha Man, 1993, to note that the artist applies the title in the Pintupi vernacular sense. It is intended to convey something fearful about the behavior of a particular young man who carried out his lethal business at Marputrri, to the south of Lake Mackay. Therefore some aspects of the behavior of Kadaitcha (or ‘featherfoot’) described in the literature may not apply to this particular individual. A more relevant explanation of the liminal presence of malignant spirits in the region can be found in Hinkson’s accounts of jarnpa in neighboring Warlpiri country. Larry Jungarrayi, Jarnpa, 1953-4, in the collection of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, also transports the terrifying image of this ‘demon’ into our gaze.2Ronnie Tjampitjinpa’s full frontal evocation of the killer is all the more chilling for its simplicity. The killer’s head is shown as a set of expanding concentric circles, from which bands of power emanate into the landscape beyond the canvas. The body is suspended in the same bands, emphasising the apparent weightless by which ritual killers can approach their victims without notice, and escape without trace. In 1971, Tjampitjinpa participated in the first flowering of contemporary desert art at Papunya under the tutelage of his classificatory father, UtaUtaTjangala. In the early 1980s, when he returned to live on the land of his birth, Tjampitjinpa’s uncompromising creative character emerged. From that time his painting gained force, with broad bands of contrasting tones pressing hard at the perimeters of the rectangular format on which he painted. The bravura and physical presence of this composition discloses Tjampitjinpa as the most masculine and assertive of Pintupi painters. Tjampitjinpa’s paintings perfectly express his personal, political and ritual presence in the Pintupi homelands; he is unashamedly ‘the boss for his own country’. JOHN KEAN1. Dixon, R. M., et al. Australian Aboriginal Words in English: their Origin and Meaning, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 1990, p. 1562. Hinkson, M., Remembering the Future: Warlpiri Life through the Prism of Drawing, Aboriginal Studies Press, Canberra, 2014

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RONNIE TJAMPITJINPA, born c.1943, TINGARI AT WATANUMA, 2006, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: RONNIE TJAMPITJINPA, born c.1943, TINGARI AT WATANUMA, 2006, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. RT0612147DIMENSIONS: 242.5 x 181.0 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kintore in 2006Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsAP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artists that states: ‘This painting depicts body paint designs associated with a Water Dreaming at the Tingari site of Watanuma, north-west of the Kintore community. In ancestral times, two snakes travelled to this site from the east, only to find there was no water there. The lightning at the site wanted the snakes to leave the area so began spearing the ground. This caused the snakes to burrow deep into the ground which then created a large clay pan and soakages which remain today.

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RAY JAMES TJANGALA, born c.1958, TINGARI MEN AT YARUYARU, 2003, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: RAY JAMES TJANGALA, born c.1958, TINGARI MEN AT YARUYARU, 2003, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. RJ0303173DIMENSIONS: 181.0 x 151.0 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kiwirrkura in 2003Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsPrivate collection, IndonesiaJoel Fine Art, Melbourne, 5 June 2007, lot 72The Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artists that states: ‘This painting depicts designs associated with the site of Yaruyaru. In mythological times a large group of Tingari Men camped at this site before continuing their travels further north to Pinari. At this same time there was a group of women camping in the bush nearby.’

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GEORGE WARD TJUNGURRAYI, born c.1945, KAAKURATINTJA (LAKE MACDONALD), 2003, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: GEORGE WARD TJUNGURRAYI, born c.1945, KAAKURATINTJA (LAKE MACDONALD), 2003, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. GW0306127DIMENSIONS: 181.5 x 152.5 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kintore in 2003Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsScott Livesey Galleries, Melbourne The Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artiststhat states: ‘This painting depicts designs associated with Kaakuratintja (Lake MacDonald). In mythological times a large group of Tingari Men travelled to this site from Kulkuta, south-west of the Tjukula Community. The Kuningka (Western Quoll) Dreaming also travelled this same route.’

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GEORGE TJUNGURRAYI, born c.1943, KIRRIMALUNYA, 2009, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: GEORGE TJUNGURRAYI, born c.1943, KIRRIMALUNYA, 2009, synthetic polymer paint on linen SIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. GT0902014DIMENSIONS: 181.5 x 243.5 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kintore in 2009Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsHarvey Art Projects, Ketchum, Idaho, USAThe Luczo Family Collection, USAEXHIBITED: Papunya Tula Artists: Masters of the Western Desert, Harvey Art Projects, Ketchum, Idaho, USA, 25 December 2013 – 10 February 2014, (illus. in exhibition catalogue and inside back cover)ESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate from Papunya Tula Artists that states in part: ‘The design in this painting depicts the claypan site of Kirrimalunya, north of Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). In ancestral times two Ngangkari (Aboriginal healers) were camped at this site. The two were only young boys, but often this healing power is given to Ngangkaris by the time they are young teenagers. This ancestral story forms part of the Tingari Cycle [...].These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.’

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RAY JAMES TJANGALA, born c.1958, YUNALA, 2005, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: RAY JAMES TJANGALA, born c.1958, YUNALA, 2005, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. RJ0502086DIMENSIONS: 121.5 x 121.5 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kiwirrkura in 2005Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsAP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artiststhat states: ‘This painting depicts designs associated with the soakage water site of Yunala, west of Kiwirrkura in Western Australia. In mythological times a large group of Tingari Men camped at this site before continuing their travels further east to Pinari, north-west of the Kintore Community. While at Yunala they gathered the edible roots of the bush banana or silky pear vine Marsdeniaaustralis, alsoknown as yunala which is plentiful in this region.’

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GEORGE WARD TJUNGURRAYI, born c.1945, KAAKURATINTJA (LAKE MACDONALD), 2003, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: GEORGE WARD TJUNGURRAYI, born c.1945, KAAKURATINTJA (LAKE MACDONALD), 2003, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. GW0311217DIMENSIONS: 149.5 x 182.0 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kintore in 2003Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsPrivate collection, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artiststhat states: ‘This painting depicts designs associated with Kaakuratintja (Lake MacDonald). In mythological times a large group of Tingari Men travelled to this site from Kulkuta, south west of the Tjukula Community. The Kuningka (Western Quoll) Dreaming also travelled this same route.’

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WARLIMPIRRINGA TJAPALTJARRI, born c.1959, MARAWA, 2005, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: WARLIMPIRRINGA TJAPALTJARRI, born c.1959, MARAWA, 2005, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artist’s cat. WT0504168DIMENSIONS: 121.0 x 122.0 cm PROVENANCE: Painted at Kiwirrkura in 2005Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsAP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artists that states: ‘This painting depicts designs associated with the swamp site of Marawa, west of Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). There is both a rockhole and soakage water at this site. During mythological times a large group of Tingari Men travelled to Marawa from the west, and after arriving at the site, entered a rockhole and continued travelling underground.’

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JOHNNY YUNGUT TJUPURRULA, born c.1930, TJUNGIMANTRA, 2002, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: JOHNNY YUNGUT TJUPURRULA, born c.1930, TJUNGIMANTRA, 2002, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size, Papunya Tula Artists cat. JY0210029 and Alison Kelly Gallery cat. AKG613DIMENSIONS: 181.5 x 151.0 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kintore in 2002Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsAlison Kelly Gallery, MelbournePrivate collection, SydneyJoel Fine Art, Melbourne, 16 October 2006, lot 22 The Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artiststhat states: ‘This painting depicts designs associated with Tjungimanta, a site with several soakage waters just to the north east of the Kiwirrkura community. In mythological times a large group of Tingari Men came from the west and passed through this site during their travels to Lake Mackay.’

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GEORGE TJUNGURRAYI, born c.1943, CLAYPAN SITE OF MAMULTJULKULNGA, 2005, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: GEORGE TJUNGURRAYI, born c.1943, CLAYPAN SITE OF MAMULTJULKULNGA, 2005, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. GT0509213DIMENSIONS: 182.0 x 243.0 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Alice Springs in 2005Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsHamiltons Gallery, London The Luczo Family Collection, USAEXHIBITED: Pintupi: 20 Contemporary Paintings from the Pintupi Homelands, Hamiltons Gallery, London, 28 June – 11 August 2006, cat. 3 (illus. in exhibition catalogue)ESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artiststhat states: ‘The lines in this painting depicts the sandhills surrounding the claypan site known as Mamultjulkulnga, on the west side of Lake Mackay. The artist’s father passed away at this site. After rain the claypan becomes a freshwater lake. In mythological times, two Tingari Men of the Tjangala and Tjapaltjarri kinship subsections camped at this site. They gathered the seeds known as mungilypa or samphire from the small fleshy sub-shrub Tecticorniaverrucosa. These seeds are ground into a paste which is cooked in the coals to form a type of unleavened bread.’George Tjungurrayi is counted among the most senior of Pintupi artists, an exemplar of the finely honed canvases that distinguish the Papunya Tula Artists. Tjungurrayi commenced his apprenticeship in the late in 1970s when assisting the founders of the movement on the mural-scaled canvases created at Papunya and its outstations. Older artists, such as Shorty LungkataTjungurrayi and Charlie Tarawa Tjungurrayi, drafted the intersecting paths of travelling ancestral heroes and established the palette and style of a particular work. Having cast the ‘image’, younger men, such as Tjungurrayi were called upon to assist painting the numerous bands of dotted infill that gave these great works such mesmerising vitality.1Tjungurrayi is a highly skilled and meticulous man who, during the 1980s, proved eminently capable of producing his own paintings of the travelling Tingari ancestors. His national breakthrough came in the late 1990s as Pintupi artists distilled more minimal means of describing ancient stories. The quality of Tjungurrayi’s vision was recognised with solo shows at Utopia Art Sydney, 1997 and Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, 1998 – landmark exhibitions comprised of serial works in which parallel bands of closely toned hues produced a dazzling effect. Tjungurrayi’s closely striped canvases thus transported the numinous realm of Pintupi metaphysics into the cool, neutral realm of the ‘white cube’.2Vivien Johnson has compared Tjungurrayi’s approach to the Op Art masterpieces of Bridget Riley. In contrast to the British artist, who produced her effects with the parsimonious application of self-leveling paint, Tjungurrayi’s canvases were painstakingly constructed, each line formed with two layers of closely applied ‘dots’ that merge to become a palpable rib. When touched, Tjungurrayi’s paintings reveal a micro-topography that rhymes with the vast dune fields of the Gibson Desert.3Physically, Tjungurrayi’s paintings echo the technique whereby Western Desert men would gouge the surface of hardwood weapons with finely wrought parallel grooves. The dynamism of Tjungurrayi’s designs evoke the Wundashields in which sets of parallel, fluted grooves articulate on an imagined line then change direction before continuing at another angle. The resemblance is particularly compelling as the parallel bands of the Wundaare heightened with alternating bands of red-ochre and white pipe-clay. Luke Scholes has written that Tjungurrayi had a direct influence on the work of his classificatory son and close countryman, Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri, and indeed, both artists paint the site featured in the current work, Mamultjulkulnga. The fine bands of both artists are believed to have their origins in natural phenomena, such as the bands of differing coloured earths that are created on the receding edges of claypans as they dry.4The power of Tjungurrayi’s enigmatic canvases emanates from the distillation of subtle details from a vast cryptic landscape. Through repetition, minimal signs come to represent a shimmering cosmological realm. JOHN KEAN1. Kean, J., 'A Big Canvas: MobilisingPintupi Painting', in Colliding Worlds: First Contact in the Western Desert 1932-1984, Museum Victoria Publishing, Melbourne, 2006, pp. 47–522. Johnson, V., Lives of the Papunya Tula Artists, IAD Press, Alice Springs, 2008, p. 1423. Ibid, p. 1404. Myers, F. R. and Scholes, L., 'Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri: Powerful presence in person and in paint', in No Boundaries: Aboriginal Australian Contemporary Abstract Painting from the Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection, DelMonico Books, Prestel, Munich, 2014, pp. 136

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PATRICK TJUNGURRAYI, born c.1935, MYLILILI, 2006, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: PATRICK TJUNGURRAYI, born c.1935, MYLILILI, 2006, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. PT0604033DIMENSIONS: 182.0 x 242.5 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kiwirrkura in 2006Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artists that states: ‘This painting depicts designs associated with the site of Mylilili, near Jupiter Well and west of the Kiwirrkurra community in Western Australia. In mythological times a large group of ancestral Tingari Men camped at this site before travelling south-east to Ngarru. At Ngarru the men performed the dances and sang the songs associated with the area. Upon completion of the ceremonies at Ngarru the men continued their travels north-east toward Kiwirrkura, eventually reaching Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay) via another lake site known as Pinari. As the men travelled they drank from various water sources found amongst the rocky outcrops. These rockholes and soakages are represented by the concentric squares running through the middle of the painting. The jagged lines represent rain making designs that were painted onto men’s bodies for ceremonial purposes.’

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PATRICK TJUNGURRAYI, born c.1935, TJIPARITJARRA, 2009, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: PATRICK TJUNGURRAYI, born c.1935, TJIPARITJARRA, 2009, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. PT0908041DIMENSIONS: 90.5 x 60.5 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kiwirrkura in 2009Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsHarvey Art Projects, Ketchum, Idaho, USA The Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artiststhat states: ‘This painting depicts designs associated with Tjiparitjarra, a site with a large hill, a series of shallow rockholes and soakage waters, west of the Kiwirrkurra in Western Australia. The zigzag motifs represent the tracks of Tingari Men as they travelled through the country as well as the water designs that were painted onto men’s bodies for ceremonial purposes. The men later travelled east to Tarkul and Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay).’

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RONNIE TJAMPITJINPA, born c.1943, WALUNGURRU, 2011, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: RONNIE TJAMPITJINPA, born c.1943, WALUNGURRU, 2011, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. RT1108008DIMENSIONS: 121.0 x 90.5 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kintore in 2011Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsHarvey Art Projects, Ketchum, Idaho, USA The Luczo Family Collection, USAEXHIBITED: Papunya Tula Artists 40 Years: Celebrating 40 Years of the Western Desert Art Movement, Harvey Art Projects, Ketchum, Idaho, USA, 14 February – 20 April 2012, cat. 2ESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artists that states: ‘This painting depicts body paint designs associated with the site of Walungurru or Kintore. In ancestral times angintaka (perentie) came to this site from the west. Two women tracked the ngintaka to Kintore and eventually found it. When the ngintaka died, it turned to stone and became the mountain, a very prominent landmark next to the Kintore community. This site is associated with the Tingari song cycle.’

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WILLY TJUNGURRAYI, born c.1930, KAAKURATINTJA (LAKE MACDONALD), 2003, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: WILLY TJUNGURRAYI, born c.1930, KAAKURATINTJA (LAKE MACDONALD), 2003, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Artists cat. WT0310260DIMENSIONS: 181.0 x 151.0 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kintore in 2003Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artists that states: ‘This painting depicts designs associated with the site of Kaakuratintja (Lake MacDonald) slightly west of Kintore. In mythological times a large group of Tingari Men, both young and old, travelled to this site from the west. As they approached a fierce hailstorm occurred which killed the entire group.’

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JOHNNY YUNGUT TJUPURRULA, born c.1930, TJUTALPI, 2003, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: JOHNNY YUNGUT TJUPURRULA, born c.1930, TJUTALPI, 2003, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. JY0304117DIMENSIONS: 121.5 x 121.5 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kiwirrkura in 2003Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsAP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artiststhat states: ‘This painting depicts designs associated with the soakage water site of Tjutalpi, east of the Kiwirrkura community. In mythological times a large group of Tingari Men passed through this site during their travels north to Lake Mackay.’

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DANNY GIBSON TJAPALTJARRI, born c.1976, TINGARI MEN AT MUKULA, 2009, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: DANNY GIBSON TJAPALTJARRI, born c.1976, TINGARI MEN AT MUKULA, 2009, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. DG0903082DIMENSIONS: 92.0 x 91.5 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kiwirrkura in 2009Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsHarvey Art Projects, Ketchum, Idaho, USAThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artiststhat states: ‘This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Mukula, situated in open flat country, just to the southwest of the Jupiter Well in Western Australia. In mythological times a large group of Tingari Men camped at this site for some time instructing the young before travelling to Kulkuta, west of the Tjukurla Community.’

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JOHN JOHN BENNETT TJAPANGATI, (c.1930 – 2002), UNTITLED (TRAVELS OF THE TINGARI), 2002, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: JOHN JOHN BENNETT TJAPANGATI, (c.1930 – 2002), UNTITLED (TRAVELS OF THE TINGARI), 2002, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. JJ0206098DIMENSIONS: 181.0 x 151.0 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kintore in 2002Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsAP Bond Gallery, Adelaide The Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artists that states: ‘This painting depicts the travels of a large group of Tingari men from Tjukula, north to Pirmal and then east to the important ceremonial cave site of Mitukatjirri, south-east of the Kintore community. They then continued through Kintore and further north-west to Pinari.’

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MAKINTI NAPANANGKA, (c.1930 – 2011), LUPULNGA, 2002, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: MAKINTI NAPANANGKA, (c.1930 – 2011), LUPULNGA, 2002, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. MN0212072DIMENSIONS: 183.0 x 152.5 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kintore in 2002Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsAP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate from Papunya Tula Artists that states: ‘This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Lupulnga, south of the Kintore Community. The Peewee (small bird) Dreaming is associated with this site. One small rockhole is shown. A group of women visited the site before continuing their travels north to Kintore. The lines in the painting represent spun hair-string which is used in the making of hair belts worn during the ceremonies associated with the area.’Painting had been the province of Pintupi men until Marina Strocchi ran a workshop for women at Kintore in 1994.1 Although the participants were between 60 and 75 years old, they embraced the opportunity with relish, as if making up for lost time. Whereas most Pintupi men worked in established styles, senior Pintupi women began rendering their stories with gusto, taking the movement in dynamic new directions. A diminutive woman who translated her love of dancing into a compelling urge to paint, Makinti Napanunka expresses a deep association with a tiny rockhole in the middle of a vast desert. While some artists choose to depict many different sites with which they are associated, Makinti’s paintings focus primarily on just one, Lupul(nga), a modest, rounded depression in exposed rock that collects precious rainwater, and notably, where she first encountered Europeans, with camels, during the early 1940s.2 It is a place that would be overlooked by all but the most perceptive of intruders. From 1996, when she began painting regularly, Makinti returned to Lupul in her imagination. Her tremulous lines were formed with a loaded brush, grasped at an acute angle, and pushed forcefully across the canvas evoking the first performance by the KungkaKutjarra (Two Women) at Lupul. The resulting contours signify the movement of nyimparra(pubic cover, made with hairstring) as women dance.3 In Makinti’s variant of desert minimalism, the nyimparra stand for both the site and the ceremony. The timbre of verses, sung to celebrate the travels of the KungkaKutjarrais embodied in the shift and sway of Makinti’s line. JOHN KEAN1. Marina Strocchi (coordinator at the Ikuntji Arts Centre at Haasts Bluff, 1992 – 97) initiated the workshop with the assistance of a group of senior women artists, resident at Haasts Bluff who maintained strong associations with their relatives at Walungurru/Kintore.2. Johnson, V., Lives of the Papunya Tula Artists, IAD Press, Alice Springs, 2008, p. 316.3. Personal communications, Vanessa Merlino (née Patterson), who worked closely with Pintupi women as a Field Officer for Papunya Tula Artists, 2005 – 10.

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YUKULTJI NAPANGATI, born 1970, YUNALA, 2005, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: YUKULTJI NAPANGATI, born 1970, YUNALA, 2005, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. YN0507057 DIMENSIONS: 91.0 x 122.0 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Kiwirrkura in 2005Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsThe Luczo Family Collection, USARELATED WORK:Untitled, 2005, in the collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, illus. in Perkins, H., Art and Soul: A Journey into Aboriginal Art, The Miegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2010, p. 75ESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate from Papunya Tula Artists that states: ‘This painting depicts designs associated with Yunala, a rockhole and soakage water site situated among sandhills just to the west of the Kiwirrkura community in Western Australia. A group of ancestral women camped at Yunala after approaching the site from further west. At Yunala the women gathered the edible roots of the bush banana vine Marsdeniaaustralis, also known in Pintupi as yunala, before continuing their journey north-east to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). The rows of parallel lines are the sandhills surrounding the rockhole at the site.’

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YINARUPA NANGALA, born c.1948, MUKULA, 2007, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: YINARUPA NANGALA, born c.1948, MUKULA, 2007, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: bears inscription verso: artist’s name, size and Papunya Tula Artists cat. YN0704115DIMENSIONS: 120.0 x 120.0 cmPROVENANCE: Painted at Alice Springs in 2007Papunya Tula Artists, Alice SpringsAP Bond Gallery, AdelaideThe Luczo Family Collection, USAESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Papunya Tula Artiststhat states: ‘This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Mukula, east of Jupiter Well in Western Australia. During mythological times a large group of ancestral women came from the west and stopped at this site to perform the ceremonies associated with the area. They later continued their travels towards the east passing through Ngaminya, Kiwirrkura and Wirrulnga on their way to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). As the women travelled they gathered a variety of bush foods including kampurarrpa berries (desert raisin) from the small shrub Solanum centrale, and pura (bush tomato) from the plant Solanum chippendalei. Kampurarrpa berries can be eaten directly from the plant but are sometimes ground into a paste and cooked on the coals as a type of damper, while pura are the size of an apricot, and after the seeds have been removed, can be stored for long periods by halving the fruit and skewering them onto a stick. The shapes in the painting represent the features of the country through which they travelled as well as the bush food they gathered.’

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