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Auction Description for The Auction at Graceland: The Auction at Graceland - October 29, 2016

The Auction at Graceland - October 29, 2016 (144 Lots)

by The Auction at Graceland


144 lots with images

29 October 2016

Live Auction

Memphis, TN, USA

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1953 Humes High School Yearbook Signed by Elvis Presley and Class President George Klein

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Description: Carolyn Lee Jones was certainly a popular girl in Humes High School and her yearbook from 1953 confirms the fact that this lovely lady had many friends and admirers. The most famous of those was Elvis Presley himself, who signed near his own class picture, "Best of luck to a very cute girl. Elvis." Elvis' friend and Class President, George Klein, also signed "To a very nice girl. Best of everything always. George." Based on the staggering number of signatures in her yearbook, it appears Carolyn knew almost everyone in her school! A cherished high school memento, this yearbook was stored for many years in a safety deposit box, and because of that it is one of the most well-preserved copies ever offered.The yearbook, signed by Carolyn Jones in blue ink on the inside cover, is 112 pages long. Elvis is depicted in his senior class portrait wearing a suit jacket and tie with a curl of hair falling onto his forehead. He has listed his major as "Shop, History, English" and his activities as "R.O.T.C., Biology Club, English Club, History Club, Speech Club." Elvis is also mentioned on page 30 in the class' Last Will and Testament, in Section 83: "Donald Williams, Raymond McCraig and Elvis Presley leave hoping there will be someone to take their places as 'teachers' pets.'" Elvis is also pictured on page 56, in the 5th period 12th grade English class photo, in the back row.The pristine example of the 1953 Herald yearbook measures approximately 11 by 8 inches (27.94 x 20.32 cm) and is offered with a letter from Carolyn Lee (Jones) Davis in which she fondly recalls her school days with Elvis:There are so many memories in this wonderful book. I think back on the days of Elvis sitting on the front steps of the school and playing his guitar. To see what he has become is truly amazing. He was always a loner and most people paid him no attention. I felt sorry for him at times. We became friends and I helped him with his school work. English was his worst subject. Funny how life takes its turns. I, for one, was very proud to know him. Memories are a wonderful thing.The yearbook is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The yearbook presents with few if any distresses, the Elvis signature is clean and bold and in exceptional near mint condition overall.

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1953 Humes High School

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Description: These class photos are very scarce as most students didn't order what would had been an expensive keepsake at the time. While  students couldn't resist the yearbook, since obtaining the signatures of friends was an important ritual, most students did not opt to purchase the costly class portrait composite photo. This portrait photo composite, by Jaffe Studios and dated 1953, features a young Elvis in the second row from the bottom and 11th from the left. Elvis' lifelong friend George Klein can be seen with the other class officers in the third row from the top, with his title of "President" displayed below his portrait. Other class composites have displayed a glossy finish, but the presented example has a matte finish not uncommon for the portrait photos of the period. The photo measures 11 by 14 inches (27.94 x 35.56 cm) and is presented in a frame measuring 18 by 21 inches (45.72 x 53.34 cm). This very rare relic of the famous Humes High School class portrait composite photo is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The photo has been very well preserved, exhibiting only minor distresses, including one small area of wrinkling near the top border and a few barely noticeable wrinkles along the bottom right. The contrast of the photo remains strong and has not suffered the fading usually associated with these artifacts. Excellent to Mint condition overall.

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1955 Elvis Presley Signed Early Promotional Photo

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Description: This early promotional photograph was created by Sun Records to promote its new star. Elvis is wearing a shirt, tie and jacket similar (if not the same) to the ones he is wearing in a well-known circa 1954 image that also includes Scotty Moore and Bill Black, who are both wearing Starlite Wranglers cowboy shirts. This same ensemble can also be seen in the image of Elvis, Bob Neal and Sam Phillips signing Elvis' management contract, with the presence of Neal leading one to assume this promotional photo was shot in that same late 1954/early 1955 time period. This early promotional shot of the fast-rising star was used in a plethora of newspapers and advertisements in 1955 and was kept on hand at performances. This was the time when Elvis was being described as one of the "biggest things in the business" and "good-looking as all heck" and this photo certainly confirms those assertions. This iconic image is signed on the reverse in the lower center quadrant "Sincerely Elvis Presley" with a big, bold signature, underlined twice, and salutation. The photo measures 10 by 8 inches (25.4 x 20.32 cm) and is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The photo has several creases and moderate crazing across the surface. The edges exhibit moderate to heavy wrinkles and some toning. The mild toning and few stains on the reverse do not affect the bold signature at all. Very Good condition.

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1953 W&W Invoice and Memphis Recording Service Accounting Statement for Recording Tape Possibly Used for Elvis Presley

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Description: Elvis walked into the offices of Sun in August of 1953 to record a song for his mother, and the receptionist, Marion Keisker, was the first to note the talent that would launch the career of this superstar. Offered is a 1953 invoice from W&W Distributing Company and a check register noting the payment of the invoice. The W&W invoice, dated 11-17-53 and numbered 32918, is for 12 1,200-foot rolls of MMM tape. Considering his habit of reusing tape reels, this invoice likely billed Sam Phillips for the tape that would be used in recording Elvis' very first sessions at Sun with Scotty and Bill in 1954. Noted with "M. Keisker" (probably for receiving the tape rolls), the invoice, sold to Memphis Recording Service, totals $43.67. The accounting statement for this invoice has handwritten annotations (likely made by Ms. Keisker or Sam Phillips) which include taking a 2% discount and indicating that this invoice was paid on 07 December 1953 with Memphis Recording Service check number 290. This invoice and accounting statement measure approximately 8 1/2 by 5 5/8 inches (21.59 x 14.28 cm) and 5 5/8 by 6 1/4 inches (14.28 x 15.87 cm) respectively and are accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The invoice has staple holes and minor foxing near the top edge, otherwise in excellent condition; the statement is in similar condition with an additional rust stain at the top center.

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Elvis Presley Owned and Worn Tiger's Eye, Diamond and Gold Ring Gifted to Bodyguard Sam Thompson in 1973

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Description: Elvis favored certain stones in his jewelry and tiger's eye was one such stone, perhaps because it is believed to bring harmony, balance and protection as well as enhance good luck. This 14-karat yellow gold men's ring has a central cushion-shaped tiger's eye stone measuring 11 x 7 mm which is surrounded by a rectangle of 31 diamonds with vertical beveled shoulders, each measuring 1.2 mm and weighing 0.01 carat. The ring, which measures size 10 1/4 and weighs a total of 16.5 grams, comes with a letter from Sam Thompson that states in part: "In March 1973, I was in Baptist Hospital in Memphis, recuperating from an injury received while serving as a deputy sheriff. Elvis sent Red West to my hospital room with a small check to 'help pay the bills' while I was off work. Later that month, Elvis came by my apartment and removed a ring from his finger and gave it to me, assuring me that all would be well. The ring is 14K yellow gold and has about 30 small diamonds, and a center stone of Tigers Eye, which I think was Elvis' favorite stone."Having been loyal to Elvis since 1972, Sam Thompson was the recipient of many gifts from Elvis over the years, which was a way in which Elvis showed his gratitude. The accompanying DVD interview with Sam Thompson features Sam speaking about several items available in this auction, including this very ring. The ring is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The ring shows only minor wear. Excellent condition.

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1970s Translucent Blue Glass Ashtray from Elvis Presley's Desk at Graceland

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Description: Many a small-tipped cigar was extinguished by Elvis in this very 1970s clear blue ashtray that sat upon his upstairs desk, just outside his bedroom. Gifted, surely on the spur of the moment, to Sam Thompson (as detailed in the accompanying LOA), the receptacle is a simple but personal artifact from within Graceland. The ashtray measures approximately 6 1/2 inches (16.51 cm) in width. Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The ashtray appears very clean with only a few very small chips along the inner edge, near mint condition overall.

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1970s Brass Decorative Figurines and Tray from Elvis Presley's Graceland Billiards Room

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Description: Brass tools and decorative items have been popular for centuries and as metalworking technology progressed, decorative brass items became more prevalent in home decor, especially in the 1970s, during which period brass was popular for fixtures and a plethora of decorations. Always being up to the minute with the latest trends and technology, Elvis followed that craze in his own personal space. The offered brass two-handled tray was adorned with a brass apple, gold fish, teddy bear and rocking horse and as Sam Thompson recalls in part in his letter that accompanies this grouping, "When Linda decorated the pool room downstairs at Graceland it included displayed brass items, as it currently does. The pictured brass bear, rocking horse, fish, apple and tray were once displayed in the downstairs pool room at Graceland." The tray measures 6 3/4 inches (17.14 cm) in length and 5 inches (12.7 cm) in width. This collection of decorative brass figures is offered with a letter from Sam Thompson and a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: All of the brass figurines and tray are in good, well-loved condition with no maker’s marks and some residue on the base of the bear. The apple is composed of a solid material and is heavier in weight in comparison to the other figurines.

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1977 Decorative Glass Animal Figurines from Elvis Presley's Graceland Dining Room

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Description: Glass animal figures have always been a popular collectible starting from the days of carnivals and the literary classic A Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams. Steuben Glass Works in Corning, New York, became a popular maker of these delicate creatures and as one might expect in a house with small children in the 1970s, household decor would not be complete without the presence of a few decorative glass animal figurines. The offered reclining sea otter, rabbit and elephant donned the shelves in the dining room at Graceland as Sam Thompson attests in his accompanying letters (one for each animal). Sam relays that each was given to him by Elvis' Aunt Delta after Elvis' death. The rabbit measures 3 inches (7.62 cm) in height and 4 inches (10.16 cm) in length, the elephant also measures 3 inches (7.62 cm) in height and 3 1/4 inches (8.25 cm) in length, and the reclining sea otter measures 1 3/4 inches (4.44 cm) in height and 4 inches (10.16 cm) in length. This Graceland glass menagerie is accompanied by three letters from Sam Thompson and a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: Although not confirmed made by Steuben, each of the animals is in excellent condition with no marks, nicks or scratches.

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Elvis Presley's Blue Geode Paperweight from His Desk at Graceland

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Description: Generous to a fault, all someone had to do was make an off-handed remark about liking or admiring something and Elvis was likely to immediately hand it over to them. It happened time and again over the years, and that's how Sam Thompson came to own this beautiful blue geode paperweight that once sat upon the desk outside Elvis' bedroom in Graceland. The geode interior is formed from millions of years of interplay between moisture, chemical elements and pressure to create a presentation unique to every sample. A stunning, and literally timeless, geologic personal artifact from Elvis. The geode measures approximately 4 by 7 inches (10.16 by 17.78 cm). Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The 7" wide 4" tall paperweight is in like-new condition, as expected for a geologic relic.

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Wooden Jewelry Box from Elvis' Upstairs Office at Graceland, 1977

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Description: This masculine jewelry box has a wooden base, fabric lining and a molded plastic lid with a two-dimensional raised image of two deer in a wooded landscape. The box has a sticker on the bottom that reads "Dante American Walnut Made in U.S.A." The jewelry box is accompanied by a letter from Sam Thompson which states, in part, "In 1977 while at Graceland and upstairs in Elvis' office, I admired a jewelry box that depicted a deer. I was a deer hunter at that time and I pretended to take the box and Elvis joked and said put down my jewelry box. We laughed and he then gave it to me as a gift. It has been in my possession since that day in 1977." The letter also contains an image of the box. With Elvis' passion for jewelry, one can only imagine the treasures this box once held. The box measures approximately 9 by 12 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches (22.86 x 31.75 x 6.35 cm). Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The box is in very good condition overall. The interior shows signs of heavy use with stains and accumulation on the interior lining. The lid is in good condition with one small black mark near the top center.

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1977 Small Silver-Plated Vases from Elvis Presley's Graceland Dining Room

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Description: The 1970s saw many unique trends in both fashion and design. Graceland was the height of style and luxurious design during that period. This pair of ornate, silver-plated, fluted vases with flowing flower design are lined with white ceramic and exhibit a hallmark similar to that of International Silver's 1970s hallmark of two lion heads flanking a crest under the base. The pair of vases adorned the grand dining room at Graceland and were likely on display in the china cabinet which contained much of the family's silver. In a letter from Sam Thompson that accompanies the vases, he describes in part, "Following Elvis' death in 1977, Elvis' Aunt Delta gave me a set of silver vases, each about 9" tall with white ceramic interiors. These vases had been in Graceland's dining room for many years and were given to me as a memento of my time there. They have continuously been in my possession since then." The vases measure 6 1/4 inches (15.87 cm) in height and are offered with a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The silver-plated vases are tarnished with a lovely patina from age and use. One white painted interior contains some surface cracking.

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1977 Silvered Jewelry Box from Elvis Presley's Private Dressing Area

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Description: Elvis' love for jewelry is well documented and he was as likely to give a piece to an admirer as he was to acquire more on a frequent basis, so it's no surprise that Elvis would store his collection in jewelry boxes in his personal dressing area. This simple yet elegant silver-plated jewelry box is lined with a dark blue velveteen, perfect for keeping masculine jeweled treasures. The jewelry box is described in part in an accompanying letter from Sam Thompson: "During the spring of 1977, while at Graceland, Elvis gave me a ring and then joked about not having a box to put it in. He then went into the private dressing area adjacent to his bathroom and emptied the contents of a small silver jewelry box and then presented me with the box. It was Elvis' personal jewelry box and it has remained in my possession since then." A priceless memento that once housed the king's treasures. The jewelry box measures 5 1/2 by 4 by 1 1/4 inches (13.97 x 10.16 x 3.17 cm) and is offered with a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The box is slightly tarnished but in overall excellent condition.

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Elvis Presley-Owned WWII German Army Bayonet Brought Back from the Army in Germany

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Description: Bayonets were knife or sword-like weapons that commonly attached to the muzzle of a musket or rifle and were typically used in close combat. During his Army service in the late 1950s, Elvis was stationed at the heart of World War II, so it's no surprise that he would come home with a relic from the war that changed the world. The souvenir he chose was a 1943 fze (Holler) German bayonet. This bayonet with scabbard and leather frog is marked on the blade with "5982 k" and "43 fze," and marked twice at the base below the Bakelite handle "4519." The scabbard is marked "5955" (although not matching, certainly close). This intrepid artifact comes with a letter from Sam Thompson which states in part, "While visiting at Graceland, I admired a German bayonet Elvis had on a rifle rack in his office. Elvis told me he had acquired it when he was stationed in Germany in the Army. He then picked it up and gave it to me." With ties to both his military service and the country in which he was stationed, it's no doubt that the bayonet was cherished by Elvis. The bayonet measures 15 1/4 inches (38.73 cm) in length, the blade measures 9 15/16 inches (25.24 cm) in length, the scabbard measures 10 1/2 inches (26.67 cm) in length and the leather frog measures 8 3/4 inches (22.22 cm) in length. This historic artifact is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The blade is heavily patinated with evidence of wear and use. The scabbard is also heavily patinated with some dents from age and use. All three are overall in used but excellent condition.

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1976 Playboy Tie Bar and Cufflinks from Elvis Presley's Personal Collection

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Description: In 1953, a revolutionary new men's adult lifestyle and entertainment magazine was created by Hugh Hefner in Chicago and was called Playboy. This new publication would play a vital role in the sexual revolution of the period, with the first Playboy Men's Clubs opening soon thereafter in the 1960s. The first issue of Playboy, released in December of 1953, famously included a nude centerfold of Marilyn Monroe, setting the tone for future issues and establishing the magazine's popularity. The original logo of the rabbit with tuxedo tie was intended to be frisky and playful, a symbol of the magazine's intent. The rabbit was chosen in part, of course, because they are well known for their frequent proclivity to reproduce.The offered tie bar and cufflinks with Playboy logo originally came from the personal collection of Elvis Presley as attested in the letter from Sam Thompson, which reads in part, "While at Graceland in late 1976, I noticed a box with a set of Playboy Bunny cufflinks and tie tack in Elvis' office outside his upstairs bedroom. When I mentioned them to Elvis, he said they had been a gift from Hugh Hefner and that he had stayed at the Playboy Mansion in Los Angeles and had also used the Playboy Bunny aircraft prior to acquiring the Lisa Marie. He then handed them to me and gave them to me as a gift." A converging of two iconic 1970s brands. The tie bar measures 3/4 by 1 1/2 inches (1.91 x 3.81 cm) and the cufflinks with toggle back each measure 5/8 by 3/4 inches (1.59 x 1.91 cm) and are accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The cufflinks show no discernible wear, while the tie bar shows signs of wear, including finish loss on the rabbit’s ears and face. Excellent to Mint condition overall.

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Elvis Presley Owned and Worn Ruby Lion Head Cufflinks Given to Bodyguard Sam Thompson

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Description: These regal, 14 karat yellow gold lion head cufflinks, each with a pair of ruby inset eyes which measure 2 mm each, make a gallant statement that was a typical choice for Elvis' fashion. Elvis appreciated the symbolism of the lion and often chose it as a theme for his adornments; most notably the lion pendant necklace that Elvis was captured wearing on many important occasions, including his meeting with President Nixon, his acceptance of the Jaycees Award, and Sonny West's wedding. This majestic pair of cufflinks, weighing 7.9 grams, come with a letter from Sam Thompson that states in part, "In the summer of 1974, while visiting at Graceland, Elvis gave my father, Sanford Thompson, a lion head ring. Later, at The Memphian Theater, after telling me of his gift to my father, he then gave me a lion head set of cufflinks, which he removed from the shirt he was wearing and handed directly to me. The cufflinks are 14K yellow gold, weigh approximately 15.4 grams, and each one has two 3 point rubies for eyes." It was certainly a grand gesture by the King of Rock 'n' Roll to remove his own "king of the jungle" cufflinks and gift them to Sam. The cufflinks, with toggle link back, measure 3/4 inch (1.90 cm) in height and are accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The cufflinks are in excellent condition overall.

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1976 Elvis Presley's Minneapolis, Minnesota MPLS Police Tie Bar

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Description: The offered gold-colored tie bar with alligator clip back and "MPLS" police badge center is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Sam Thompson in which he states, in part, "I was with Elvis backstage Oct. 17, 1976 at the Met Sports Arena in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Elvis mentioned to the policeman that he collected law enforcement memorabilia. The officer took off his tie tack and gave it to Elvis and Elvis gave him a scarf and an autograph. The tie clip says MPLS Police. This tie tack remained in Elvis' traveling badge case until the day he died. Vernon Presley gave me this tie tack after Elvis' death and it is now in the possession of Andreas Myrvold Jensen of Norway." The letter also depicts an image of this tie bar. The tie bar measures approximately 2 1/8 inches (5.39 cm) in length and is accompanied by color pictures of Elvis on stage that night in Minneapolis, a black-and-white photo of Elvis in Minneapolis in 1956 and a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The tie bar is in good condition overall with typical signs of wear and rubbing to metal expected with use and age.

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1976 Elvis Presley's Personal

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Description: Before the ill-fated racquetball club venture that was Presley's Center Courts ceased operations just a few months after launching in April 1976, these little beauties were printed and now remain among the few reminders of Elvis' foray into private business. "Chairman of the Board" is listed as the title for Elvis–only fitting–and the card is adorned with a gold-embossed "TCB" logo in the upper right and the Presley's Center Courts logo in the upper left. The debts piled up faster than the memberships of this new sporting concern, and the business ceased operations by mid-summer. A nice companion piece to any Elvis Presley racquetball artifact.  The accompanying DVD interview with Sam Thompson features Sam speaking about several items available in this auction, including this very business card.The card measures 2 1/2 by 3 inches (6.35 x 7.62 cm). Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The 2 1/2" x 3" business card with gold embossed "TCB" logo remains in Near Mint condition.

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Elvis Presley Poker Chips Used on His Plane the <em>Lisa Marie</em>

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Description: Elvis is synonymous with Las Vegas, the city of lights and of course gambling! It's therefore no surprise that the Lisa Marie, Elvis' personal airplane, would be equipped with plenty of poker chips. Offered are three packs of 100 colorful interlocking poker chips, one in original "Lucky" brand cardboard packaging and two in original "Pleasantime" brand amber-colored plastic holder boxes from the Lisa Marie. The poker chips are offered with a signed letter from Sam Thompson picturing these very chips that states in part, "I flew on the Lisa Marie, Elvis' personal aircraft, many times, and these poker chips were on that plane for Elvis' use. They have continuously been in my possession since 1977." Elvis certainly upped the stakes with these chips during his mile-high games. There are 297 poker chips in total, and the plastic cases measure approximately 3 1/4 by 6 1/4 (8.26 by 15.88 cm), while the cardboard box measures approximately 2 1/2 by 6 1/4 inches (6.35 by 15.88 cm). The poker chips are also accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The chips and packaging show normal signs of age, with some creases to the box and moderate toning to many of the white chips and the plastic containers. Overall EX condition.

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August 1974 Elvis Presley Stage-Worn Black Onyx and Gold Ring Given to Friend and Bodyguard Sam Thompson

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Description: During the 1970s, Elvis was not only known for his love of jewelry and wearing lots of it, he was also renowned for giving it away at the mere mention of admiration from friends, family and fans. Elvis was attracted to a variety of stones for their meanings or appeal, so given that black onyx is said to provide control and protection, absorbing negative energy, it's no surprise that this 14-karat yellow gold ring with a central round black onyx stone was worn by Elvis on stage. This handsome size 10 ring has stepped gold shoulders and large center stone of black onyx measuring 9 x 7 mm with a total weight of 9.1 grams. It is offered with several letters of provenance, including a letter from Sam Thompson, dated August 15, 1996, in which he states in part: Beginning August 14th of 1974, Elvis performed at the Showroom at the Hilton Hotel in Las Vegas for a two (2) week period. I was a guest of Elvis' and one night, after a performance and while upstairs in his suite, my late mother admired a yellow gold man's ring that he was wearing. Elvis immediately took off the ring and gave it to my mother to try on. When the ring proved too large for her hand, Elvis handed the ring to me. I tried it on and it fit and Elvis made a gift of the ring to me as a memento of my visit. The ring is yellow gold with a flat black onyx center and is now in the possession of Tom Salva.The ring comes in a polished wood presentation box with personalized plaque and is accompanied by an additional letter from Sam Thompson, dated August 18, 2006, in which Sam recounts the same story and further elaborates that Tom Salva acquired the ring from him in 1996, and in 2006, Sam once again confirmed the ring, now in the possession of Stephen Gates, as the very ring gifted to him by Elvis in 1974. A tribute to Elvis' generosity, this ring was cherished by several collectors over the years. The ring is also being sold with a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The ring shows signs of moderate to heavy use, with scuffs and a few small scratches on the band. Excellent condition.

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1971 Mathey-Tissot Custom-Made Watch with

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Description: Prior to the January 16, 1971 ceremony for the Jaycees "Ten Outstanding Young Men" award given to Elvis Presley, he had his Memphis jeweler, Harry Levitch, customize a number of watches as gifts for his closest friends and associates to commemorate the event. The Mathey-Tissot gold-toned watches had a special bezel added with four stars and "ELVIS PRESLEY" circling the face. Elvis was as proud of the Jaycees award as any he had ever been given during his career, and he went to great lengths to celebrate the event with those closest to him. These watches were his way of saying thanks for all the support during his career. The watches were also given to the other nine recipients of that year's Jaycees award.The handsome automatic watch is marked with the serial number "342596" on the back of the case along with "Stainless Steel Back Swiss Made Mathey-Tissot." The gold-toned dial with day and date window is attached to an adjustable gold-toned woven bracelet (likely added later). The offered example was presented to Roy Nixon, the then-sheriff of Memphis who, later, became mayor of Memphis. The wristwatch comes with a letter from Roy Nixon that states in part, "...I became friends with Elvis Presley. In fact, in 1970 I made him a special deputy, and later chief deputy, and deputized some of his group of guys so they could carry guns. Tehre [sic] is a picture in 1970 with myself and the guys displaying our badges. During this time, I received some gifts from Elvis. One such beautiful gift was a Mathey-Tissot watch." A December 28, 1970 receipt for the watches being ordered from Harry Levitch Jewelers resides in the Graceland Archives. These timepieces were produced in very limited numbers and are highly sought-after by advanced Elvis collectors. The watch face measures approximately 1 3/8 inches (3.493 cm) in diameter. Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.Please Note: Two numbers in the watch's serial number were transposed in our original description. The number in red, above, is now correct.

Condition Report: The watch is in well-loved condition as expected with use and age, with some wear to the gold-tone around the bezel, otherwise in Very Good condition overall.

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Elvis Presley's Las Vegas Hilton $1 Chip and Matchbook

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Description: Matchbooks have always been collectible, with people loving to amass examples from everywhere they have been. In December of 1976, Elvis was performing for two weeks in Vegas and according to a letter from entourage member Sam Thompson, during Elvis' time at the Las Vegas Hilton that month: "...Elvis decided to go downstairs to play blackjack. While he played, he kept a stack of $1 chips with a book of Hilton matches on top of them. When the crowd became too large to control, Elvis stood up to leave, paused to sign autographs, and handed me his last chip and the book of matches while he was doing so. I put them in my pocket and when we returned to the suite and I handed him the chip. [sic] He just laughed and told me to keep it as I would need it for gambling. The chip and book of matches have been in my possession since 1976." That time in Vegas would be Elvis' last, and this winning pair of mementos used by the king are an ideal token for any collection. The bright yellow matchbook with orange-and-blue Las Vegas Hilton logo measures 1 7/8 by 2 inches (4.76 x 5.08 cm) and the circular $1 gambling chip with Hilton logo has a diameter of 1 1/2 inches (3.81 cm). The chip and matchbook are accompanied by a letter from Sam Thompson and also by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The matchbook is in good condition with evidence of wear from use and wear along the edges. No matches have been removed. The chip is in well played condition.

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Rare Complete Set of Five Elvis Presley's Sun 78 RPM Records

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Description: This incredible complete collection of Elvis' Sun Records 78s includes his first five singles: 1954 Sun 209 "That's All Right/Blue Moon of Kentucky"; 1954 Sun 210 "Good Rockin' Tonight/I Don't Care if the Sun Don't Shine"; 1955 Sun 215 "Milkcow Blues Boogie/You're A Heartbreaker"; 1955 Sun 217 "Baby Let's Play House/I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone"; and 1955 Sun 223 "Mystery Train/I Forgot to Remember to Forget." While a complete set of Elvis' Sun 45s are highly collectible, a full set of the Sun 78s are even more rare and desirable. Rumors have been told throughout the years that the scarcity of the 78s was due to the fact that Sam Phillip's brother Tom, who ran the back warehouse where stacks of the 78s were stored, allowed an overseas collector into the space and that collector was so overtaken at the sheer quantity that he fell into the stacks, causing a vast amount of irreplaceable damage. Another anecdote explaining the shortage of 78s was that Tom Phillips would give away enormous quantities to county fairs who would use them as targets in the carnival games, hanging them from strings so customers could toss balls at them in an attempt to break them to smithereens.We may never know the true story, but the fact remains that the Elvis Sun 78s are highly sought after for their rarity and superior sound quality compared to the 45s. The 78 RPM records measure 10 inches (25.4 cm) in diameter. The set is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: A very presentable mid-grade complete set, with signs of moderate use, including a few scratches and scuffs. Labels are clean and intact. Very Good to Excellent condition, if not a little better overall.

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1954 Sun Records 209 Unplayed

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Description: Argued by Rolling Stone magazine to be the first rock n' roll record, Elvis' "That's All Right" was recorded in July of 1954 and released later that month by Sun Records as catalog number 209 with "Blue Moon of Kentucky" on side B. "That's All Right" is listed at #113 in Rolling Stone's "500 Greatest Songs of All Time." On that July day in 1954, Elvis was in Sun Studios with Scotty Moore and Bill Black recording, and during a break, they started playing an upbeat version of Arthur Crudup's "That's All Right." Sam Philips heard this rockin' rendition and had them start again so he could record it. Sam almost immediately sent it to local disc jockey Dewey Phillips at WHBQ. After playing it the first time, Dewey received numerous requests and ended up playing the song 14 times that day, and calling Elvis to the station for an on-air interview that very night. Offered is an unplayed 45 single of Sun Records 209 "That's All Right" with its original brown paper sleeve, Sun Records paper logo sleeve, and a letter from Cecil Scaife, first-ever promotion manager at Sun Records, confirming the unplayed condition of this original Sun 45. The letter, dated December 13, 2006, states in part, "This record you now own is from my personal collection and has been in my possession since it came from the pressing plant." It continues, "This is among a very limited number of records existing that is actually from the first promo pressing that Elvis and I used while he was touring the circuit." This rare example includes the three pressing disc marks and is accompanied by a reprint of an early 8 x 10-inch photo depicting what appears to be Sam Phillips showing Elvis some tricks on the guitar. This incredible piece of history would be more than "All Right" in any collection. The original single is offered with a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The 45 is in unused, unplayed condition with “U-128-45 72” marked on side A and “4-129-45 72” marked on side B. The Sun Records sleeve has ever-so-slight wear and browning to the edges from age.

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1955 Sun Records 223 Unplayed

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Description: Considered to be the recording that gained Elvis recognition as a country music star, "Mystery Train" was ranked #77 on Rolling Stone magazine's "500 Greatest Songs of All Time." The 45 single of "Mystery Train" was released in August of 1955 by Sun Records with "I Forgot to Remember to Forget" on side B. This unplayed single, cataloged as Sun Records 223, comes with its original brown paper sleeve, Sun Records paper logo sleeve and a letter from Cecil Scaife, first-ever promotion manager at Sun Records, confirming the unplayed condition of this original Sun 45. The letter, dated December 13, 2006 and signed 1-12-07, states in part, "This record you now own is from my personal collection and has been in my possession since it came from the pressing plant." It continues, "The record, 'Mystery Train', catalogue number 223, is in the original brown promotional sleeve and the record has never been played." This treasured piece of history includes a reprint of an early 8 x 10-inch photo depicting what appears to be Sam Phillips showing Elvis some tricks on the guitar, along with a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The unplayed record is excellent condition with “45-U-156x 20” on side A and “45-U-157x 20” marked on side B. The original Sun Records paper logo sleeve has some creases and staple holes along the edge.

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Original 1954 Record Stamper for Sun Records 209, Elvis Presley's

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Description: From a New York State CollectionCLICK HERE to read more about this collection which includes The Record Stampers for Sun 209 and a group of Sun Record Co. Checks - LOTS 25–30.What is a record "stamper"?The simplest explanation is that these are the actual "plates" that were used to produce the records in the factory. In a bit more detail, the stamper is the culmination of a process that starts with a song's acetate, or master disk, that is created after recording. Acetates have an aluminum core that is coated with vinyl. The core makes acetates more rigid and heavy, but at a glance, they appear to look like a normal record. The acetate is then coated, or "plated," with silver and nickel, and this plate is in turn separated from the acetate. The resulting plate is called the "father" or "master plate." The original acetate gets destroyed in this process. The father is then plated again, creating a metal version of the original acetate. This "mother" plate is an exact copy of the acetate, and can be played to confirm quality. From this mother plate, another plate is created that becomes the stamper, while the mother is put aside for making future stampers. Stampers would normally only be good for creating a relatively small number of records, perhaps several thousand depending on the production plant's procedures. When the stampers wear out, a number of others can be made from the mother plate, and when the mother wears out, the whole process starts over again from a new master acetate.That the offered stampers were saved at all is a stroke of luck, to be sure. After their tenure in the record plant, they would have been returned to Sun, but they had no functional use, and would have been filed away, if not discarded. There are many stories of record collectors stumbling upon stampers strewn among stacks of old, unsold stock years later, but generally no one gave them much thought. The offered artifacts would be considered incredibly rare, if not terribly important, even if they were just any old songs from a source as important as Sun Records. But because of the fact that they are responsible for pressing what many consider to be the first record in rock and roll history, their significance to music history cannot be overstated.YOU ARE BIDDING ON: Original 1954 Record Stamper for Sun Records 209, Elvis Presley's "That's All Right"The offered metal stampers were used to produce some of the very earliest pressings of Elvis Presley's first 45 RPM record release with the songs "That's All Right" and "Blue Moon of Kentucky." The recording of these two songs is widely considered by many to be the birth of rock and roll. When Elvis exploded on the Memphis airwaves, changing popular music forever, Sam Phillips charged into the future and had his records on the shelves only days later, on July 19, 1954. The initial copies were pressed by Plastic Products in Memphis, and Elvis himself is said to have visited the plant to watch the record being made. There is no way to know for sure if these stampers were part of the initial production run in mid-July, but pencil notations on the storage sleeve indicate that they were in use no later than August 1954. Either way, some of the first records Elvis fans ever played were pressed from these very stampers. They pressed together upon the waiting "hot wax" and, one copy after another, helped change the world forever.Key attributes of the stampers include the matrix numbers visible in what would be the "dead wax" portion of the final pressed records, the "Audiodisc" logo around the center circles, and, of course, the three small indentations around the center holes. The matrix numbers, which read, in reverse, "U-128-45" on "That's All Right" and "U-129-45" on "Blue Moon of Kentucky," match exactly to the matrix numbers which appear on the period copies of Sun 209. Both numbers are also followed by "72" a short distance away. (See photos presented above.)The three 1/4" indentations, used to hold the stampers in place by connecting with three opposing pins during pressing, are what created what are known to collectors of early Elvis records as "delta" marks. They form a triangle (or the Greek letter "delta") of marks on the Sun labels. These marks are the tell-tale sign that a record is a "delta pressing," pressed at the Memphis record plant. Copies pressed at other plants in Philadelphia or Los Angeles do not have these marks. The marks appear on all of Elvis' Sun 45s except for his final release, "Mystery Train." By the time of that release in 1955, the stamper production method had been adjusted.The original paper sleeve in which the stampers were stored, which is included with THIS LOT, the "That's All Right" stamper, has handwritten pencil notations on one side, including "Sun 209" and "45-U-128," which is a slightly transposed version of the final record's side A matrix number, U-128-45. Most interesting, though, are what appear to be notations of nine different pressings of the record between August 1954 and November 1955, with the earliest listed as August 27, 1954, mere weeks after the record's release. The complete list reads as follows, with indecipherable entries listed with (?):8/27/54 - 40010/26/54 - 3001/31/55 - 2506(?)/28/55 - 1008/(?)/55 - 1009/(?)/55 - 15010/13/55 - 10011/3/55 - 15011/25/55 - 200It is certainly possible that the stampers were employed prior to the first date that was written on the sleeve, but there is no way to tell for sure. Additionally, the final date is interesting, because it likely represents the very last copies of Sun 209 to be pressed. Just four days earlier, on November 21, 1955, Sam Phillips had sold Elvis' contract to RCA. The deal stipulated that Sam was to turn over all recordings of Elvis and stop all sales and distribution of his records by the end of the year. In fact, RCA started selling their own pressings of Elvis' Sun singles only weeks after the signing, but not before the offered stampers made one last run at pressing just a little more history.At this writing, only one other stamper for "That's All Right" has ever been seen offered publicly, and that copy was discovered together with a stamper for "Mystery Train" in the late 1960s. These are held in a private collection in England. To our knowledge, no stamper for "Blue Moon of Kentucky" has ever surfaced, and the one offered here may be the only one in existence. Furthermore, that the stampers offered here, for both sides of Sun 209, were discovered stored together in the same sleeve with notated pressing dates and quantities from the first few weeks of distribution is an indication that they are in a special category all to themselves. A truly remarkable and undeniably historic offering. Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.YOU ARE BIDDING ON: Original 1954 Record Stamper for Sun Records 209, Elvis Presley's "That's All Right"

Condition Report: The stamper shows expected signs of wear and use. Excellent condition.

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Original 1954 Record Stamper for Sun Records 209, Elvis Presley's

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Description: From a New York State CollectionCLICK HERE to read more about this collection which includes The Record Stampers for Sun 209 and a group of Sun Record Co. Checks - LOTS 25–30.What is a record "stamper"?The simplest explanation is that these are the actual "plates" that were used to produce the records in the factory. In a bit more detail, the stamper is the culmination of a process that starts with a song's acetate, or master disk, that is created after recording. Acetates have an aluminum core that is coated with vinyl. The core makes acetates more rigid and heavy, but at a glance, they appear to look like a normal record. The acetate is then coated, or "plated," with silver and nickel, and this plate is in turn separated from the acetate. The resulting plate is called the "father" or "master plate." The original acetate gets destroyed in this process. The father is then plated again, creating a metal version of the original acetate. This "mother" plate is an exact copy of the acetate, and can be played to confirm quality. From this mother plate, another plate is created that becomes the stamper, while the mother is put aside for making future stampers. Stampers would normally only be good for creating a relatively small number of records, perhaps several thousand depending on the production plant's procedures. When the stampers wear out, a number of others can be made from the mother plate, and when the mother wears out, the whole process starts over again from a new master acetate.That the offered stampers were saved at all is a stroke of luck, to be sure. After their tenure in the record plant, they would have been returned to Sun, but they had no functional use, and would have been filed away, if not discarded. There are many stories of record collectors stumbling upon stampers strewn among stacks of old, unsold stock years later, but generally no one gave them much thought. The offered artifacts would be considered incredibly rare, if not terribly important, even if they were just any old songs from a source as important as Sun Records. But because of the fact that they are responsible for pressing what many consider to be the first record in rock and roll history, their significance to music history cannot be overstated.YOU ARE BIDDING ON: Original 1954 Record Stamper for Sun Records 209, Elvis Presley's "Blue Moon of Kentucky"The offered metal stampers were used to produce some of the very earliest pressings of Elvis Presley's first 45 RPM record release with the songs "That's All Right" and "Blue Moon of Kentucky." The recording of these two songs is widely considered by many to be the birth of rock and roll. When Elvis exploded on the Memphis airwaves, changing popular music forever, Sam Phillips charged into the future and had his records on the shelves only days later, on July 19, 1954. The initial copies were pressed by Plastic Products in Memphis, and Elvis himself is said to have visited the plant to watch the record being made. There is no way to know for sure if these stampers were part of the initial production run in mid-July, but pencil notations on the storage sleeve indicate that they were in use no later than August 1954. Either way, some of the first records Elvis fans ever played were pressed from these very stampers. They pressed together upon the waiting "hot wax" and, one copy after another, helped change the world forever.Key attributes of the stampers include the matrix numbers visible in what would be the "dead wax" portion of the final pressed records, the "Audiodisc" logo around the center circles, and, of course, the three small indentations around the center holes. The matrix numbers, which read, in reverse, "U-128-45" on "That's All Right" and "U-129-45" on "Blue Moon of Kentucky," match exactly to the matrix numbers which appear on the period copies of Sun 209. Both numbers are also followed by "72" a short distance away. (See photos presented above.)The three 1/4" indentations, used to hold the stampers in place by connecting with three opposing pins during pressing, are what created what are known to collectors of early Elvis records as "delta" marks. They form a triangle (or the Greek letter "delta") of marks on the Sun labels. These marks are the tell-tale sign that a record is a "delta pressing," pressed at the Memphis record plant. Copies pressed at other plants in Philadelphia or Los Angeles do not have these marks. The marks appear on all of Elvis' Sun 45s except for his final release, "Mystery Train." By the time of that release in 1955, the stamper production method had been adjusted.The original paper sleeve in which the stampers were stored, which is NOT INCLUDED with this lot, but is included with the previous lot, #25, the "That's All Right" stamper, has handwritten pencil notations on one side, including "Sun 209" and "45-U-128," which is a slightly transposed version of the final record's side A matrix number, U-128-45. Most interesting, though, are what appear to be notations of nine different pressings of the record between August 1954 and November 1955, with the earliest listed as August 27, 1954, mere weeks after the record's release. The complete list reads as follows, with indecipherable entries listed with (?):8/27/54 - 40010/26/54 - 3001/31/55 - 2506(?)/28/55 - 1008/(?)/55 - 1009/(?)/55 - 15010/13/55 - 10011/3/55 - 15011/25/55 - 200It is certainly possible that the stampers were employed prior to the first date that was written on the sleeve, but there is no way to tell for sure. Additionally, the final date is interesting, because it likely represents the very last copies of Sun 209 to be pressed. Just four days earlier, on November 21, 1955, Sam Phillips had sold Elvis' contract to RCA. The deal stipulated that Sam was to turn over all recordings of Elvis and stop all sales and distribution of his records by the end of the year. In fact, RCA started selling their own pressings of Elvis' Sun singles only weeks after the signing, but not before the offered stampers made one last run at pressing just a little more history.At this writing, only one other stamper for "That's All Right" has ever been seen offered publicly, and that copy was discovered together with a stamper for "Mystery Train" in the late 1960s. These are held in a private collection in England. To our knowledge, no stamper for "Blue Moon of Kentucky" has ever surfaced, and the one offered here may be the only one in existence. Furthermore, that the stampers offered here, for both sides of Sun 209, were discovered stored together in the same sleeve with notated pressing dates and quantities from the first few weeks of distribution is an indication that they are in a special category all to themselves. A truly remarkable and undeniably historic offering. Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.Please Note: Also included with this lot is the original paper storage sleeve, with period pencil notations which read "Sun 209" and "U-129-45."YOU ARE BIDDING ON: Original 1954 Record Stamper for Sun Records 209, Elvis Presley's "Blue Moon of Kentucky"

Condition Report: The stamper shows expected signs of wear and use. Excellent condition.

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Set of Three Sun Record Co. Checks Written to Elvis Presley, Scotty Moore and Bill Black for November 15, 1954 Recording Session for

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Description: From a New York State CollectionCLICK HERE to read more about this collection which includes The Record Stampers for Sun 209 and a group of Sun Record Co. Checks - LOTS 25–30.This grouping of checks is an unprecedented offering representing the actual payments for an Elvis Presley recording session at The Memphis Recording Service with Sam Phillips. The three Sun Record Co., Inc. checks are each signed by Phillips and, respectively, Elvis Presley, Scotty Moore and Bill Black. They are for the recording session on November 15, 1954 for the song "I'm Left, You're Right, My Baby's Gone." The memos on the Moore and Black checks (nos. 834 and 835, respectively) read "Presley Session: 11/15/54," while Elvis' check (no. 833) simply reads "Session: 11/15/54." The distinction between the memos may be related to the fact that Elvis was paid as the session leader, while Scotty and Bill, as players, were paid half as much. The checks are dated the day after the session, November 16, 1954 and are also endorsed on the reverse below each musician's name by "O.V. Foster," the secretary of the Memphis local musicians' union.Seven takes were recorded at the session, and are commonly referred to as the "slow" version of the song. Eventually, the boys would record the more upbeat version that was released with "Baby Let's Play House" as Sun 217 and titled "I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone." However, there is some confusion about whether the record version was recorded during the March 5, 1955 session, as is commonly held, or if it was indeed recorded during the November 15, 1954, session. The debate has smoldered among fans for some time, and hopefully the offering of these checks will only fan the flames!Elvis Presley signed checks of any vintage are highly sought-after by collectors, and checks from the earliest period of his career only more so. And an Elvis-signed Sun Record Co. check that is also signed by Sam Phillips would be the pinnacle. So considering the presented group of Sun Record checks are signed by not only Elvis and Sam, but also Scotty Moore and Bill Black, and that they are for a recording session, it is fair to say that this may be the most significant Elvis Presley check offering ever. A truly historic auction opportunity. Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The checks show normal signs of wear including bank stampings and cancellation punch holes. They have been very well preserved. Excellent to Mint condition.

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Sun Record Co. Check to Dewey Phillips for $500 (10/5/56) Signed by Sam Phillips and Dewey Phillips

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Description: From a New York State CollectionCLICK HERE to read more about this collection which includes The Record Stampers for Sun 209 and a group of Sun Record Co. Checks - LOTS 25–30.Dewey Phillips was a key player in the legendary launch of the career of Elvis Presley and the seismic shift in the landscape of popular American music that followed. It was Dewey who couldn't stop playing the still-warm copies of "That's All Right" that Sam Phillips handed to him that fateful night in July of 1954. And it was Dewey, after the studio phone blew up with kids clamoring to hear the song again and again, who got the young singer in the studio for a quick interview, in which he made sure to ask him what high school he had attended to let his fans know his race. Dewey was also one of the few people close to Sam Phillips, whom Sam socialized with on a regular basis. They could often be seen together after hours around Memphis, knocking back some refreshments or getting a late meal and letting their hair down.The offered Sun Record Co., Inc. check no. 1918 for $500 written to Dewey Phillips on October 5, 1956 is signed on the front by Sam Phillips and on the reverse by Dewey. It represents an unprecedented opportunity to acquire two of the most sought-after signatures from the era, from the two men responsible for lighting the match that became a wildfire. And on a Sun Records check, no less–it couldn't be a more fitting canvas. Dewey Phillips' tragic decline in the years that followed led to his death in 1968 at the age of only 42, making his signature incredibly rare. As to what the sizeable payment was for, let the conspiracy theories begin! As close as Sam and Dewey were as friends, it's not very likely that a payola check was necessary, but the notion is enticing! Regardless of the circumstances, we are fortunate to be left with an artifact that captures the signatures of two seminal figures in the history of rock 'n' roll. Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The check is very clean with few distresses, the expected cancellation holes and stampings notwithstanding. Near Mint condition.

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Sun Record Co. Check Written to and Signed by Legendary Blues Producer Lester Melrose Covering Earned Royalties for Elvis Presley's Recording of

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Description: From a New York State CollectionCLICK HERE to read more about this collection which includes The Record Stampers for Sun 209 and a group of Sun Record Co. Checks - LOTS 25–30.Lester Melrose is considered one of the most important men in music history because of his contributions in creating what became known as the "Chicago Blues" prior to World War II. He was one of the first producers of blues records, and as producer assigned most of the composer credits to himself while only paying his musicians for their time, an unfortunate and all too-commonplace practice in the record industry of the 20th century. The result was that Melrose, who couldn't play a lick, held the copyright to thousands of songs, including the Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup composition "That's All Right." Crudup did share in royalties for the song, eventually, but the offered Sun Record Co., Inc. check no. 1131, written on May 20, 1955, pays Lester Melrose $184.44 for "full payment of Promissory Note dated March 5, 1955, covering earned royalties on THAT'S ALL RIGHT." The check is signed by Marion K. MacInnes, who is, of course, Marion Keisker, the very woman who was present the day in 1953 that a young singer named Elvis Presley walked into the Memphis Recording Service and recorded his first song. Fitting that she should be the one to sign this particular Sun Record check. Lester Melrose has signed on the reverse. This amazing artifact brings together one of history's most legendary blues producers and a seminally important figure in the birth of rock 'n' roll. Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The check shows normal signs of wear including bank stampings and cancellation punch holes. It has been very well preserved. Near Mint condition.

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Sun Record Co. Check Written to Douglas Poindexter on November 16, 1954 - Also Signed by Sam Phillips

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Description: From a New York State CollectionCLICK HERE to read more about this collection which includes The Record Stampers for Sun 209 and a group of Sun Record Co. Checks - LOTS 25–30.Doug Poindexter had a fleeting musical career that just happened to coincide with the very birth of rock 'n' roll. "Doug Poindexter and the Starlight Wranglers" was a promising hillbilly band in 1953 and 1954, whose members included Scotty Moore and Bill Black. After being signed to Sun Records, Doug and his Wranglers recorded two of their hillbilly numbers in May of 1954, and some have credited these upbeat, somewhat rockabilly sessions with informing the style that Scotty Moore would, only weeks later, bring to the seminal recording of "That's All Right" with Elvis Presley and Bill Black. Poindexter would leave the music industry by the end of 1954, but prior to that, Elvis played a number of shows with the Wranglers at local Memphis clubs. It is quite possible, as some have speculated, that Poindexter also sat in on a number of Elvis recording sessions at Sun during that period. That idea makes the offered Sun Record Co., Inc. check for $8.00 written to "Douglas Poindexter" on November 16, 1954, and signed by Sam Phillips, all the more interesting. There is no memo referencing that the payment was for a session, but the check (no. 836) is the very next one in sequence after the three checks written to Elvis, Scotty and Bill on the very same day for the November 15th session during which they recorded "I'm Left, You're Right, My Baby's Gone." Those three checks are being offered as another lot in this auction. Did Poindexter sit in on the session, or perhaps just help with the arrangement? Did Sam leave off the memo because Poindexter had already left the musician's union and was technically on his way into the insurance business? We may never know, but Sam Phillips was compensating him for something on that very day, and most likely handing Doug this check at the same time he was handing Elvis, Scotty and Bill their checks. Regardless, the offered artifact presents the juxtaposed signatures of one of the most important figures in rock 'n' roll history and, perhaps, one of the most obscure. Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The check shows normal signs of wear including bank stampings and cancellation punch holes. It has been very well preserved. Near Mint condition.

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1954 Sun Records Credit Memo Listing Sun 209

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Description: Offered is the pink copy of a Sun Records credit memo issued to Bronzeville Record Distributing Company in Chicago, Illinois. The standard Sun Records "invoice" has been struck out to make this copy a merchandise credit slip. Credit memo #368, dated 11/10/54, lists 15 different Sun record numbers in the far left column and the quantity of each that was returned on November 4, 1954. With a total of 1,120 records returned at 40 cents each, Bronzeville Record Distributing Company had a merchandise credit of $448. Included in the list of returned records were two from The Prisonaires and Sun record number 209, "That's All Right/Blue Moon of Kentucky," which was the first of five Elvis singles to be released by Sun Records, where he recorded 24 songs between 1953 and 1955. The credit memo is offered with an original copy of the Sun record number 209 in period sleeve and a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The receipt has vertical and horizontal fold creases, fold line at upper right corner, areas of paper loss to left edge, minor tear near center tight side, tiny hole near upper left corner and reverse has an ink mark, otherwise in excellent condition overall. The record is in used and loved condition showing signs of having been played frequently.

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Carl Perkins Signed Original Sun 45 RPM

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Description: In October 1954, Carl Perkins began recording with Sun Studios and on January 1, 1956 released the smash hit "Blue Suede Shoes," which reached number 1 on the Billboard country music chart and topped at number 2 on Billboard's pop chart. It was Carl Perkins and the popularity of this song that launched Sun Records into the national spotlight. Carl became well known for his rockabilly sound and is recognized as one of the founding fathers of rock 'n' roll along with Elvis Presley, with whom he was friends. On January 30th of that same year Elvis recorded "Blue Suede Shoes," but didn't release his version while Carl Perkins' was still topping the charts. On March 17th however, Elvis sang "Blue Suede Shoes" and "Heartbreak Hotel" to a national audience on the Dorsey Brothers' Stage Show in New York. Following the chart-topping hit, Sam Phillips gave Carl a new Cadillac as a reward for being the first Sun artist to sell a million copies. Later that year, on December 4, 1956, Carl Perkins and Elvis, along with Jerry Lee Lewis and Johnny Cash, got together for an impromptu jam session at Sun Records that became famously known as the Million Dollar Quartet. Offered is the single release for Carl Perkins' famous "Blue Suede Shoes" with "Honey Don't" (later recorded by The Beatles) on the reverse side. The 45 RPM record is signed "To Joel / Carl Perkins" on side 1 of Sun Records 234. The 7-inch diameter record is offered in its original Sun Records sleeve. The autographed single is being sold with a framed original Sun Record Company invoice, dated 4/21/56 for the purchase of 300 copies of Sun 234 to Music City Record Distributors in Nashville, Tennessee. The purchased was shipped by bus on April 12 with the 300 copies costing a total of $123.00. The invoice is in a framed display with a plaque that states, "Sun Record Company / Original Carbon Invoice #4499 / From April 21st, 1956." An incredible pairing from one of the most popular songs in rock 'n' roll history. The invoice measures 6 3/4 by 8 inches (17.14 x 20.32), the framed display measures 25 by 19 inches (63.4 x 48.26 cm) and both the record and invoice are accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The 45 has been well loved with signs of heavy use with scratches and scuffs on the vinyl. The labels on both sides are intact and present with bold colors. VG-EX condition.

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1956 Sun Records 242

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Description: In 1956, Roy Orbison began recording at Sun Studios with his band The Teen Kings. Their first recording on this label was "Ooby Dooby," which did well nationwide, becoming a hit in 1956, selling approximately 200,000 copies and reaching number 59 on the Billboard Hot 100 list. Shortly after the release, the band went their separate ways and Roy remained with Sun Records as a solo artist until 1958. Offered is a 78 RPM of Sun Records 242, "Ooby Dooby," signed by Roy Orbison in black marker on the label, with "Go! Go! Go!" on side B. This exceptional example measures approximately 10 inches (25.4 cm) in diameter and is accompanied by a brown paper sleeve and a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The 78 has faint scratching on the surface typical of age, otherwise in excellent condition with strong signature. The sleeve has a tear at the bottom at the crease.

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1958 Johnny Cash Signed Sheet Music for

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Description: Johnny Cash had a style and sound all his own for which he became recognized and renowned. Offered is signed sheet music for "The Ways of a Woman in Love" by this iconic singer. "The Ways of a Woman in Love" reached number two on the country charts and the sheet music is accompanied by a Sun Records 45 single (Sun 302) with "You're the Nearest Thing to Heaven" on side B. The sheet music is signed on the front in black ink "Best Wishes Johnny Cash" and the 45 is in its original Sun Records paper sleeve. This visual combo with strong signature will make an ideal display and tribute to the "Man in Black," especially offered with the glossy reprint of an original 8 x 10 Sun Records Johnny Cash promotional photograph and two black-and-white reprints of Johnny Cash and his guitar. The sheet music measures approximately 12 by 9 inches (30.48 x 22.86 cm) and is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The sheet music has wear along the edges and a diagonal crease along the lower left; the 45 and original sleeve are in excellent condition overall.

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1958 Sun Records Invoice for 25 Copies of Sun 283 Johnny Cash's

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Description: In December of 1957, seven months prior to Johnny Cash leaving Sun Records for Columbia Records, his single "Ballad of a Teenage Queen" with "Big River" on side B was released. Offered is the original Sun Records invoice number 8124, dated 12-14-59, listing 25 copies each of four different Extended Play records as well as 25 copies of Sun 283 "Ballad of A Teenage Queen" that were shipped to Eric Dist. Co. in San Francisco on 12-11-59. The invoice totals $73.50 and is offered along with a very near mint (and possibly unplayed) copy of Sun 283, an original brown paper sleeve, original Sun Records 45 sleeve, and a glossy reprint of an original 8 x 10 Sun Records Johnny Cash promotional photograph and two black-and-white reprints of Johnny Cash and his guitar. "Ballad of a Teenage Queen" hit number one in the country charts and along with the invoice is ready to become number one again in any collection. The invoice measures approximately 7 1/4 by 8 1/4 inches (18.41 x 20.95 cm) and is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The invoice is in excellent condition with possible period ink stains on right middle edge and the 45 has minor wear to center of the label.

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Trio of June Carter and Johnny Cash Signed Documents

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Description: June Carter was a talented entertainer and accomplished musician well before her famous marriage to Johnny Cash. Born Valerie June Carter on June 23, 1929, she was better known by her stage name of June Carter, and later June Carter Cash after her marriage to Johnny Cash. Offered is June Carter's 1966 Tennessee driver's license listing her given name of Valerie J. Carter. The heavy stock paper license was issued on 5-3-1966 with an expiration date of her birthday on 6-23-1967 and is folded on the intended center line. The license is signed in blue ink "Valerie J. Carter" and has been hand cut along the edges. Also included in this incredible trio is a carbon copy document relating to John R. Cash's new passport stating his date of birth, state of birth, height, hair and eye color, passport issue and expiry dates (2/21/1973 and 2/20/1978 respectively) and a handwritten note (in unconfirmed hand) stating "D2092337 John's New Passport #"; and a handwritten receipt for a guitar case and an auto harp case "Received of June Carter" and signed by an E.J. Carter, totaling $100. A curious collection of ephemera relating to an adored couple in the entertainment industry. The fully extended license measures approximately 2 1/2 by 7 inches (6.35 x 17.78 cm), the passport receipt measures approximately 3 by 5 inches (7.62 x 12.7 cm), and the handwritten receipt measures approximately 7 3/4 by 5 3/4 inches (19.68 x 14.60 cm). The trio is accompanied by a glossy reprint of an original 8 x 10-inch Sun Records Johnny Cash promotional photograph and a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The documents are in excellent condition overall with typical signs of wear from age.

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1962 Sun Records Invoice for 650 Copies of Sun 376 Johnny Cash's

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Description: Beginning in late 1954, Johnny Cash recorded with Sun Records in the Sun Recording Studio in Memphis, and that continued until his move to Columbia Records in mid-1958. Sun Records continued to release recordings by Cash until 1964 from the material amassed during Cash's time at Sun. One such single, released in April 1962, was "Blue Train" with "Born to Lose" on side B. Offered is an original Sun Records invoice, dated 6-18-62, which lists 650 copies of Sun 376 "Blue Train" that were picked up on June 4, 1962, from the Monarch pressing plant in Los Angeles by Record Merchandising. The invoice, number 12986 with typed total cost of $230, is being offered with a very near mint (and possibly unplayed) copy of Sun 376 in its original brown paper sleeve, an original Sun Records 45 sleeve, and a glossy reprint of an original 8 x 10-inch Sun Records Johnny Cash promotional photograph. The invoice measures approximately 7 1/4 by 8 1/4 inches (18.41 x 20.95 cm) and is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated. This ensemble and tribute to Johnny Cash's Sun Records days is complete and ready for framing!

Condition Report: The invoice and record are in excellent condition.

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1955 Elvis Presley Signed Black-and-White Sun Records Promo Glossy Photo

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Description: Early in Elvis' budding career, his manager, Bob Neal, hired well-known Memphis photographer William Speer to take some publicity shots of Elvis that could be used by Sun Records to promote the fledgling star. A novice Elvis came to Speer's studio for the photo shoot and Speer stopped after just a number of photos since Elvis had not brought a change of clothes with him. Speer's wife suggested that Elvis simply remove his shirt for a few more. The shy young man agreed and Speer was able to shoot 11 different images in total, which are today some of the most well-known images of the king. The offered image is not only one of those 11 different images taken at the shoot that day, but one of the most widely used by Sun Records to publicize its new talent. This example has a bold blue "Thanks Elvis Presley" signature in the lower center on the reverse. The photo measures 10 by 8 inches (25.4 x 20.32 cm) and is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The photo and signature are in excellent condition overall. The photo contains a tiny pinhole near the upper right corner and a slight crease near the upper left corner, with small areas of discoloration on the reverse and very minor surface abrasions from age.

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1955 Earliest Known Elvis Presley Press Release from both Colonel Parker and Bob Neal - In Beautiful Framed Display

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Description: The framed display features the earliest known press release for Elvis Presley on Jamboree Attractions letterhead. This press release template lists Bob Neal as Personal Management and describes Elvis as "the 20-year old fireball from the Louisiana Hayride." This release was issued when Elvis was still on the Sun record label. It is framed with several pictures of Elvis, including Elvis and Colonel Tom Parker, Bob Neal and Sam Phillips, and a plaque that states: Elvis Presley's 1955 Earliest Known Press Release. Colonel Tom Parker, then manager for Hank Snow and a partner in Jamboree Attractions, ran into the Memphis Flash, Elvis Presley, on January 15, 1955. The Colonel saw his future meal ticket and promised his partner, Snow, that they would land this new sensation. However, by year's end, Col. Parker had removed Snow from the picture, forged a new partnership with Bob Neal, then Elvis' manager, which lasted less than six months. And on November 21, 1955 Col. Tom Parker would be in sole control of America's soon-to-be-biggest entertainment icon. This incredibly rare Jamboree Attractions press release, which lists Bob Neal still acting as Personal Management for Elvis, was created on February 3, 1955. This is the earliest known press release for the future King of Rock 'n' Roll. The display measures approximately 25 1/4 by 35 1/4 inches (64.13 x 89.53 cm) and is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The press release is in Excellent condition with one minor area of foxing.

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1956 Elvis Presley

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Description: This early Elvis Presley "Mr. Rhythm" souvenir picture album from 1956 contains a studio portrait image of Elvis by William Speer on the back cover. The front cover features an additional studio portrait by William Speer of Elvis and states "IN PERSON! Elvis PRESLEY - COUNTRY MUSIC'S 'Mr. Rhythm' Sensational New RCA Victor Singing Star with Blue Moon Boys." Eight interior pages include images of Elvis, the Louvin Brothers, Benny Martin, June Carter, Justin Tubb, and Mother Maybelle and the Carter Sisters. The artists pictured coincide with the lineup of performers that toured with Elvis in February of 1956, likely dating the offered picture album to that same time period. An excellent example of an early-career Elvis program with a limited run of performances in this roster. The souvenir picture album measures approximately 11 by 8 1/2 inches (27.94 x 21.59 cm) and is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The front and back cover show signs of discoloration and minor surface paper loss around the edges. The interior pages are in good condition overall with some minor foxing on the first page. Overall very good condition.

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1955 Elvis Presley Signed Envelope from the Big D Jamboree at the Sportatorium in Dallas, TX

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Description: The ultimate fan keepsake, this letter to Carol Eldred from her admirer Bobby Belew is signed on the envelope "Love Ya Elvis Presley." During this time, every boy in America took a back seat to heartthrob Elvis Presley. The front of the envelope is postmarked March 20, 1955, at 10 pm, Greenville, TX, and the enclosed letter reads, "Dear Carol, I'm sorry I forgot to call you. I must have been busy or I would have. Somebody stole our Black Cowboy hats last Saturday night. We think we know who did it. We turned it in to the police. It's not the hats are [sic] the money it's just the principle of the hole [sic] thing. We get our Report Card tomorrow (wish me luck) I hope I make good on it but I guess I didn't. I hope you can read this letter I was in a hurry rather I'm in a hurry. We are invited to a formal dance tonight I like to go to dances don't you? I guess I had better let you go for now. Bye Bye Bobby Belew the better half of the Belew twins." In parentheses, Bobby pens "write soon" and "over," and on the reverse continues, "PS We won't be there Sat. we will be in Abilene We are Guest Stars there Write Soon Bye Bye Bobby Belew."This was signed for Carol at Elvis' show at the Big D Jamboree at Ed McLemore's Sportatorium in Dallas, Texas on April 16, 1955. Carol was there to see Bobby, who along with his twin Benny performed in the South and that evening was playing the Big D Jamboree. Carol was waiting for Bobby backstage when Elvis asked if she wanted an autograph and she grabbed Bobby's letter from her purse. This was Elvis' first appearance in this renowned venue. The blue ink inscription on the reverse of this 3 3/8 by 5 3/4 inch (8.57 x 14.60 cm) envelope is as strong as if it were signed yesterday. This keepsake is offered with a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated. 

Condition Report: The paper is folded and discolored from age. The envelope is torn down one side from opening and slit along the bottom. The envelope is also discolored from age and the areas with glue have stronger discoloration. The signature is strong and bold.

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1955 Elvis Presley Super-Size Pictorial Personal Appearance Contract

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Description: Coming from a carnival background, Colonel Parker was quite the showman and would have these giant contracts on hand to pull out with great fanfare during show negotiations. The offered black, white and red example is a pristine version of the contract that Colonel Parker liked to use to make a grand gesture. This super-sized, pictorial personal appearance contract provides the general terms under which Elvis would perform and leaves space for any additional special terms. The top of the contract has a large black-and-white image of Elvis playing guitar and belting out a tune, and the lower section has a plethora of images of Elvis at all ages around the edge. The giant contract measures 36 1/2 by 8 1/2 inches (92.7 x 21.6 cm) and is offered with a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The contract has been stored rolled and presents in Near Mint condition with few defects.

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1955 Hank Snow Souvenir Photo Album Featuring Young Elvis Presley - A Rare Early Survivor

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Description: In 1954, Hank Snow convinced the directors of the Grand Ole Opry to allow Elvis to appear as Snow's opening act. Snow introduced Elvis to Colonel Tom Parker and for a short period, served as part of his management team with Colonel Parker. Even before his relationship with Elvis, Hank Snow was known as the "Singing Ranger" and had a musical career of his own. This Hank Snow Show souvenir photo album with the Singing Ranger pictured on the cover and an image of Jimmie Rodgers Snow in the upper right was sold at performances in 1955. This souvenir picture album starts with a 2-page inspirational story of Hank Snow's rise to success from a harsh childhood in Canada and continues with large 1-page images and descriptions of the entertainers with whom he would perform. These included Faron Young, Mother Maybelle and the Carter Sisters, Wilburn Brothers, Jimmie Rodgers Snow, Davis Sisters, Elvis Presley, and Slim Whitman. The last interior page credits Hank Snow All Star Jamboree, listing the artists, management, and Elvis Presley with Scotty and Bill, while the back cover was open for autographs. The souvenir album was a show program designed to introduce the talents on the Hank Snow Show. The black-and-white album with color on the front and back covers has six double-sided pages, measures approximately 11 by 8 1/2 inches (27.94 x 21.59 cm), and is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The cover of the album has some minor staining on the upper edge, some wear to the stapled edge and minor foxing to the back cover.

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Elvis Presley Gold and Diamond Ring with Large Lapis Lazuli Stone Gifted to Charlie Hodge

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Description: Lapis lazuli is a semi-precious stone that has been prized since ancient times for its celestial blue color. Since lapis lazuli is a symbol of royalty, no stone is more fitting to adorn the finger of the King than the offered 18-karat yellow gold ring with deep blue, oblong lapis lazuli stone surrounded by an open channel design with 24 diamonds measuring 22 mm each and weighing a total of 0.48 carat. The lapis lazuli stone measures 24 x 12 mm and the ring weighs 14.2 grams and is size 10 3/4. The interior of this mesmerizing ring is marked 18k and "Italy" and comes with a letter from Charlie Hodge which states in part, "This oblong shaped lapis gold ring with diamonds surrounding the blue lapis was a ring that Elvis wore quite often in the middle 1970's. I [sic] was one of his favorite rings as he always like [sic] lapis." The stone's association with strength, power, and honor makes it the perfect accessory for a star of Elvis' caliber and he certainly wore it well.  This striking ring is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.Please Note: The photo originally presented with this lot does not show Elvis wearing this ring.

Condition Report: The ring shows only minor signs of wear. Near Mint condition.

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1956 Early Elvis Presley Signed

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Description: This early Elvis Presley signed "Mr. Rhythm" souvenir picture program from 1956 contains a studio portrait image signed vertically "Elvis Presley" in bold ink along the left side of the back cover. The program is mounted in a framed display with a front cover of a program that features an additional studio portrait of Elvis which announces "IN PERSON! Elvis PRESLEY - COUNTRY MUSIC'S 'Mr. Rhythm' Sensational New RCA Victor Singing Star with Blue Moon Boys" with "Do Not Bend" handwritten across the front. The framed display also features three copies of black-and-white images from the period and a plaque which states, "This rare concert program was printed in December of 1955 as a program to be sold at Elvis' first appearances after the purchase of his contract from Sun Records to RCA Records on November 21, 1955. Elvis' first release under the RCA label was a #1 smash single. Elvis signed this program for a fan after an appearance on the Louisiana Hayride on January 21, 1956." A beautifully displayed example of an early career Elvis program with bold signature. The souvenir picture album measures 11 by 8 1/2 inches (27.94 x 21.59 cm) and the framed display measures 33 1/2 by 39 1/2 inches (85.09 x 100.33 cm) and is accompanied by a certificate from PSA DNA and a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The display is in excellent condition overall with slight foxing to the back cover of the program on the left side just under the signature. Accompanying letters indicate that prior to framing the program contained adhesive residue to the spine, edge wear, scattered light creasing, scattered trivial soiling and adhesive residue on the back cover from a previous mounting. The program was not removed from the frame so previous condition notes have not been confirmed.

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1956 Rare Elvis Presley Original

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Description: In November of 1955, RCA bought Elvis' contract from Sun Records. Elvis was a budding star with an original beat and wow, how this gamble would pay off for RCA. Elvis' first studio album was released by RCA in March of 1956 and was the first rock and roll album to make the top of the Billboard charts, remaining at number 1 for 10 weeks. RCA promoted its newfound sensation as the "Young Man with the Big Beat" and this rare original poster produced by RCA features the cover of this million-selling album. Only three copies of this poster are known to exist. The poster touts the "New Orthophonic High Fidelity Album - Available on Long Play and 45EP" and utilizes bold black-and-white graphics with pops of bright pink lettering to catch the eyes of young fans. Little did RCA know that fateful day in 1955 that this young man with the big beat would create a revolution in the industry and change the face of music for generations. The framed poster measures 32 by 17 inches (81.28 x 43.18 cm) and is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated. 

Condition Report: The poster is in fantastic condition overall with two minor horizontal crease lines from folding and evince of tiny pin holes in corners.

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Complete Set of Elvis Presley's RCA Victor 45 RPM EPs - All 29 Releases from 1956-“67!

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Description: In November 1955, RCA bought Elvis' contract from Sun Records. In March 1956, RCA released Elvis' first full-length album, simply titled Elvis Presley, which sold more than 350,000 copies in just over a month. RCA simultaneously released two 45 EPs of the same title that together included all 12 tracks available on the LP. Extended Plays, commonly referred to as EPs, were created in the 1950s and contained more than the traditional two tracks on most 45s. By releasing both the LP and EPs at the same time, RCA was assuring saturation of its new star in a market that used record players with varying capabilities. RCA's strategy proved victorious, with the EPs selling even more copies than the LP. The success of Elvis Presley made it the first in music history to sell more than a million copies, and Elvis became the first RCA single artist to reach a million dollars in sales. The album reached number 1 on the Billboard charts and launched Elvis' long career with RCA.  This complete set of 45 RPM EPs (and one "Compact 33 Double") includes:1956 ELVIS PRESLEY  (EPA-747)ELVIS PRESLEY  (EPB-1254 [2 EPs])HEARTBREAK HOTEL  (EPA-821)ELVIS PRESLEY (EPA-830)THE REAL ELVIS  (EPA-940)ANY WAY YOU WANT ME  (EPA-965)ELVIS, VOL. 1  (EPA-992)LOVE ME TENDER  (EPA-4006)ELVIS, VOL. 2  (EPA-993)1957 STRICTLY ELVIS  (EPA-994)PEACE IN THE VALLEY  (EPA-4054)JUST FOR YOU  (EPA-4041)LOVING YOU, VOL. 1  (EPA-1-1515)LOVING YOU, VOL. 2  (EPA-2-1515)JAILHOUSE ROCK  (EPA-4114)ELVIS SINGS CHRISTMAS SONGS  (EPA-4108)1958 KING CREOLE, VOL. 1  (EPA-4319)KING CREOLE, VOL. 2  (EPA-4321)ELVIS SAILS  (EPA-4325)CHRISTMAS WITH ELVIS  (EPA-4340)1959 A TOUCH OF GOLD, VOL. 1 (RCA Gold Standard Series) (EPA-5088)A TOUCH OF GOLD, VOL. 2 (RCA Gold Standard Series) (EPA-5101)1960 A TOUCH OF GOLD, VOL. 3 (RCA Gold Standard Series) (EPA-5141)1961 ELVIS BY REQUEST - FLAMING STAR (LPC-128 [Compact 33 Double])1962 FOLLOW THAT DREAM  (EPA-4368)KID GALAHAD  (EPA-4371)1964 VIVA LAS VEGAS  (EPA-4382)1965 TICKLE ME  (EPA-4383)1967 EASY COME, EASY GO (EPA-4387)Each EP comes with its original sleeve. This complete collection of EPs is a remarkable example of the popularity of Elvis and RCA's ability to capitalize on his star power and unique sound. The collection is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The records range in condition from lightly played to very clean, with some exhibiting distresses related to normal use, including faint scratches, scuffs, etc. Excellent condition overall.

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Extremely Rare 1956 Elvis Presley RCA Victor Records Poster - with Image from His First RCA LP <em>Elvis Presley</em>

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Description: One of the earliest issued by RCA of Elvis in 1956, this poster has the seminal image of Elvis that appears on his first RCA LP entitled simply Elvis Presley. The image was taken during Elvis' performance on July 31, 1955, at the Fort Homer Hesterly Armory in Tampa, Florida. It's believed that at the time, the Colonel prompted the well-known celebrity photographer of the day, William S. "Popsie" Randolph, to shoot a number of action shots of the rising star. The Colonel used this image on a multitude of promotional communications early in Elvis' career, but this poster remains a rare example of its use by RCA beyond the album cover. It was argued in 2002 by Joseph Tunzi that the image was actually shot by photographer William V. "Red" Robertson. Regardless, this quintessential image of Elvis playing his new Martin D28 and belting a tune with mouth wide open is one of the most iconic images of a young Elvis early in his career and at the beginning of his rise to fame. This RCA poster measures 22 by 17 inches (55.88 x 43.18 cm) and is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The poster’s white border area has several distresses including a tear in the center top, several tape-stained spots, and scuffs. All of these defects could be matted out with proper framing, leaving the center artwork visible, with its relatively unscathed condition. Very Good condition overall.

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1956 Topps

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Description: Topps was founded in 1890 as American Leaf Tobacco, a tobacco importer that ran into difficulties during World War I when supplies were cut off. To stay afloat, in 1938 it became known as Topps and started manufacturing chewing gum. In 1950, to bolster the sale of its chewing gum against rival Bazooka, which sold its product wrapped in a comic strip, Topps began offering trading cards with the chewing gum. In 1956, Topps created the first of many trading card sets on the market dedicated to Elvis Presley, the King of Rock 'n' Roll. This original set includes 66 cards, the first 46 of which feature full-color images of Elvis in his musical career on the front with a descriptive caption contained in a red guitar. These 46 became known as the "Ask Elvis" cards, because on the back is the image of a telephone operator with the title "Ask Elvis," under which a question is posed and then answered in Elvis' voice, with his printed signature below. The only exception is the "Record Collector's Check List" card that lists on the reverse the current Elvis 45 RPM records of the time. The second 20 cards feature Elvis' film debut in Love Me Tender with full-color images of scenes from the movie captioned by a red movie clapboard replacing the red guitar. The reverse provides a description of the scene plot depicted in the front image. The cards are copyright Bubbles, Inc. and are printed in the U.S.A. Bubbles, Inc. was a "subsidiary" brand Topps created for non-sports trading card sets.This set is highly sought-after by collectors as the most popular entertainment series of trading cards produced, and the first to feature a single music artist. The set was produced in what would become the standard larger Topps trading card size, each card measuring 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches (8.89 x 6.35 cm). This incredible original full set is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated. 

Condition Report: This very presentable set presents with few major defects to any cards, some with softer corners and many mis-cut (this set is notoriously mis-cut from the factory). Excellent condition overall, with a few lesser.

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Rare 1957 <em>Elvis' Christmas Album</em> with Gold Gift Sticker

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Description: Holiday memories are always cherished, and what holiday is complete without the sweet sounds of Elvis singing his Christmas ballads and tunes? Elvis recorded his first of two Christmas albums in 1957, and it was released by RCA Victor in October of that year, in plenty of time to spread good cheer that Christmas season. An instant popular success, the album spent four weeks at the top of the Billboard charts, was the first Elvis title to be awarded Diamond status by the Recording Industry Association of America, and holds the record as the top-selling Christmas album of all time in the U.S.So many of these albums - accompanied by a red photo booklet with images of Elvis from Jailhouse Rock - were sold and enjoyed by families during the holidays that it is rare to find an early 1957 example that still has its scarce gold foil, tag-shaped "gift giving" sticker. This clever marketing tool made the album an instant gift, since the sticker, which listed several featured songs, also provided blank space after "To" and "From" lines, allowing the giver to simply fill in the details. This prized collectible album is perhaps the most valuable and sought-after of all of the many Elvis records. This album, catalog number LOC 1035, is offered with the original picture booklet, the original interior paper record sleeve and the gold gift tag sticker, which was handwritten to "Grand Mother" from "Butch" in blue ink. It measures 12 by 12 inches (30.48 x 30.48 cm) and is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Graceland Authenticated.

Condition Report: The record presents with normal signs of wear, including a few scuffs and minor scratches. The sleeve presents in very clean condition, with intact gold stamped text on the binding. The center photo album pages are free from distress. Excellent condition overall.

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